• Evaluation of the Legacy Careers Project

      Dodd, Vanessa; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, 2016-04)
    • Evidence to the Parliamentary Inquiry on the Future of Journalism

      Conboy, Martin; Firmstone, Julie; Fox, Carl; Elliott-Harvey, Charlotte; Mulderrig, Jane; Saunders, Joe; Wragg, Paul; University of Derby (UK Parliament, 2020-04-30)
      Submission to the call for evidence to the House of Lords Select Committee on Communications and Digital: The future of Journalism.
    • The experiment

      Lahav, Vered; University of Derby (New Art WM, 2015)
      Mixed media kinetic installation. Glass, wood and feathers.The SALON exhibition at The Waterhall Gallery, Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery, Edmund Street offered over 100 works of contemporary art for sale by 80 artists from the West Midlands and beyond between 13 November to 22 December 2015. Works included paintings, prints, photography, sculpture, book and film. SALON was the second selling exhibition organised by New Art WM this year offering audiences a unique chance to see and buy contemporary art by a wide range of artists at a range of prices starting at £20.
    • Exploring real world learning through Company Aside

      Daly, Darren; Barth, Caroline; Shelton, Fiona; University of Derby (2014)
      This is a case study of the ‘Company Aside’ initiative at Derby Theatre focussed on its efficacy as a learning model. The presentation was part of The University of Derby’s Learning, Teaching and Assessment conference on Pedagogies for The Future. It is an evaluative case study of the ‘Company Aside’ initiative as a learning model. The research was drawn from focus group discussions and questionnaires with students and professionals engaged on the programme, identifying key challenges, successes and considerations for further development.
    • Exploring teachers’ and pupils’ behaviour in online and face-to-face instrumental lessons

      King, Andrew; Prior, Helen; Waddington-Jones, Caroline; University of Hull (Taylor and Francis, 2019-01-21)
      The provision of instrumental lessons in certain areas of England can be hampered by the geographical position of some schools that are rural in nature, with teachers needing to travel long distances between schools. Internet-based technologies have been successfully used elsewhere to deliver instrumental lessons. A collaboration between the authors, North Yorkshire Music Action Zone and YouCanPlay allowed the delivery of instrumental lessons using Skype in combination with a Roland VR-3EX, an AV Mixer which offers 3 camera angles and good quality sound. Our aim was to repurpose existing technology to provide instrumental lessons in remote rural communities. The study was conducted in two-phases: a pilot study in North Yorkshire; and a further roll-out of the lessons in four additional areas (Cornwall; Cumbria; Durham/Darlington; and East Riding of Yorkshire). We wished to investigate the technical challenges and pedagogical aspects of the delivery, and also compare digitally-delivered and face-to-face instrumental lessons to explore the differences in behaviour. Data collected included pre- and post-project interviews with teachers, recordings of the teachers’ first and last lessons, and post-project questionnaires from pupils and their parents. Results suggested that there were technical challenges relating to sound, video and connection quality, and the physical environment of the lessons, some of which were alleviated by the Roland VR-3EX. Some concerns expressed by teachers in the initial interviews failed to materialise; others were overcome to some extent. Pupils concentrated well, were motivated to practice, and made good progress. Further analysis of the video data has allowed the comparison of face-to-face and digitally-delivered lessons. All teachers found the digital teaching more challenging than their usual face-to-face teaching; however, all reported that they would undertake similar teaching again. This paper focuses upon the exploring the behaviour of participants observed in the lessons. Digital delivery has the potential to provide greater access to instrumental lessons for children in rural communities.
    • Exploring the benefits of surround sound in contemporary live music performances

      Crossley, John; University of Derby (Audio Engineering Society, 2016-06)
      Spatial audio utilizing 5.1 surround sound and newer developments such as object oriented audio has become well established in cinema and home theaters. The expansion of this into live musical performance is quite limited. This work explores the benefits of surround sound for contemporary music performance. A 20-channel Wavefield synthesis system was compared to a high quality stereo sound reinforcement system under identical experimental conditions. An original composition was used to avoid familiarity with program material and to encourage focus on spatial considerations. Data drawn from audiences at both performances is used to quantify the perceptual differences for the average audience and to draw conclusions as to the usefulness of using a system of this type in an “average” contemporary live music performance.
    • Fabrica-tactilis, skilful production, structure - Fabric that may be touched, tangible

      Wells, Kate; Poundall, Robyn; University of Derby; David Nieper Ltd. (26/11/2014)
      Over the last 15 years, many of the tactile and haptic qualities of printed textiles have been abandoned for what is considered a fast and smooth digital solution through the increased popularity in using digital media as a the main source for design inspiration, conception and manufacture. Much of the creativity and qualities produced by hand processes and non digital techniques that in past produced tactile surfaces within a material via the creation of different densities or composite multiple layered structures, have in many cases been replaced with optical digital illusions of texture with the actual tactility of the material being lost or compromised. This paper outlines current collaborative design research that explores the uniting of haptic processes within cross-disciplinary fields of textiles, ceramics and glass. The results are the creation of a variety of materials both soft and hard. 3D-Soft is the result of natural and man-made manipulated fabrics that exhibit three-dimensional textured, puckered, distorted and translucent/transparent effects. That with further cross-disciplinary experimentation, the tactile textural qualities of fabric are transposed into hard surfaces: 3D-Hard, through different stiffening, ceramic and glass processes. The main aim of the research being the creation of unique exciting materials ‘Fabrica-Tactilis’ that develop and unite haptic skills with touch, exploring contradiction and harmony by embracing both traditional and non-traditional textile processes and alternative craft techniques for example ceramics and glass within their manufacture.
    • 'fancys or feelings': John Clare's hypochondriac poetics

      Lafford, Erin; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020-09-18)
      Clare’s mental and physical health has long been a source of interest and contention in his critical reception. Approaches to his ‘madness’ have ranged from retroactive diagnoses of bipolar disorder, to interrogations of insanity as a discourse of clinical power. If the result of these debates is that critics are more willing to read pathology as performance, or even to suggest that Clare’s disorder might not have been straightforwardly ‘real’, then this essay asks what can be gained from returning to some fleeting claims about the poet’s mental and physical health that express a struggle between reality and imagination, but have not yet received sufficient attention. I refer here to suggestions, both from his contemporary moment and from his subsequent critical reception, that Clare was a hypochondriac. Clare has been overlooked in critical conversations that discuss the significance of hypochondria as a facet of the Romantic medical imagination and cultivation of ‘fashionable disease’ but, as I hope to show, hypochondria should be taken seriously as a conceptual lens through which to read his poetic imagination in relation to illness and disorder. Hypochondria occupies a distinct interpretative space of uncertainty and of literary associations that, this essay argues, is better able to approach Clare on his own terms. I consider hypochondria in two interrelated ways: as a social and literary culture that Clare wanted to participate in and that also framed some of his writing, and as a form of poetic imagination and attention that emerged from Clare’s anxious scrutiny of his own body and mind. I also explore, through a final reading of a sonnet Clare published in the London Magazine in 1821, how hypochondria can become an important lens through which to consider his lyric subjectivity, uncovering as it does the ambiguously pathological experiences or registers that might disrupt his observation of the natural world.
    • Feel it in my bones: Composing multimodal experience through tissue conduction

      Lennox, Peter; McKenzie, Ian; Brown, Michael; University of Derby (Les éditions de PRISM, 28/09/2017)
      We outline here the feasibility of coherently utilising tissue conduction for spatial audio and tactile input. Tissue conduction display-specific compositional concerns are discussed; it is hypothesised that the qualia available through this medium substantively differ from those for conventional artificial means of appealing to auditory spatial perception. The implications include that spatial music experienced in this manner constitutes a new kind of experience, and that the ground rules of composition are yet to be established. We refer to results from listening experiences with one hundred listeners in an unstructured attribute elicitation exercise, where prominent themes such as “strange”, “weird”, “positive”, “spatial” and “vibrations” emerged. We speculate on future directions aimed at taking maximal advantage of the principle of multimodal perception to broaden the informational bandwidth of the display system. Some implications for composition for hearing-impaired are elucidated.
    • Finding lines

      Shore, Tim; University of Derby (Derby Museum and Art Gallery, 15/07/2017)
      A series of 10 drawings and one video (titled Faint/Feint) that explore process, performance and gesture, selected for the group exhibition ‘Finding Lines – A Celebration Of Drawing And Mark Making’ at Derby Museum and Art Gallery. The ten drawings for Finding Lines are not drawings, they are carbon copies made with small sheets of typewriter carbon paper placed underneath the paper that will be drawn on, and on top of a second sheet of paper which receives the impression of the drawing. Each drawing is made of a series of straight lines drawn with the aid of a set square. Faint/Feint privileges the most basic elements of drawing; pencil, line, paper and tool. The carbon copy is an ‘automatic’ record of the corporeal (and cognitive) act of drawing: it captures all the mistakes I make; the slips, smudges, misalignment and movement - and replicates them. The drawing is a poor performance of an activity that could easily be automated. I have approached drawing as a corporeal exercise that relies on concentration and stamina and which is always imperfect because in doing it I can never match the precision of the computer (although the carbon copy nods to the perfect copying of the photocopier and the printer). Faint/Feint 10 x A1 carbon copy drawings, 60gsm newsprint.
    • The first rule of judging club…: inside the saltire society literary awards

      Marsden, Stevie; Squires, Claire; University of Leicester; University of Stirling (Lectito BV, 2019-12-11)
      Book awards are a pervasive aspect of contemporary book culture, attracting both substantial media and scholarly attention. They confer prestige, create marketing opportunities, push sales, and contribute to the early stages of canon formation. Yet, beyond occasional media splashes when judges break ranks and disagree, there is little insight into the administrative and decision-making processes inside book awards. This article draws on the autoethnographic experiences of two academic researchers, who were simultaneously participants (as administrator and judge) for the Saltire Society Literary Awards. In so doing, the article gives insight into particular moments within the administration and judging of the awards, such as changes instigated by research findings and debates surrounding gender imbalance in Scottish literary award culture. It also examines some of the challenges of operating as embedded researchers. The article analyses what autoethnographic methods can bring to an understanding of the Saltire Society’s Literary Awards and other cultural awards, and the implications of embedded research and collaborative autoethnography for 21st century book culture scholarship more widely. It reflects upon modes of embedded research by making evident the challenges and dilemmas of researching from the ‘inside’. The ethical framework for such research is far from simple, but in exploring particular moments with perspectives from both inside and outside the judging processes, and in interrogating the practices of literary consecration, the article casts light upon this particular ‘judging club’ and its practices, and illuminates ways in which researchers might consider, orientate, and carry out further research into processes of cultural consecration.
    • Flexible feedback project

      Draycott, Ann; Higson, Rob; University of Derby (21/10/2015)
      The project aimed to create a workflow which allowed tutors to provide students with access to feedback they could flexibly use to support their learning at times and in place of their choosing. It was envisaged that this workflow, or aspects of it, could be adapted by tutors within the University of Derby and beyond it to meet their needs and those of their students. A key consideration of the project was the need to create visual resources for students who worked in a very visual medium. Our aim was to create resources and processes which were accessible to them in terms of their individuals learning needs and abilities. The project was shortlisted as a finalist for the 2014 MEDEA awards in Brussels at the Flemish Ministry of Education Headquarters. It was selected out of 237 entries and the project was one of the 8 finalists from 29 countries.
    • Flirting with space: journeys and creativity

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (2010)
      The idea of ‘flirting’ with space is central to this book. Space is conceptualized as being in constant flux as we make our way through contexts in our daily lives, considered in relation to encounters with complexities and flows of materiality. Through considerations of dynamic processes of contemporary life-spaces, the book engages the inter-relations of space and journeys, and how creativity happens in those inter-relations. Unravelled through wide-ranging investigations, this book builds new critical syntheses of the intertwining of space and life: the mundane and exotic, ‘lay’ and ‘artistic’. The book creates a fascinating and original view of our interaction with space.
    • Flirting with space: thinking landscape relationally

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (2013-04-26)
      For over a decade landscape has been exemplary of the critical debates between representational and so-called non-representational theories affecting cultural geographies. At the same time discussions concerning mobility contest the familiar emphasis upon the habitual and situated character of landscape and its role in the work of representations. This article offers a contribution to the growing awareness of a need to try and engage these debates surrounding landscape across geographical, anthropological, cultural and art theory amongst others. It considers different debates on landscape through the notion of spacing particularly in terms of how we understand artwork and representation, insistently in comparison with wider kinds of practice. Landscape is considered as the expressive-poetics of spacing in a way that makes possible a dynamic relationality between representations and practices both situated and mobile. Keywords art practice, landscape, performativity, poetics, spacing
    • Florian Roithmayr, the authority of other scientists.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (Motinternational, 2015)
      Essay to accompany Florian Roithmayr’s shows at MOTINTERNATIONAL and Site.
    • Folklinguistics and social meaning in Australian English.

      Penry Williams, Cara; La Trobe University; University of Derby (Routledge, 2019-09-12)
      Folklinguistics and Social Meaning in Australian English presents an original study of Australian English and, via this, insights into Australian society. Utilising folklinguistic accounts, it uncovers everyday understandings of contemporary Australian English through variations across linguistic systems (sounds, words, discourse and grammar). Focusing on one variation at time, it explores young speakers’ language use and their evaluations of the same forms. The analysis of talk about talk uncovers ethnic, regional and social Others in social types and prevailing ideologies around Australian English essential for understanding Australian identity-making processes, as well as providing insights and methods relevant beyond this context. These discussions demonstrate that while the linguistic variations may occur in other varieties of English, they are understood through local conceptualisations, and often as uniquely Australian. This book harnesses the value and richness of discourse in explorations of the sociocultural life of language. The findings show that analysis attending to language ideologies and identities can help discover the micro–macro links needed in understanding social meanings. The volume explores a wide range of language features but also provides a deep contemplation of Australian English.
    • Forge

      Bosward, Marc; Shore, Tim; Poynton, Stuart; University of Derby (2014)
      Site-specific projection pieces exploring the architecture and history of the Derwent Valley Mills. The ‘Forge’ installation was part of the DerwentWISE ‘Pulse’ project and was installed in partnership with Quad, Derby. The collaborative work will be developed further through planned engagement with a range of national and international locations and historical narratives, with particular reference to industrialization and the societal impact of technological development.
    • Forsøk å be noen som ser stygge ut om å ta en ansiktsløfting

      Hooley, Tristram; Lillehammer University College (Utdanning.no, 2016)
    • ‘The Found Footage Composite: History, Hybridity and the Animated World’

      Bosward, Marc; University of Derby (02/09/2016)
      The paper will describe a practical methodology designed to deploy found footage, animation, digital compositing and special effects techniques to critically evaluate the ontological status of found footage in reference to materiality and truth-value. In this framework, the construction of non-real spaces that synthesise animation and found footage are explored for their potential in describing alternate histories with regards to memory and ideology. How can the material aspects of found footage be deployed within spatial and temporal collage films that challenge linear notions of memory and the past?