• 'fancys or feelings': John Clare's hypochondriac poetics

      Lafford, Erin; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020-09-18)
      Clare’s mental and physical health has long been a source of interest and contention in his critical reception. Approaches to his ‘madness’ have ranged from retroactive diagnoses of bipolar disorder, to interrogations of insanity as a discourse of clinical power. If the result of these debates is that critics are more willing to read pathology as performance, or even to suggest that Clare’s disorder might not have been straightforwardly ‘real’, then this essay asks what can be gained from returning to some fleeting claims about the poet’s mental and physical health that express a struggle between reality and imagination, but have not yet received sufficient attention. I refer here to suggestions, both from his contemporary moment and from his subsequent critical reception, that Clare was a hypochondriac. Clare has been overlooked in critical conversations that discuss the significance of hypochondria as a facet of the Romantic medical imagination and cultivation of ‘fashionable disease’ but, as I hope to show, hypochondria should be taken seriously as a conceptual lens through which to read his poetic imagination in relation to illness and disorder. Hypochondria occupies a distinct interpretative space of uncertainty and of literary associations that, this essay argues, is better able to approach Clare on his own terms. I consider hypochondria in two interrelated ways: as a social and literary culture that Clare wanted to participate in and that also framed some of his writing, and as a form of poetic imagination and attention that emerged from Clare’s anxious scrutiny of his own body and mind. I also explore, through a final reading of a sonnet Clare published in the London Magazine in 1821, how hypochondria can become an important lens through which to consider his lyric subjectivity, uncovering as it does the ambiguously pathological experiences or registers that might disrupt his observation of the natural world.
    • Feel it in my bones: Composing multimodal experience through tissue conduction

      Lennox, Peter; McKenzie, Ian; Brown, Michael; University of Derby (Les éditions de PRISM, 28/09/2017)
      We outline here the feasibility of coherently utilising tissue conduction for spatial audio and tactile input. Tissue conduction display-specific compositional concerns are discussed; it is hypothesised that the qualia available through this medium substantively differ from those for conventional artificial means of appealing to auditory spatial perception. The implications include that spatial music experienced in this manner constitutes a new kind of experience, and that the ground rules of composition are yet to be established. We refer to results from listening experiences with one hundred listeners in an unstructured attribute elicitation exercise, where prominent themes such as “strange”, “weird”, “positive”, “spatial” and “vibrations” emerged. We speculate on future directions aimed at taking maximal advantage of the principle of multimodal perception to broaden the informational bandwidth of the display system. Some implications for composition for hearing-impaired are elucidated.
    • Finding lines

      Shore, Tim; University of Derby (Derby Museum and Art Gallery, 15/07/2017)
      A series of 10 drawings and one video (titled Faint/Feint) that explore process, performance and gesture, selected for the group exhibition ‘Finding Lines – A Celebration Of Drawing And Mark Making’ at Derby Museum and Art Gallery. The ten drawings for Finding Lines are not drawings, they are carbon copies made with small sheets of typewriter carbon paper placed underneath the paper that will be drawn on, and on top of a second sheet of paper which receives the impression of the drawing. Each drawing is made of a series of straight lines drawn with the aid of a set square. Faint/Feint privileges the most basic elements of drawing; pencil, line, paper and tool. The carbon copy is an ‘automatic’ record of the corporeal (and cognitive) act of drawing: it captures all the mistakes I make; the slips, smudges, misalignment and movement - and replicates them. The drawing is a poor performance of an activity that could easily be automated. I have approached drawing as a corporeal exercise that relies on concentration and stamina and which is always imperfect because in doing it I can never match the precision of the computer (although the carbon copy nods to the perfect copying of the photocopier and the printer). Faint/Feint 10 x A1 carbon copy drawings, 60gsm newsprint.
    • The first rule of judging club…: inside the saltire society literary awards

      Marsden, Stevie; Squires, Claire; University of Leicester; University of Stirling (Lectito BV, 2019-12-11)
      Book awards are a pervasive aspect of contemporary book culture, attracting both substantial media and scholarly attention. They confer prestige, create marketing opportunities, push sales, and contribute to the early stages of canon formation. Yet, beyond occasional media splashes when judges break ranks and disagree, there is little insight into the administrative and decision-making processes inside book awards. This article draws on the autoethnographic experiences of two academic researchers, who were simultaneously participants (as administrator and judge) for the Saltire Society Literary Awards. In so doing, the article gives insight into particular moments within the administration and judging of the awards, such as changes instigated by research findings and debates surrounding gender imbalance in Scottish literary award culture. It also examines some of the challenges of operating as embedded researchers. The article analyses what autoethnographic methods can bring to an understanding of the Saltire Society’s Literary Awards and other cultural awards, and the implications of embedded research and collaborative autoethnography for 21st century book culture scholarship more widely. It reflects upon modes of embedded research by making evident the challenges and dilemmas of researching from the ‘inside’. The ethical framework for such research is far from simple, but in exploring particular moments with perspectives from both inside and outside the judging processes, and in interrogating the practices of literary consecration, the article casts light upon this particular ‘judging club’ and its practices, and illuminates ways in which researchers might consider, orientate, and carry out further research into processes of cultural consecration.
    • Flexible feedback project

      Draycott, Ann; Higson, Rob; University of Derby (21/10/2015)
      The project aimed to create a workflow which allowed tutors to provide students with access to feedback they could flexibly use to support their learning at times and in place of their choosing. It was envisaged that this workflow, or aspects of it, could be adapted by tutors within the University of Derby and beyond it to meet their needs and those of their students. A key consideration of the project was the need to create visual resources for students who worked in a very visual medium. Our aim was to create resources and processes which were accessible to them in terms of their individuals learning needs and abilities. The project was shortlisted as a finalist for the 2014 MEDEA awards in Brussels at the Flemish Ministry of Education Headquarters. It was selected out of 237 entries and the project was one of the 8 finalists from 29 countries.
    • Flirting with space: journeys and creativity

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (2010)
      The idea of ‘flirting’ with space is central to this book. Space is conceptualized as being in constant flux as we make our way through contexts in our daily lives, considered in relation to encounters with complexities and flows of materiality. Through considerations of dynamic processes of contemporary life-spaces, the book engages the inter-relations of space and journeys, and how creativity happens in those inter-relations. Unravelled through wide-ranging investigations, this book builds new critical syntheses of the intertwining of space and life: the mundane and exotic, ‘lay’ and ‘artistic’. The book creates a fascinating and original view of our interaction with space.
    • Flirting with space: thinking landscape relationally

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (2013-04-26)
      For over a decade landscape has been exemplary of the critical debates between representational and so-called non-representational theories affecting cultural geographies. At the same time discussions concerning mobility contest the familiar emphasis upon the habitual and situated character of landscape and its role in the work of representations. This article offers a contribution to the growing awareness of a need to try and engage these debates surrounding landscape across geographical, anthropological, cultural and art theory amongst others. It considers different debates on landscape through the notion of spacing particularly in terms of how we understand artwork and representation, insistently in comparison with wider kinds of practice. Landscape is considered as the expressive-poetics of spacing in a way that makes possible a dynamic relationality between representations and practices both situated and mobile. Keywords art practice, landscape, performativity, poetics, spacing
    • Florian Roithmayr, the authority of other scientists.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (Motinternational, 2015)
      Essay to accompany Florian Roithmayr’s shows at MOTINTERNATIONAL and Site.
    • Folklinguistics and social meaning in Australian English.

      Penry Williams, Cara; La Trobe University; University of Derby (Routledge, 2019-09-12)
      Folklinguistics and Social Meaning in Australian English presents an original study of Australian English and, via this, insights into Australian society. Utilising folklinguistic accounts, it uncovers everyday understandings of contemporary Australian English through variations across linguistic systems (sounds, words, discourse and grammar). Focusing on one variation at time, it explores young speakers’ language use and their evaluations of the same forms. The analysis of talk about talk uncovers ethnic, regional and social Others in social types and prevailing ideologies around Australian English essential for understanding Australian identity-making processes, as well as providing insights and methods relevant beyond this context. These discussions demonstrate that while the linguistic variations may occur in other varieties of English, they are understood through local conceptualisations, and often as uniquely Australian. This book harnesses the value and richness of discourse in explorations of the sociocultural life of language. The findings show that analysis attending to language ideologies and identities can help discover the micro–macro links needed in understanding social meanings. The volume explores a wide range of language features but also provides a deep contemplation of Australian English.
    • Forge

      Bosward, Marc; Shore, Tim; Poynton, Stuart; University of Derby (2014)
      Site-specific projection pieces exploring the architecture and history of the Derwent Valley Mills. The ‘Forge’ installation was part of the DerwentWISE ‘Pulse’ project and was installed in partnership with Quad, Derby. The collaborative work will be developed further through planned engagement with a range of national and international locations and historical narratives, with particular reference to industrialization and the societal impact of technological development.
    • Forsøk å be noen som ser stygge ut om å ta en ansiktsløfting

      Hooley, Tristram; Lillehammer University College (Utdanning.no, 2016)
    • ‘The Found Footage Composite: History, Hybridity and the Animated World’

      Bosward, Marc; University of Derby (02/09/2016)
      The paper will describe a practical methodology designed to deploy found footage, animation, digital compositing and special effects techniques to critically evaluate the ontological status of found footage in reference to materiality and truth-value. In this framework, the construction of non-real spaces that synthesise animation and found footage are explored for their potential in describing alternate histories with regards to memory and ideology. How can the material aspects of found footage be deployed within spatial and temporal collage films that challenge linear notions of memory and the past?
    • Fractured pasts: Found footage collage and the animated documentary

      Bosward, Marc; University of Derby (02/06/2017)
      The paper will present a body of practice-led research within experimental documentary and animation that interrogates the use of found footage as a historiographical strategy. The research examines the capacity of found footage collage in articulating the layered temporalities present in the formation of collective recollection. How can the materiality of found footage be deployed within spatial and temporal collage films that challenge linear notions of memory and the past? The methodology draws from visual ethnography with regards to intersubjectivity, multivocality and the immaterial aspects of human experience. The approach aims to challenge notions of unitary meaning, objectivity and truth in historical representation. Can the fragmented, hybrid aesthetic of the moving collage render the partial and irregular experience of remembering, evoking the contingent and furtive conditions of personal and collective pasts? The work deploys appropriation strategies that decontextualize and recontextualise found footage as a method of ideological interruption, releasing the mutable, multiple meanings that accumulate and shift in the confluence of competing discourses. The paper will describe temporal structures that privilege simultaneity, overlap and layering in constructing unstable images that foreground a dialogical conception of the past. How can found footage collage and animation, as a historiographical practice, expand the language of non-fiction films that address memory and time?
    • Freedom of speech in a therapeutic age

      Hayes, Dennis; University of Derby (Routledge, 2017-05)
      Roy Harris (2009) and Adrian Pablé (2012) have argued that integrationists, in their philosophy and in their linguistics, have a Socratic approach to freedom of speech that sees vigorous and robust debate as the foundational freedom. Everything must be put to the test of criticism. Every citizen has a moral duty to defend freedom of speech and every academic has a duty to defend freedom of speech as the foundational freedom of the academy. Freedom of speech has historically been restricted and controlled at various times dependant on the contingent concept of human being at any time. Authoritarian attempts to control speech and antipathy to human freedom to assent or dissent from established opinion are familiar. In contemporary therapeutic culture restrictions on freedom of speech appear more kindly but are more authoritarian. Seeing human beings as diminished, vulnerable or mentally unwell provides the basis on which the state and its institutions can intervene and regulate freedom of speech and freedom to hear. Bans and censorship are now seen to be necessary to protect vulnerable individuals rather than to protect the cherished but untested ideas of the new moral elites. The kindliness of the new authoritarianism makes it harder to challenge without the challenger being seen as a victimiser. In the contemporary therapeutic university the right to assent alone is allowed. Even body language, sighs and ironic utterances are questionable. The therapeutic university is becoming the silent university. As the university is the embodiment of societal attitudes to freedom of speech what we are seeing is the creation of the silent student and future citizen who dares not speak; not for fear of being harmed but for fear of harming vulnerable others. References Harris, R. (2009) Freedom of Speech and Philosophy of Education, British Journal of Educational Studies, 57 (2) June 2009: 111-126. Pablé, A. M. (2012) Excommunicated on the grounds of Harrisy: Roy Harris, Linguistics and freedom of speech, in Ashley, LRN & Finke, W (Eds.). Language Under Controls: Policies and Practices Affecting Freedom of Speech: Selected Papers from the International Conference, September 23-24, 2011. East Rockaway, NY: Cummings & Hathaway: 1-12.
    • The Frequency Of Trees

      Locke, Caroline; University of Derby (Yorkshire Sculpture Park, 2014-10)
      The Frequency Of Trees is part of the Yorkshire Sculpture Park (YSP) Open Air collection and has an extremely large footfall (700,000 visitors during 2015/16). Public audiences engage with the research directly when walking through the grounds of the park. Spectators discuss how sound moves and how the body responds. The sculpture comprises of a series of 12 tuning forks tuned to the frequency of different trees within YSP: Oak, Horse Chestnut, Beech and the Cedar of Lebanon in the Formal Garden. The frequency of sound is measured by counting the number of occurrences of an event per unit of time. By measuring the number of times a branch or leaf on a tree moved a certain distance within a set time frame, Locke was able to equate tree movements with Hertz readings, the unit used to measure sound. After striking the tuning forks, spectators are required to listen for the resonating frequencies that continue long after the initial strike – these are the pure musical tones that exist after the initial high overtones recede. The commonly stated human hearing range is 20–16000Hz thus the 16Hz fork appears to have no sound, however , spectators can still enjoy the sight of sound by watching the fork resonate. The work is used as generator for learning on various educational programmes at Yorkshire Sculpture Park .
    • Friends and feelings: the appropriation of Facebook by Irish radio stations to enhance audience engagement through affective media experiences

      McMahon, Daithi; University of Derby (Lund University and University of Westminster, 2016)
      Radio audiences have become increasingly interested in engaging with radio stations via social network sites (SNS), finding radio station Facebook pages as a source of information, entertainment and as a channel for audience participation. Meanwhile in an attempt to remain viable in an increasingly digital mediascape radio station management have appropriated Facebook and other SNSs to create a broader media experience for their audiences. This has involved moving radio stations beyond simple audio broadcasters to become digital media producers, adding visual and highly interactive dimensions to their arsenal. The adoption of Facebook by the Irish radio industry has been driven by commercial forces with station management engaging with audiences via Facebook to help grow online and on-air audience numbers with the goal of increasing revenue. Using the Irish radio industry as a case study this research found that some radio stations are more adept at engaging with their audiences than others. Those stations that employ the medium effectively are connecting with audiences on an emotional level, evoking feelings and instigating affective communication between users. The focus of this research resides at the nexus of radio industry trends, audience engagement experiences and radio production practices, all of which have changed as a result of the adoption of Facebook and other SNSs by the Irish radio industry. This research involved in-depth analysis of three radio stations including commercial and public service stations broadcasting to local, regional and national audiences. The methodology included analysis of Facebook page content, interviews with industry professionals and an audience survey of N=419 radio listeners/Facebook users. This research forms part of the author’s doctoral thesis which explores the social, economic and cultural implications of Facebook use by Irish radio stations and their audiences.
    • Friendship and peer cultures in childhood (Mexico).

      Fritz Macias, Heidi; Universidad Iberoamericana (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2019)
    • From dialectics to dancing: Reading, writing and the experience of the everyday life in the diaries of Frank P. Forster

      Feely, Catherine; University of Manchester (Oxford University Press, 2010-03)
      This article is an examination of the reading and writing practices of Frank Forster (1910-98), a casual labourer and Communist autodidact, as revealed in the diaries he kept between 1934 and 1938. One of the most influential texts Forster encountered during this period was The Positive Outcome of Philosophy, written by Joseph Dietzgen (1828-88), a German tanner who had also independently developed a Marxist philosophy of dialectical materialism. Dietzgen's work on the relationship between thought and experience appealed enormously to autodidact sensibilities. Recording his reading at the same time as other activities, such as cinema attendance and dancing, Forster was able to reshape Dietzgen's ideas so that he could apply them to the issues most immediately important to him, particularly the pursuit of social and sexual experience. This seemingly idiosyncratic understanding of ‘the dialectic’ can only be understood in the particular context of Forster's life, locality and time. His diaries deserve wider attention as compelling evidence of how one individual combined theory with everyday life to create his own form of ‘self-help’.
    • From genre to zenre

      Callow, Christos; Birkbeck, University of London (Birbeck, University of London, 2014)
    • From pillar to post

      Bosward, Marc; Shore, Tim; Poynton, Stuart; University of Derby (2014-03)
      Site-specific projection pieces exploring the architecture and history of the Derwent Valley Mills. ‘From Pillar to Post’ was a digital animated film displayed at Strutt’s Mill Belper using projection-mapping technology as part of the launch for the refurbished and remodeled exhibition spaces.