• Engaging in pedagogic and artistic practice in a learning theatre

      Daly, Darren; Barth, Caroline; Shelton, Fiona; University of Derby (2015)
      This is a case study of the Learning Theatre, identifying some of the challenges and successes of its collaborative HE projects.The presentation was part of a conference investigating partnerships between HEIs and Professional Theatres. It gives an overview of some of the learning initiatives that the theatre operates and the concept of the Learning Theatre and then focusses on a case study of the ‘Company Aside’ initiative within this context. The research is focussed on student experience throughout the process and identifies key considerations for the development of the scheme and the partnership.
    • Engaging Leaders: The challenge of inspiring collective commitment in universities

      Gentle, Paul; Forman, Dawn; University of Derby (Routledge, 2014)
      Addressing the question of how leadership can work most successfully in universities, Engaging Leaders strengthens the sense of shared professional knowledge and capability amongst leaders in higher education. Presenting a narrative of change which not only spells out why universities need to work differently, this book also takes the reader through clear practical steps which any practising leader can take in order to build a collaborative professional culture which supports and challenges all members of an academic community.
    • Engaging the local community in cultural heritage through a children’s ceramic arts exhibition

      Yates, Ellen; Szenasi, Judith; University of Derby (Peter Lang, 2021)
      This chapter describes a research project which aimed to increase social inclusion and access to the arts and cultural heritage, through a children’s ceramic arts exhibition. The exhibition was curated by an internationally recognised ceramic artist and located in an historic building within an inner city park in Derby, England, behind a culturally historic ceramics factory and museum. The project further aimed to reposition children as artists and heritage makers by valuing their ideas, creativity, identity and agency. Data was collected through interviews and through comments from the exhibition visitor’s book. Findings indicate that barriers exist within the UK education system which limit children’s full participation in the arts and cultural activities. The exhibition encouraged social inclusion and contested the idea of separate spaces for the display of adults and children products, but most significantly, children were repositioned as active agents in the construction of their cultural heritage.
    • Enlightenment science, technology and the industrial revolution: a case study of the Derby philosophers c1750-1820

      Elliott, Paul; University of Derby (Arkwright Society, Cromford, 2020-08-30)
      After briefly reviewing the historiography of Enlightenment science, industry and the Derby philosophers, this essay examines industry and science in eighteenth-century Derby and the industrial orientation of the philosophical societies. It then explores the relationship between the leading entrepreneurs and manufacturers Jedediah Strutt and Richard Arkwright and the ‘Derby Philosophers’, demonstrating how much they gained from their association with the Derby Philosophical Society. This is especially evident, as it demonstrates when we consider the case of Erasmus Darwin, first president of the Society, and how as a physician, avid mechanic and experimenter, he helped meld the worlds of Enlightenment science and industry. Likewise, whilst the struggles that Arkwright experienced over his patents during the 1780s has been often described, viewing these from the perspective of the Derby Philosophers adds a new dimension to our understanding of the relationship between scientific associations, industrial innovation and entrepreneurialism. The article concludes with a critical investigation of the role of the sciences in agriculture and domestic economy and the part played by the Derby Philosophers in promoting scientific education for what they believed to be the benefit of industry and manufactures.
    • Ensuring quality in online career mentoring

      Hooley, Tristram; Neary, Siobhan; Hutchinson, Jo; University of Derby (2015)
      This article explores the issue of quality in online career mentoring. It builds on a previous evaluation of Brightside, an online mentoring system in the UK which is primarily aimed at supporting young people's transitions to further learning. The article notes that participants in Brightside's mentoring programmes reported satisfaction with their experiences, with many stating that it helped them to make decisions and to positively change their learning and career behaviours. However, the article argues that there are challenges in ensuring quality and consistency connected to both the voluntary nature of mentoring and the online mode. The article proposes a 10-point quality framework to support quality assurance, initial training and professional development for online mentors.
    • Entries on the L word and true blood.

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (Syracuse University Press., 13/11/2018)
      Entires on the finales of television series: The L word and True Blood as part of a collection on finales.
    • Ephemeral art and documenting the un-documentable.

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (06/07/2018)
      Concerned with the ephemeral and how it is perceived when lost to the fractures of time, Peggy Phelan suggests “you have to be there.” Phelan states that ephemera, specifically performance “become[s] itself through disappearance,” which draws empathy with Walter Benjamin’s notion of the “aura of the original.” In practice this a less than pragmatic account of the reality of experiencing such artworks, for how can they exist beyond the moment of making if not recorded, in order to map their histories? Archival devices are however, problematic, for how do we suitably record the remains of these artworks that, by their very premise, deny longevity and fixity? This paper interrogates the critical, sensitive and individualized distance necessary when capturing ephemeral artwork to allow it to remain true to intent. Moving beyond the disciplinary ghettos of event and documentation, it interrogates how divergent and sympathetic modes of practice allow for a greater level of sustainable critique. This complex and problematic terrain will be analysed to question if appropriate documents, with the varied and differing demands of works of art, can ever be possible. Based on artworks within ‘The Alternative Document’ exhibition (Project Space Plus, Lincoln UK, 2016, which I curated to include a collection of archival documents reconfigured as new artworks) I discuss the potential for legacy beyond formal and traditional means. Through this, I will suggest how it is possible to move beyond formal academic, artistic and museological conventions when documenting and re-staging ephemeral art.
    • Erasmus Darwin's Gardens: Medicine, Agriculture and the Sciences in the Eighteenth Century

      Elliott, Paul; University of Derby (Boydell and Brewer, 2021-06)
      Famous as the author of the Botanic Garden (1791) and grandfather of Charles Darwin (1809-1882), Erasmus Darwin (1731-1802) was a larger-than-life enlightenment natural philosopher (scientist) and writer who practised as a doctor across the English Midlands for nearly half a century. A practical gardener and horticulturist, Darwin created a botanic garden near Lichfield - which galvanised his poetry - and kept other gardens, an orchard and small "farm" in Derby. Informed by his medical practice and botanical studies, Darwin saw many parallels between animals, plants and humans which aroused hostility during the years of revolution, warfare and reaction, but helped him to write Zoonomia (1794/96) and Phytologia (1800) - his major studies of medicine, agriculture and gardening. Captivated by the changing landscapes and environments of town and country and supported by social networks such as those in Lichfield and Derby, Darwin avidly exchanged ideas about plants, animals and their diseases with family, patients, friends such as the poet Anna Seward (1742-1809), farmers, fellow doctors, huntsmen and even the local mole catcher. The is the first full study of Erasmus Darwin's gardening, horticulture and agriculture. It shows him as keen a nature enthusiast as his contemporary Rev. Gilbert White of Selbourne (1720-1793) or his grandson Charles, fascinated with everything from swarming insects and warring bees to domestic birds and dogs, pigs and livestock on his farm to fungi growing from horse dung in Derby tan yards. Ranging over his observations of plant physiology and anatomy to the use of plant "bandages" in his orchard and electrical machines to hasten seed germination to explosive studies of vegetable "brains", nerves and sensations, the book demonstrates the ways in which Erasmus Darwin's landscape and garden experiences transformed his understanding of nature. They provided him with insights into medicine and the environmental causes of diseases, the classification of plants and animals, chemistry, evolution, potential new medicines and foodstuffs and the ecological interdependency of the natural economy. Like the amorous vegetables of the Loves of the Plants (1789) which fascinated, scandalised and titillated late Georgian society, the many living creatures of Darwin's gardens and farm encountered in this book were for him real, dynamic, interacting and evolving beings who helped inspire and re-affirm his progressive social and political outlook.
    • Etherotopia or a country in the mind: bridging the gap between utopias and nirvanas

      Callow, Christos Jr; Birkbeck, University of London (Routledge, 2015-02-28)
      Joyce Hertzler concludes his History of Utopian Thought with the phrase ‘Utopia is not a social state it is a state of mind’. Other utopian scholars would argue that the truth is exactly the opposite, that utopia is a purely social matter. There seems to be a false dilemma here where one must choose between two, seemingly conflicting, schools of utopian thinking: social utopias and private ones. In John Carey’s words, ‘Whereas most utopias reform the world, some reform the self’. He says of the later that these ‘solitary utopians are Robinson Crusoes of the mind, inventing islands for themselves to inhabit’ and that they are very unlike ‘normal, public-spirited utopians’. In this essay Christos Callow Jr explores the potential of a utopia that reforms both world and self and proposes Etherotopia as its name.
    • An evalaution of BookTrust additional needs resources

      Robinson, Deborah; Moore, Nicki; Parker, Gordon; University of Derby (Institute of Education, University of Derby, 2016)
      This report explores reading for pleasure among children with special educational needs through an evaluation of BookTrust's additional needs resources.
    • Evaluating an interprofessional disease state and medication management review model

      Hoti, Kreshnik; Forman, Dawn; Hughes, Jeffery; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2013-11-18)
      There is lack of literature data reporting an incorporation of medication management reviews in students’ interprofessional education (IPE) and practice programs in aged care settings. This pilot study reports how an interprofessional disease state and medication management review program (DSMMR) was established in a residential aged care facility in Perth, Western Australia. Students from the professions of nursing, pharmacy and physiotherapy focused on a wellness check in the areas of cognition, falls and continence while integrating a medication management review. Students’ attitudes were explored using a pre- and post-placement questionnaire. Students indicated positive experience with the IPE DSMMR program which also resulted in their positive attitudinal shift towards IPE and practice. These findings indicated that aged care can be a suitable setting for student interprofessional programs focusing on DSMMR.
    • Evaluating social pedagogy training and development in Lincolnshire

      Moore, Nicki; Dodd, Vanessa; Sahar, Arif; University of Derby (2016)
      This report presents the findings and recommendations from an evaluation of social pedagogy training and implementation in residential homes in Lincolnshire. The social pedagogy training delivered by Jacaranda training in Spring 2015 was completed by 45 members of staff from three care homes in Lincolnshire
    • Evaluating the impact of career management skills module and internship programme within a university business school

      Taylor, Antony Richard; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (2014)
      This study evaluates the impact of an intervention on business school graduates’ employability comprising of a curriculum-based career management skills (CMS) module and an industrial placement year. The study uses data from the destinations of leavers of higher education survey to examine the employability of different groups within the cohort (no intervention, CMS module only and CMS module plus structured work experience). It finds that structured work experience has clear, positive effects on the ability of graduates to secure employment in ‘graduate level’ jobs within six months of graduation. Furthermore, participation in the CMS module also has a clear, positive effect upon the ability of participants to secure employment.
    • Evaluation of Careers Yorkshire and the Humber: inspiration activity and good practice guide.

      Artess, Jane; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2016-03)
      The evaluation captures the work of Careers Yorkshire and the Humber in their response to the government's 'inspiration agenda' which aims to support schools, colleges and prisons to inspire career aspiration in young people. Careers Yorkshire and the Humber is a regional provider of the National Careers Service.
    • Evaluation of the Chrysalis Summer School - 2008-2015

      Hooley, Tristram; Dodd, Vanessa; Sahar, Arif; University of Derby (International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, 2016-07)
      This report presents a mixed-methods Evaluation of the Chrysalis Summer School’s impact drawing on evaluation data from 2008-2015.
    • Evaluation of the Legacy Careers Project

      Dodd, Vanessa; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, 2016-04)
    • The experiment

      Lahav, Vered; University of Derby (New Art WM, 2015)
      Mixed media kinetic installation. Glass, wood and feathers.The SALON exhibition at The Waterhall Gallery, Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery, Edmund Street offered over 100 works of contemporary art for sale by 80 artists from the West Midlands and beyond between 13 November to 22 December 2015. Works included paintings, prints, photography, sculpture, book and film. SALON was the second selling exhibition organised by New Art WM this year offering audiences a unique chance to see and buy contemporary art by a wide range of artists at a range of prices starting at £20.
    • Exploring real world learning through Company Aside

      Daly, Darren; Barth, Caroline; Shelton, Fiona; University of Derby (2014)
      This is a case study of the ‘Company Aside’ initiative at Derby Theatre focussed on its efficacy as a learning model. The presentation was part of The University of Derby’s Learning, Teaching and Assessment conference on Pedagogies for The Future. It is an evaluative case study of the ‘Company Aside’ initiative as a learning model. The research was drawn from focus group discussions and questionnaires with students and professionals engaged on the programme, identifying key challenges, successes and considerations for further development.
    • Exploring teachers’ and pupils’ behaviour in online and face-to-face instrumental lessons

      King, Andrew; Prior, Helen; Waddington-Jones, Caroline; University of Hull (Taylor and Francis, 2019-01-21)
      The provision of instrumental lessons in certain areas of England can be hampered by the geographical position of some schools that are rural in nature, with teachers needing to travel long distances between schools. Internet-based technologies have been successfully used elsewhere to deliver instrumental lessons. A collaboration between the authors, North Yorkshire Music Action Zone and YouCanPlay allowed the delivery of instrumental lessons using Skype in combination with a Roland VR-3EX, an AV Mixer which offers 3 camera angles and good quality sound. Our aim was to repurpose existing technology to provide instrumental lessons in remote rural communities. The study was conducted in two-phases: a pilot study in North Yorkshire; and a further roll-out of the lessons in four additional areas (Cornwall; Cumbria; Durham/Darlington; and East Riding of Yorkshire). We wished to investigate the technical challenges and pedagogical aspects of the delivery, and also compare digitally-delivered and face-to-face instrumental lessons to explore the differences in behaviour. Data collected included pre- and post-project interviews with teachers, recordings of the teachers’ first and last lessons, and post-project questionnaires from pupils and their parents. Results suggested that there were technical challenges relating to sound, video and connection quality, and the physical environment of the lessons, some of which were alleviated by the Roland VR-3EX. Some concerns expressed by teachers in the initial interviews failed to materialise; others were overcome to some extent. Pupils concentrated well, were motivated to practice, and made good progress. Further analysis of the video data has allowed the comparison of face-to-face and digitally-delivered lessons. All teachers found the digital teaching more challenging than their usual face-to-face teaching; however, all reported that they would undertake similar teaching again. This paper focuses upon the exploring the behaviour of participants observed in the lessons. Digital delivery has the potential to provide greater access to instrumental lessons for children in rural communities.