• Agency in the darkness: ‘fear of the unknown’, learning disability and teacher education for inclusion

      Robinson, Deborah; Goodey, Chris; University of Derby; University of Leicester; Institute of Education, University of Derby, Derby, UK; Centre for Medical Humanities, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK (Taylor and Francis, 2017-09-04)
      This paper proposes inclusion phobia as a sharper and more operative definition of the ‘fear of the unknown’ often cited as an explanation for resistance to inclusive education. Using ‘severe and profound learning disability’ as the paradigm case, we situate the phobia surrounding this label in its social and historical context. Our hypothesis is that resistance to inclusion for this group is not rational but amounts to a thought disorder in a psychiatric sense. Using qualitative case studies of pre-service teachers on practicum and head teachers engaged in decisions about admissions, we demonstrate the workings and impact of inclusion phobia. We illustrate its trajectory from a general social dysfunction, to the systems that channel it to the individuals caught up in it. Our aim is to expose inclusion phobia so that, teacher educators, teachers and pre-service teachers might, in knowing it, find new ways to remedy it. In doing so, long standing resistance to inclusive education is made more tractable. We conclude with our own proposals for an anti-phobic curriculum for teacher education.
    • Alba

      Jinks, Cameron; University of Derby (Nature Connections, 2016)
      The photographs highlight the bleak and often brutal landscape of the region and the signs of past habitation. The ancient monuments of the stone-age, the strongholds of medieval clan control, sites of conflict, the ruins of the cleared villages are all evidence of a region with a rich cultural history, a culture that was systematically eroded from the early fifteenth century.
    • Alba

      Jinks, Cameron; University of Derby (2014-01)
      This exhibition combines the artist’s love of the Highlands in Scotland and photography with particular interest in historically significant sites and the change in land use in the region.
    • All data are local: thinking critically in a data-driven society

      Tupling, Claire; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2020-09-10)
    • The Alternative Document

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2018-11)
      A guest edited volume by Angela Bartram. Contents: Introduction, by Angela Bartram; Absence makes the heart grow fonder: rethinking intentional material loss in temporary art, by Sophie C. Kromholz; The Italic I – between liveness and the lens, by Emma Cocker and Clare Thornton; I am here – you are there: let’s meet sometime, by Andrew Pepper; HOW – Heathrow Orchard Walks, observations and explorations of vibrant land, by Kate Corder; Documentation with the result of its own performing, by Una Lee; Constructions of the moving body: drawing and dancing, by Rochelle Haley; WRITING/ PAINTING/READING/DRAWING: something not yet, and yet, still something, by Steve Dutton; (Mythologies of) diving, flying and in-between, by Louise K. Wilson; A sense of becoming and alienation: the retrospective in the work of Jordan McKenzie, by Angela Bartram.
    • The alternative document exhibition.

      Bartram, Angela; University of Lincoln (2016)
      Artists: Tim Etchells, Jordan McKenzie, Rochelle Haley, David Brazier & Kelda Free, Hector Canonge, Rachel Cherry, Luce Choules, Emma Cocker & Clare Thornton, Kate Corder, Chris Green & Katheryn Owen, Andrew Pepper, Louise K Wilson, Bartram O’Neill. Beyond most ephemeral artwork a memory remains in the mind of the observer and this forms part of the legacy of the fleeting event. However, memory is mostly a personal experience, that shifts, mutates, and fades over time to become distant, different to its origin, and in this way its archival potential is unreliable. To overcome this dilemma a variety of lens-based archival methods have become the tradition of recording the ‘actual’ event in as far as it is possible. Although a recorder, of any variation, can provide footage that gives place and context of the archive document, they present a dilemma – how much do they indicate what it was like to ‘be there’. For recordings are mediated and translated for posterity through the direction of the person holding the device and document their viewpoint and subjective encounter with the work. This creates an archival document open to subjective discussion, as a memorial and work in its own right, and of which alternatives are often sought. It is in this way that the disciplinary ghettos of event and documentation are abandoned in favour of a mode of practice that allows for a greater level of mutual critique. For documentation is also subject to the same vagaries of time as the event itself. Concerned with the ephemeral and how it is perceived Peggy Phelan represents a position on this subject of “you have to be there” in order to understand the ephemeral. Phelan acknowledges that a performance “become[s] itself through disappearance.” This argument draws empathy, but in practice is a less than pragmatic account of the reality of experiencing ephemeral works, for how is the work to exist beyond the moment if not recorded in some way. The Alternative Document exhibition at University of Lincoln seeks to expand on the idea of the ephemeral and its loss, by offering a platform where different acts of legacy can be witnessed and discussed. An accompanying symposium to the exhibition was held in Lincoln Performing Arts Centre on Saturday 13th February 2016 with a keynote address by Tim Etchells, and opened with a performance by Jordan McKenzie on the evening of Friday 12th February 2016.
    • The Alternative Document symposium.

      Bartram, Angela; University of Lincoln (2016-02)
      Beyond most ephemeral artwork a memory remains in the mind of the observer and this forms part of the legacy of the fleeting event. However, memory is mostly a personal experience, that shifts, mutates, and fades over time to become distant, different to its origin, and in this way its archival potential is unreliable. To overcome this dilemma a variety of lens-based archival methods have become the tradition of recording the ‘actual’ event in as far as it is possible. Although a recorder, of any variation, can provide footage that gives place and context of the archive document, they present a dilemma – how much do they indicate what it was like to ‘be there’. For recordings are mediated and translated for posterity through the direction of the person holding the device and document their viewpoint and subjective encounter with the work. This creates an archival document open to subjective discussion, as a memorial and work in its own right, and of which alternatives are often sought. It is in this way that the disciplinary ghettos of event and documentation are abandoned in favour of a mode of practice that allows for a greater level of mutual critique. For documentation is also subject to the same vagaries of time as the event itself. Concerned with the ephemeral and how it is perceived Peggy Phelan represents a position on this subject of “you have to be there” in order to understand the ephemeral. Phelan acknowledges that a performance “become[s] itself through disappearance.” This argument draws empathy, but in practice is a less than pragmatic account of the reality of experiencing ephemeral works, for how is the work to exist beyond the moment if not recorded in some way. The Alternative Document symposium, which accompanies the opening of the exhibition of the same name at University of Lincoln, seeks to expand on the idea of the ephemeral and its loss, by offering a platform where different acts of legacy can be witnessed and discussed. A guest edited edition of Studies in Theatre and Performance will be published from the project as a whole in the near future. The symposium was originated and led by Angela Bartram. The day coincided with the launch of the exhibition of the same name, and featured presentations by the artists in the exhibition (plus others). Tim Etchells delivered the symposium's keynote paper, and Jordan McKenzie gave a keynote performance to open the event at the same time as the launch of the accompanying exhibition on the evening of Friday 12 February 2016. Presenters: Tim Etchells, Jordan McKenzie, Annalaura Alifuoco, Hector Canonge, Ana Carvalho, Rachel Cherry, Luce Choules, Emma Cocker & Clare Thornton, Stewart Collinson, Kate Corder, Rochelle Haley, Min Kim, Sophie Kromholz, Anya Lifting, Chiara Passa, Andrew Pepper, Louise K Wilson. Created and led by Angela Bartram as part of the Alternative Document project. The symposium took place at Lincoln Performing Arts Centre, 12-13 February 2016.
    • Alternative schooling

      Flower, Annie; Cottle, Vanessa; University of Derby (Pearson Education Limited, 2011)
      This chapter provides you with a general introduction to approaches to education and school curricula by considering examples of schools from Europe and the USA, which have a role in providing alternative curricula to the English National Curriculum and also considers educational policy.
    • Amongst Barbarian: Ovid, the Classics and creative writing

      McCrory, Moy; University of Derby (Routledge, 2010-09)
      Despite still being viewed as a non-legitimate subject, Creative Writing has injected life into areas once considered essential to an education, but now under threat in many universities. At degree level it has created an opportunity to re-engage with the classics by its insistence on its own history, while its non-traditional methodologies provide a different way for students to engage with early texts. Ovid's Metamorphoses lends itself to Creative Writing development. Such students, who are used to engaging with a subject practically, will have been equipped with the tools necessary to work with this. Their creative mindset allows the main work of reinterpretation necessary for the study of such early stories. The study for clues which point towards earlier methods (repetition, formal patterns, framework structures) which occur in such primary literature allows students to realise the evolution of a story, and understand that this is never a static process, but one of continuous engagement which the Metamorphoses above all others, seems to welcome.
    • Antarctica: Live surround exploration

      Crossley, John; Lane, Kit; University of Derby (2016-02)
      A surround sound music composition by John Crossley inspired by the sounds of the Antarctic, with accompanying video sequences. Source material included survey data and images from various research institutes including NASA. As well as photographic and video images, geographical and geological data was manipulated to create original visualisations.
    • Appeals to semiotic registers in ethno-metapragmatic accounts of variation

      Penry Williams, Cara; La Trobe University (Victoria, Australia); University of Derby (Wiley, 2019-04-29)
      Discussions of folklinguistic accounts of language use are frequently focused on dismissing them because of their limitations. As a result, not a lot is written regarding how such accounts are done and how they ‘work’. This article examines how folklinguistic evaluations are achieved in interaction, particularly through appeals to semiotic registers (Agha 2007). It describes how in explaining their beliefs regarding linguistic variation, speakers frequently produce voicings with varying transparency. These rely on understandings of the social world and bring large collections of linguistic resources into play. They offer rich insights if analytic attention is given to their details because even when evaluating a single variant, whole ways of speaking, and even being, may be utilized. The paper explores in turn how analysis reveals the inseparability of variants, understandings of context and audience, the relationship between linguistic forms and social types, and the performance of social types via the evaluation of semiotic resources. In each section, discussion is grounded in extracts from interviews on Australian English with speakers of this variety of English. Cumulatively they show the primacy of semiotic registers in ethno-metapragmatic accounts.
    • Applied theatre solo performance: “Acting Alone” – artist led research exploring boundaries of performer / audience relationships

      Hunt, Ava; University of Derby (23/04/2016)
      Acting Alone is a solo performance based on seven years of artistic and creative research into the theatrical conventions used within Applied Theatre practice. Hunt’s solo performance research challenges the theatrical form, raises questions and provokes debate through the use of immersive conventions. Acting Alone toured extensively throughout the UK at festivals, theatre venues, in schools and colleges. The piece performed to a wide range of self-selecting audiences – age, class, religion, gender and cultural identity. Verbatim experiences of ordinary Palestinian people where told against documentary accounts of historical and autobiographical stories woven together to provide counter arguments against racist discourse. This applied theatre practice challenged the theatrical boundaries of performer/audience relationships through subtle moments of participation finishing with an invitation to make a difference.
    • Apprenticeship teaching in England: new practices, roles and professional formation for educators.

      Esmond, Bill; Centre of Educational Research and Innovation, University of Derby (2019-03-21)
      Whilst apprenticeships are generally supported by workplace trainers and by vocational teachers in schools or colleges, competency-based systems also allocate roles to third-party workplace assessors. Apprenticeship reforms in England, replacing qualification-based ‘frameworks’ with ‘employer-led standards’ have opened up possibilities for these assessors to carry out training duties, although these generally lack the qualifications and status of classroom-based teachers, having completed shorter courses in assessment and sometimes training practice. A qualitative study was carried out among practitioners who had begun to take on training responsibilities, exploring their emerging practices and identities. Participant responses varied in their apprehension of role change, partly because apprentices in more technical subjects would continue to study at colleges, whilst practice-based subjects would be entirely taught in the workplace. More generally, working within production constraints provided challenges implying not a minimal professional formation but a more direct engagement with the problems of educational practice within production environments.
    • Archivist, cataloguer, historian.

      Flint, Alison Claire; University of Derby (Women's History Network, 2015-09)
      This paper investigates the interrelationships between the nineteenth-century cataloguer, the twenty-first-century archivist and the historian, by focusing on the letter. Taking up Steven Fischer’s maxim to look beyond the obvious the paper considers the little used and un-investigated correspondence of the Ogston Estate families. A critical evaluation of the collection has indicated that this group of records can deliver more than a concise male orientated genealogical record or history of a Derbyshire country estate. The analysis questions why the majority of the surviving familiar letters in the Ogston collection were written by women, principally the wives, mothers and daughters of the Turbutt family. However, what makes this collection ever more interesting for the historian and most importantly to this study is it offers a unique insight into the methodologies adopted by one nineteenth-century family archivist, Edith Sophia Turbutt. Edith Sophia Hall married into the Turbutt family in 1879; twenty-five years later in 1904 Edith Sophia began to catalogue and record the history of her adopted family, the Turbutt family. The paper questions the nature and purpose behind Edith Sophia Turbutt’s agenda in cataloguing the ancestral correspondence of the Turbutt family line and asks was it a gender related pastime. It explores both the negative and positive impact of the methodologies used by Edith Sophia Turbutt in cataloguing the letters into bundles comprising individual family members rather than chronologically as a whole and asks what as a result is lost or gained. The paper investigates whether letter questions remain unanswered or replies appear as simple unrelated fact or if the continuity through the generations and extended family connections becomes distorted or indeed lost. In addition it inquires if Edith Sophia’s methods were the fashionable norm and further explores how and why gentry families were managing their own histories. The paper further argues that the modern archivist who accepts the early nineteenth-century cataloguing without attesting the dates or contents is not only compounding any past inaccuracies but adds further to the distortion of the evidence as whole, and as such, it considers the impact of such action on future generations of the family, and the historian; it goes on to question whether in recreating an/the imagined past the family historian or archivist past, present and future is guilty of misrepresenting the true nature of the facts.
    • Are my cognitive maps the same as yours? …or even, the same as mine?

      Lennox, Peter; University of Derby (29/01/2013)
      Cognitive map metaphors have become ubiquitous in diverse spatial perception research fields. Tolman's original 1948 formulation referred to way-finding in mazes, O'Keefe and Nadel described particular neural structures that can support spatial behaviours. Other usages may be more metaphorical and may even be incommensurate, one with the other. This talk was a discussion piece to compare and contrast current usages
    • Are training and education mutually exclusive?

      Lane, Kit; Lewis, Simon P.; University of Derby (2015)
      Stage’ at the PLASA London show, October 2015. Our talk was in response to a view held widely in the live event industry that degree level programs do not adequately prepare students for the industry. We outlined the approaches to real-world learning that we have applied over the years in the Sound, Light and Live Event Technology degree and the Technical Theatre Degree and described the Learning Theatre. We presented a number of case studies of high profile graduate destinations.
    • "An assemblage of habits": D. J. Waldie and Neil Campbell—a suburban conversation

      Waldie, D. J.; Campbell, Neil; University of Derby (Utah State, 2011)
    • Assessing the inclusivity of three mainstream secondary schools in England: challenges and dilemmas

      Dimitrellou, Eleni; Hurry, Jane; Male, Dawn; University of Derby; Institute of Education, University of Derby, Derby, UK; Department of Psychology and Human Development, Institute of Education, University of London, London, UK; Department of Psychology and Human Development, Institute of Education, University of London, London, UK (Taylor & Francis, 2018-08-21)
      The notion of inclusion has gained momentum worldwide, with most countries around the world embracing inclusive policies in their educational systems. However, there is still an ongoing debate as to what is inclusion and hence, the consequent challenge of coming up with an agreed definition, which could then be used to plan for and subsequently, evaluate, inclusion. This study adds to our understanding of inclusion by contrasting objective (i.e. School Census Statistics) and subjective (i.e. self- report questionnaire) measures of inclusivity in three mainstream secondary schools in England and by comparing the perceptions of school inclusivity of different groups of educational practitioners and pupils. The results of this study indicate that inclusion is a ‘slippery’ construct as the perception of inclusion of educational practitioners was found to be affected by their role at school while pupil perception on this matter depended upon their SEND category. However, despite these subjective differences in the way inclusion is perceived, there was also substantial agreement across the different categories of participants with regard to the relative ranking of inclusivity across the three schools suggesting that coming up with overarching themes on what is inclusion is achievable. The article ends with explaining the benefits of reaching an agreed definition at a national level.
    • Atlantis.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Sheffield; Go! Grafik; Pringle, Mat (Spirit Duplicator, 2015)
      An edited volume of eighteen pairs of artists and writers collaborating on illustrated creative work on the theme of Atlantis. I included a range of writers at different stages of their careers, from the public philosopher Angie Hobbs to undergraduate students. Cathy Shrank, Adam Piette, John Miller, Fabienne Collignon, Astrid Alben and Ágnes Lehóczky all contribute. The book is a two colour risograph print.