• Developing creativity in early childhood studies students.

      Yates, Ellen; Twigg, Emma; University of Derby (2016)
      The study aimed to identify Early Childhood Studies students’ perceptions of, and confidence in, their own creativity, in an East Midlands university in England; and the influence of practical, creative activities on their practice with children. The study was qualitative in nature, framed within the interpretative paradigm and based on a first year Play and Creativity module which includes practical creative activity and the development of skills to enhance confidence. The key role of the practitioner in supporting children’s creativity has been highlighted (Craft 2002, Wright 2010) alongside the need for skills and confidence in practitioners. (Aubrey and Dahl 2013, Chien and Hui 2010) A study group of 25 was opportunity sampled from the full cohort of 90. Students completed questionnaires at the beginning and end of the module, alongside self- reflection sheets after five practical activities. Results were coded and analysed thematically. The study complied with the institution’s ethical procedures and participation was voluntary. Students were free to withdraw at any point. The results indicated improvement in students’ confidence in their own creativity and their ability to apply the skills developed within their practice. Students developed a wider understanding of the nature of creativity, including the importance of the environment, resources and opportunities for children to explore . The module supported students’ professional skills, including, team working, listening skills, collaboration and the importance of reflection on practice. The study concluded that practical activities within the module should continue to form part of the Early Childhood Studies Degree programme.
    • Developing ethical geography students? The impact and effectiveness of a tutorial-based approach

      Healey, Ruth L.; Ribchester, Chris; University of Chester (Informa UK Limited, 2016-02-17)
      This paper explores the effectiveness of a tutorial based approach in supporting the development of geography undergraduates’ ethical thinking. It was found that overall the intervention had a statistically significant impact on students’ ethical thinking scores as assessed using Clarkeburn et al.’s (2003) Meta-Ethical Questionnaire (MEQ). The initiative led to a convergence of scores, having a bigger impact on those who had a relatively low score prior to the intervention. Interestingly the approach had the biggest impact on students who self-identified as physical geographers. Unlike some previous research there was little evidence of difference between male and female students.
    • Developing local narratives for objects in national collections: Lessons learned from the “Number Please? Working with the Enfield Exchange” project.

      Geoghegan, Hilary; McIlvenna, Kathleen; van der Vaart, Merel; Institute of Historical Research (Wiley, 2017-06-19)
      Museums of science, technology, and engineering are developing new ways of interpreting and displaying their collections. Increasingly objects are being placed within narratives of everyday use; the human side of technology. The focus of this article is a section of one of the last UK manual telephone switchboards, which was acquired by the Science Museum, London, following its decommissioning in 1960. This artifact offers a unique insight into a communication technology that relied extensively on female telephonists, a distinct way of understanding gender roles in the twentieth century. The authors explore strategies for developing local narratives for objects from national collections and reflect on lessons learned from a cross-institutional collaboration. This article highlights: the value of local historians, community events and oral histories to developing local narratives; how these activities informed understandings of the telephone switchboard; work life in the communications industry; the relationship between women and technology; and practical strategies that can enhance collections and museum practice through collaboration.
    • Developing your career: harnessing the power of the internet for “digital career management”

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Emerald, 2017)
      Purpose This paper aims to discuss the role of the internet in framing individual’s career building. It argues that the 7 Cs of digital career literacy offer a useful framework for those working in learning and development in organizations. Every individual needs to engage with the internet when thinking about how to manage and future-proof their careers. Learning and development (L&D) professionals can support employees to harness the power of the internet and learn how to make use of the new opportunities of “digital career management”. Design/methodology/approach This paper highlights steps that every individual needs to take for “digital career management” and pulls out the role of L&D professionals in addressing the developing internet context. Findings Sets out “7 C’s” for proactively managing a “digital career profile”. Originality/value The internet has shifted the context for career building and learning how to maximize the opportunities now offered is the central task for anyone wishing to carve out their future careers.
    • Découverte de l’artiste’ (discovering the artist): Finding Marion Adnams through her work with a focus on ‘Infante égarée

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (2018)
      This video installation expresses the process of research Marion Adnams' paintings and the paper model of Infante égarée in particular. A version of paper model from the original painting has been constructed and animated in order to understand the structure of the original paper doll and to emulate the movement that is implicit in its structure. The animation was then superimposed onto the original painting. Adnams described the figure as lost and wandering in the forest and this sense of dislocation is captured within the twisting movement of the figure and haunting soundtrack. The title of the painting is also restored to Adnams’ preferred French title. The video is part of the Marion Adnams Project and illustrates an interest in practice as a form of research. The video installation formed part of the ‘Marion Adnams: A Singular Woman’ retrospective at Derby Museums and Gallery (Dec 2017-March 2018).
    • Dialects of design education: Exploring an appropriate approach to contemporary interiors in historical buildings.

      Slabbert, Barend; Jordaan, June; Cape Peninsula University of Technology (Leadership Forum on Education, 03/12/2013)
      Due to economic adversities brought on by the global recession, rapid urbanisation of the developing world and the need for sustainable design, a pressing need has arisen to incorporate appropriate and meaningful contemporary interiors in historical buildings. Initial informants of this study identified a need for interior design students to develop awareness and suitable skills to design such regenerating contemporary interiors and that interior design curricula include these critical-analytical skills. This paper provides a conceptual framework that hopes to assist students to achieve the desired coherence contemporary interiors owe their historical environments through the design of multisensory environments. This will be done by exploring the notions of small narratives, neo-plasticism, stratification and detailing. By probing how these principles may be found in two case studies, Castelvecchio in Verona and Museum van de Caab outside Cape Town, this study hopes to indicate how multisensory environments may be analysed and designed.
    • Digitally-social genre fiction: Citizen authors and the changing power dynamics of writing in digital, social spaces.

      Johnson, Miriam J.; University of Derby; College of Arts, Humanities and Education, University of Derby, Derby, UK (Taylor and Francis, 2018-08-09)
      The growth of digitally social media has given rise to the citizen author, as an author who actively chooses to forgo the traditional publishing model and seeks instead to share their works among communities on social platforms. Taking into account the nature of the medium on which they write, they use genre fiction as a means to push the boundaries of what is expected of a ‘book’ or narrative structure. This article shows that, by pushing back against the structure of the author-agent-publisher model, these authors engender communities around their writing and develop relationships directly with readers. These digital villages proliferate around genre writing in online spaces, creating a shifting power dynamic between the publishing industry and the writers who choose to work in these digital spaces, blurring the differential between ‘high’ and ‘low’ art and addressing the issues of gender in genre fiction.
    • Discipline-based political theatre solo performance "Acting Alone" - Artist-led research exploring boundaries of performer/audience relationships

      Hunt, Ava; University of Derby (International Federation for Theatre Research, 2016-06)
      Over the last seven years I have been drawn to making solo performance theatre inspired by true stories/verbatim material that both challenge me as an artist and as a researcher but also pose questions to audiences but can theatre contribute to social and political change? Acting Alone explores how solo/interactive performance might create “affect” as a tool for promoting social responsibility and political engagement. This paper will set out some of the responses to the performances from touring the piece both nationally and internationally, theoretical frameworks I have engaged with and what questions continue to drive my research. This piece is inspired by my research with artists and educators in refugee camps in the West Bank. The title “Acting Alone” provides a duality - that of acting vs activism – political intervention against the vulnerability of performing alone on stage - would I be alone at the end of a performance or would an audience join me in the conversation, a response to the Israeli/Palestinian conflict? Originally commissioned by Amnesty International (Derbyshire) Acting Alone is informed by performance efficacy and participatory engagement theory. In its exploration of the complex situation faced by those living in Palestine, Acting Alone challenges the theatrical conventions often experienced by audiences. It invites them to interact: to cross the dramaturgical divide and create an ending where no-one, including the performer, knows the resolution. In a unique performance style, tales are woven together, personal stories and folklore tales offer insight and reflection but ultimately the piece poses questions -at times of conflict, do we take action? Whose side are we on? What are we willing to risk? And can one person make a difference?
    • Discovering intercultural communication: From language users to language use

      Kim, Hyejeong; Penry Williams, Cara; University of Melbourne, Australia; University of Derby; La Trobe University, Australia (Palgrave Macmillan / Springer, 2021-12-26)
      This textbook provides a succinct, contemporary introduction to intercultural communication with a focus on actual language use. With English as a lingua franca and Communicative Accommodation Theory as the underpinning concepts, it explores communication, language use, and culture in action. Each chapter includes discourse extracts so that students can apply what they have learned to real text examples, and supplementary instructor materials including suggestions for discussion points and activities are hosted on springer.com. The book will be key reading for students taking modules on Intercultural Communication or Language, Culture and Communication as part of a degree in Linguistics and Applied Linguistics, or English Language both at undergraduate and postgraduate level.
    • Discussing the applicability of soundfield techniques for larger audience entertainment

      Dickins, Glenn; Lennox, Peter; Dolby Laboratories; The Australian National University; University of Derby (Audio Engineering Society, 14/07/2016)
      Sound field reconstruction techniques for recreating immersive audio in entertainment applications are well established. However, these techniques and their underlying principles do no readily upscale to cover larger listening areas with a sizable number of either static or ambulant listeners. In this work, we review the theory and considerations of sound field control and contrast that to the requirements for creating a consistent experience across a large audience. An argument is made that precise sound field control is neither necessary or sufficient, and we propose key challenges and hybrid approaches for further research and development beyond sound field control.
    • Diversity and opportunity in the UK media industries

      Marsden, Stevie; University of Leicester (2019-01-14)
    • DNA / The hour we knew nothing of each other

      Lane, Kit; Baldwin, Naomi; University of Derby (2016-02)
      A variety of source material was used including original photographic and video images, computer generated imagery and Creative Commons licensed images. A single projector was used but a multiplicity of projection surfaces were targeted through use of projection mapping techniques. The video design was also used as part of research by a final year Theatre Arts
    • Documenting an educational imaginary – representations of schooling in British documentary films.

      Tupling, Claire; University of Derby (Либра Скорп (Libra Scorp), 2018-09-26)
    • Documents, Alternatives #1

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (Airspace Gallery, Stoke on Trent, 2017-11)
      ‘Documents, Alternatives #1’ is an exhibition presenting works by 15 internationally exhibited artists and artist collaborations. Built upon a series of time-based works that rely on performative process and created experience, the project 'Documents, Alternatives,' which comprises linked exhibitions (of which this is number 1), symposium and text, aims to resolve this issue by making the document and artwork reflexive. In doing this it acknowledges their need for change, so that they remain continuous and in process, through staging a practical and thought provoking visual discussion. Positioned to operate at the intersection of artistic and academic domains, the project is as creatively stimulating and progressively invigorating as theoretically interrogatory and analytical. This is an experimental, discursive curatorial strategy whereby the document becomes a new artwork and the artwork becomes a new document to keep the ephemeral evolving and in transition. ‘Documents, Alternatives #1’ and the project to which it belongs, are in response to, and as a continuation from the pilot exhibition that curated a selection of international artists’ work to demonstrate the ways in which ephemeral practice can be renewed through re-staging the document as new artwork. It is a re-drafting, re-configuration, re-grouping and re-working of this pilot, ‘The Alternative Document’ at Project Space Plus in Lincoln (13th February - 11th March 2016), and as such it continues the conversation and the lifespan of these works and their relation to others with the exhibition. The project and 'Documents Alternatives #1' are led and curated by Angela Bartram. Includes work by: Angela Bartram, Andrew Bracey, Brazier and Free, Luce Choules, Emma Cocker and Clare Thornton, Kate Corder, Steve Dutton, Tim Etchells, Rochelle Haley, Morrad + McArthur, Andrew Pepper, Louise K. Wilson. The exhibition was accompanied by an artist's talk at Staffordshire University in association with Airspace Gallery as part of Airspace Curriculum on 23 November 2017, and Bartram was commissioned for the window exhibition space, where a new video artwork 'Santa Dogs' showed throughout the duration of 'Documents, Alternatives #1.'
    • Documents, Alternatives #2

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (Verge Gallery, Sydney, 2018-01)
      The documentation of ephemeral artwork, works made to be transient, changeable and un-fixed, is often problematic for the intent and premise of creation as it aligns itself with a particular moment, place and viewpoint in time. Lens-based methods are mostly relied upon to communicate actuality and happening and to fix the un-fixed memory of the artwork, and this is part of that problem. Effectively, this type of documentary device works in opposition to the concept of the artwork, cementing into a fragmentary history when all it wants is to be fleeting in its temporarality. The lens-made recording tends to generalise vision and, by extension, it does not fully communicate the experience of ‘being there’ and present. Experience is difficult to replicate through a lens. This is problematic for artwork whose very premise is to be transient and time-based, and for which direct experience is a priority. ‘Documents, Alternatives’ is a collection of interlinked exhibitions that include time-based works reliant on performative process and created experience for understanding, which aim to resolve this issue by making the document and artwork reflexive. In doing this they acknowledge their need for change so to remain continuous and in process through staging a practical and thought provoking dialogue across venues. Positioned to operate at the intersection of artistic and academic domains, the project is as creatively stimulating and progressively invigorating as theoretically interrogatory and analytical. This is an experimental, discursive curatorial strategy whereby the document becomes a new artwork and the artwork becomes a new document to keep the ephemeral evolving and in transition. This is exhibition number 2 in the series. To be true to the nature of ephemera, the discursive environment that is ‘Documents Alternatives’ is curated to map a staging that is in ‘motion’ and responsive to artistic meaning and intention. Here, the artworks learn from their prior incarnations, and respond to a re-grouping with the others in the collection of ‘conversational’ exhibitions, of which they are now becoming familiar, and their own concepts to be kept very much in the present. Moving beyond traditional unsympathetic means used as sole mode of translation, it offers a more effective way of communicating the artwork by keeping it current and active, and by denying its relegation to the historic past. To do this it positions the artwork as document and new work simultaneously thereby creating a generating loop of reflexive and developing activity. The exhibitions foreground fluidity and diversity of translation and includes multiple art voices and modes of output including video, light and holography, text, painting, print, web work, ethnographic environmental trace, jam making, and sound. The 'Documents Alternatives' project is led and curated by Angela Bartram. Artists include: Tim Etchells, Andrew Pepper, Emma Cocker and Clare Thornton, Rochelle Haley, Kate Corder, Steve Dutton, Luce Choules, Morrad + McArthur, Brazier and Free, Andrew Bracey, Louise K. Wilson, and Angela Bartram. ‘Documents, Alternatives #2 was in the 5% of successful exhibition proposals for Verge Gallery's 2018 programme.
    • Documents, Alternatives #3

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (Bath School of Art and Design, Bath, 2018-04)
      The documentation of ephemeral artwork, works made to be transient, changeable and un- fixed, is often problematic for the intent and premise of creation as it aligns itself with a particular moment, place and viewpoint in time. Lens-based methods are mostly relied upon to communicate actuality and happening and to fix the un-fixed memory of the artwork, and this is part of that problem. Effectively, this type of documentary device works in opposition to the concept of the artwork, cementing into a fragmentary history when all it wants is to be fleeting in its temporarality. The lens-made recording tends to generalise vision and, by extension, it does not fully communicate the experience of ‘being there’ and present. Experience is difficult to replicate through a lens. This is problematic for artwork whose very premise is to be transient and time-based, and for which direct experience is a priority. ‘Documents, Alternatives’ is a collection of interlinked exhibitions that include time-based works reliant on performative process and created experience for understanding, which aim to resolve this issue by making the document and artwork reflexive. In doing this they acknowledge their need for change so to remain continuous and in process through staging a practical and thought provoking dialogue across venues. Positioned to operate at the intersection of artistic and academic domains, the project is as creatively stimulating and progressively invigorating as theoretically interrogatory and analytical. This is an experimental, discursive curatorial strategy whereby the document becomes a new artwork and the artwork becomes a new document to keep the ephemeral evolving and in transition. This is exhibition number 3 in the series. To be true to the nature of ephemera, the discursive environment that is ‘Documents Alternatives’ is curated to map a staging that is in ‘motion’ and responsive to artistic meaning and intention. Here, the artworks learn from their prior incarnations, and respond to a re- grouping with the others in the collection of ‘conversational’ exhibitions, of which they are now becoming familiar, and their own concepts to be kept very much in the present. Moving beyond traditional unsympathetic means used as sole mode of translation, it offers a more effective way of communicating the artwork by keeping it current and active, and by denying its relegation to the historic past. To do this it positions the artwork as document and new work simultaneously thereby creating a generating loop of reflexive and developing activity. The exhibitions foreground fluidity and diversity of translation and includes multiple art voices and modes of output, and the work is significantly adapted for this version from those previously staged at Airspace Gallery (Stoke on Trent, 2017) and Verge Gallery (Sydney, 2018). Artists include: Tim Etchells, Andrew Pepper, Emma Cocker and Clare Thornton, Rochelle Haley, Kate Corder, Steve Dutton, Luce Choules, Morrad + McArthur, Brazier and Free, Andrew Bracey, Louise K. Wilson, and Angela Bartram.
    • Documents, alternatives - a symposium of artistic process and practice.

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (20/04/2018)
      The documentation of ephemeral artwork, works made to be transient, changeable and un-fixed, is often problematic for the intent and premise of creation as it aligns itself with a particular moment, place and viewpoint in time. Lens-based methods are mostly relied upon to communicate actuality and happening and to fix the un-fixed memory of the artwork, and this is part of that problem. Effectively, this type of documentary device works in opposition to the concept of the artwork, cementing into a fragmentary history when all it wants is to be fleeting in its temporality. The lens-made recording tends to generalise vision and, by extension, it does not fully communicate the experience of ‘being there’ and present. This is problematic for artwork whose very premise is to be transient and time-based, and for which direct experience is a priority. ‘Documents, Alternatives (#3)’ is an exhibition that includes time-based works that rely on performative process and created experience, which aims to resolve this issue by making the document and artwork reflexive. In doing this it acknowledges their need for change so that they remain continuous and in process through staging a practical and thought provoking visual discussion. The symposium accompanies this exhibition at BSAD, and acts in response to process with artistic practice and the experience of the artwork. It situates a series of opportunities for the experience of process through a structure of colloquialism adjacent to the exhibition, to open the nature of artistic process to critical debate. To enable a dialogue about process (as that exhibited and that discussed) informed by both academic and creative domains, symposium speakers are the artists with work in the accompanying exhibition. Hosted by the Art Research Centre, Bath School of Art and Design BSAD Gallery and BSAD main Lecture theatre. The symposium is staged simultaneously with the exhibition Documents, Alternatives (#3) at BSAD gallery, which is open to the public 20th April – 1st May 2018. The exhibition and symposium are part of the Alternative Document, a project by Dr. Angela Bartram, Associate Professor and Head of Arts Research, at University of Derby.
    • “Does that mean I have to hump Monica?”: the sexual dynamics of a human / nonhuman dog pack.

      Bartram, Angela; Hurley, Paul; University of Derby; University of Southampton (Human-Animal Studies Conference, 2018-08)
      Jacques Derrida said that animal is a name humans “have given themselves the right and the authority to give to another creature. ” This agency of naming separates human from animal, humanity from animality, despite shared behavioural traits. Sex, and sexuality and being ‘in sex’ remind us of animal (in the human and the non-human) primal drives. The genitals reference ‘sex’ (as site, as pleasure, anatomically), and locate where dogs are ‘in heat.’ Dog or human, the heat of sexual enhancement is a force that ignites a biological drive at the expense of cognate sensibilities. It makes us animal, in spite of our species. What does is it to be ‘in heat,’ in the heat of the moment and subject to the impulses of another (species)? Be Your Dog, an interspecies collaborative project at KARST (2016), sees human and dog companions learn the others behaviours and establish empathy. Here, the dogs led the humans (astray) in performative interactions, including those of inter-gender experiences of neutered/intact and sexually receptive/non sexually interested, and a sexually ripe and ‘on heat’ female. This paper, a scripted conversation between Paul Hurley (Be Your Dog, participant) and Angela Bartram (organiser), analyses the investment of sexual tensions brought by the ‘in heat’ canine participant in the group, and her effect on the other dogs and humans.
    • Dogs and the elderly

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (09/04/2019)
      We seek comfort from other beings, which in the absence of other humans often finds a solution in relationships with dogs. The positivity for health is particularly relevant to the elderly, who may be especially isolated and emotionally vulnerable. Although sharing one’s life with a dog gives purpose and comfort, it also brings anxieties regarding care and separation should that relationship change or cease. For the elderly, this concerns being worried for the dog’s fate should they be separated by entering housing or care facilities, or by illness or death. This seminar discusses the dilemma of leaving a ‘burden’ through the art project ‘Dogs and the Elderly,’ which analyses the importance of the interspecies relationships for physical and emotional health and wellbeing.
    • Dogs and the elderly: significant cohabitation and companionship towards the end of life

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (29/04/2019)
      We seek comfort from other beings and this often finds a solution in our relationships with dogs. Walter Benjamin said “no single dog is physically or temperamentally like another,” which in part attests to our interspecies domestic closeness based on reliance and need. Nowhere is this seen more than in their companionship with the elderly. The positivity for health of a life with dogs is relevant to the elderly, those may feel isolated and vulnerable without another with whom to share life. Here, dogs become a vital companion, alleviating depression and isolation and giving a sense of usefulness. Although sharing one’s life with a dog gives purpose and comfort, it also brings anxieties regarding care and separation should that relationship change or cease. For the elderly, this concerns being worried of their dog’s fate should they enter managed housing or care facilities, or if separated by illness or death. The ‘burden’ they would leave sees the elderly intentionally deny homing another dog should theirs die. This denial renders the dog a last memorial to the significance of the companionship that informed life. This presentation discusses my art project ‘Dogs and the Elderly’ that focuses on the significance and benefit of interspecies companionship towards the end of life. This project with the Alzheimer’s Society demonstrates how interspecies cohabitation is valuable for emotional health and wellbeing. Participants offer heart-warming and heart- breaking accounts of a lonelier and dog-free life when their current companion becomes their last. The fear of not being able to ensure safe continuing care produces a self-imposed loneliness, one where it seems better to know they will not commit a dog to an unknown future than to benefit from their friendship now. The dog becomes the living remains of a relationship that can no longer be accommodated.