• Water-fountain-sculpture

      Locke, Caroline; Wermers, Nicole; Pye, William; Janzing, Godehard; Bussman, Valerie; German Forum for Art History; University of Derby (Henry Moore Institute, 28/01/2017)
      This seminar event explored how water and fountains have been used by artists and sculptors for a variety of purposes. The afternoon began with a discussion of Marcel Duchamp's 'Fountain' (1917) and examined more recent examples of water sculpture such as the memorial at Ground Zero. In collaboration with Dr Godehard Janzing (Deutsches Forum für Kunstgeschichte), Valerie Bussmann (independent), Nicole Wermers (artist), William Pye (artist) and Caroline Locke (artist). Godehard Janzing discussed ‘Falling Waters at Ground Zero: when Terrorism turns into Nature’ and how the use of the symbolism of water becomes problematic in this context. Valerie Bussmann continued the theme of the city with an examination of the relationship Paris has with water as both necessity and art. Water as a sculptural material was explored by Nicole Wermers, focusing specifically on her 2011 series ‘Wasserregal’ (‘Watershelves’). William Pye has long been inspired by water and first introduced it as a major sculptural element in his work in the 1980s. Caroline Locke shared the themes of water and vibration, which have formed a key part of her practice and focused on her use of water in connection with her Performing Data projects. She has used her water fountains to animate certain data sets in connection with the human body and environmental data.
    • We will not disrupt your education.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (University of Leeds, 2011)
    • What do researchers do? Career profiles of doctoral graduates

      Hooley, Tristram; Videler, Tennie; CRAC (The Careers Research and Advisory Centre (CRAC), 2009)
    • What does good careers advice look like?

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Westminster Employment Forum, 2015)
    • What teachers need to know

      Hardman, Alison; University of Derby (2016-07-07)
      Set within the current context of teaching and teacher education, this presentation will explore what at first glance seems a simplistic question: What do Teachers Need to Know? Drawing upon some pertinent international perspectives and implications for practice, the presentation will reflect upon important philosophical viewpoints that serve to frame perceptions of teacher knowledge. By addressing some of the wider political, professional and pedagogical considerations allied to this focus, the presentation raises some key questions for the very future of the profession.
    • What works in careers and enterprise?

      The Careers & Enterprise Company; Hooley, Tristram; The Careers & Enterprise Company (The Careers & Enterprise Company, 2016)
      The Careers & Enterprise Company believes that young people should be given the best support available to develop their careers and to make choices about education and employment.
    • White t-shirt, black marker: mapping the undergraduate body.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Sheffield (2008)
      A film about students in Sheffield.
    • Who Are We, Where Do We Come From, Where Are We Going To? Greek Cypriot Women Artists in Contemporary Cyprus

      Photiou, Maria; Loughborough University (Taylor & Francis Publishers, 2012)
      This article is about Greek Cypriot women artists. In particular it concerns their art, their careers, and their relation to politics; the way they were influenced by politics in Cyprus and how they represented the political upheavals of the time in their own practice. Although all these artists experienced the several phases of Cypriot history in a different way, they all have something in common: the fact that these artists were women living in a colonised, patriarchal country under Greek Cypriot nationality. Their practices are the result of what they experienced and an analysis of their work will reveal the artistic strategies they applied as a response to the politics in Cypriot society.
    • Who do you want me to be? An exploration of female and male perceptions of imposed gender roles in the early years

      Brownhill, Simon; Oates, Ruby (Taylor and Francis, 2016-03-24)
      This paper provides an exploratory discussion surrounding the views and experiences of women and men who work/train in the early years (0-8 years) by bringing together select findings from two independent doctoral research projects. In an effort to weave together the voices of females and males working/training in the early years sector, this paper focuses its attention on the different ways in which their working roles are constructed and the possible ways in which this leads to the imposition of gender roles upon professionals in the 0-8 workforce in England.
    • Who groks Spock? Emotion in the neoliberal market.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Sheffield (Lawrence and Wishart, 2015-04)
      Creative non-fiction essay that casts Spock as Homo economicus. Commissioned by Radical Future (a series of political books published by Lawrence & Wishart).
    • Who wins the rat race? Social justice and the graduate labour market

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Graduate Prospects Ltd., 2015-10)
    • Why are there no great women artists? The positioning of women artists within fine art and craft.

      Yates, Ellen; University of Derby (2018-03-07)
      Nochlin‘s 1971 essay Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists? highlighted the barriers that women have faced within the world of fine art to be recognised , valued and exhibited. These include socio cultural and socio- economic factors, access to education, space, time and institutional barriers. Dominant discourses around the positioning of women’s work draw upon the status of the artist as ‘amateur’ or ‘professional’, alongside continuing debates in relation to the fine art/ craft divide and the status afforded to each. The dominance of the gendered masculine ideal , encompassing an ‘artist as genius’ stereotype pervades, despite advances in the public face of women’s art. (Korsmeyer 2004) This has led many women (and increasingly men) to seek refuge in the domain of craft as a more fruitful platform for exploring ideas. Women artists have used the visual language of craft to explore political ideas and to disrupt, challenge and parody dominant discourses about what can be considered ‘fine art’ and what it is to be ‘an artist’. This paper will explore these ideas in relation to examples of women’s work in the recent past in fine art and craft and contemporary work. The utilisation of craft by men will also be considered. The paper will conclude with an exploration of what is required to be a successful ‘artist’ in today’s world of self -promotion, online galleries and entrepenurship.
    • Why use mimeograph?

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (2016)
    • Why women don’t win literary awards: the saltire society literary awards and implicit stereotyping

      Marsden, Stevie; University of Leicester (Taylor and Francis, 2019-02-01)
      The purpose of this analysis is to consider the Saltire Society’s Book of the Year and First Book of the Year Awards in relation to wider issues pertaining to media representations of Scottish literary and publishing culture. Through a statistical analysis of the Society’s Book of the Year and First Book of the Year shortlists and winners between 1988 and 2014, this examination shows the extent to which the Society’s Literary Awards reflect, as opposed to subvert, historic and existing gender imbalances in Scottish literary and publishing culture. Indeed, despite critics arguing that there was a change in tide in the late 1980s and early 1990s regarding the balance in gender representation in Scottish literature, this analysis suggests that Scotland’s book award culture, and in turn, literary culture more widely, remains dominated by men. Perceptions of the apparent ‘balancing’ of the gender disparity in Scottish writing do not align with the statistics discussed here, a fact further evidence by misconceptions held by members of the Society’s own Literary Awards judging panels. Accordingly, this article contends that such inconsistencies lend credence to the argument that the Society’s judges have participated in implicit stereotyping based upon culturally pervasive stereotypes’ that Scottish women writers play a ‘minor’ role in Scottish literary and publishing culture.
    • "The widows and orphans of servants are dying": The conflict of family in the design and application of nineteenth-century civil servant pensions

      McIlvenna, Kathleen; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019-04-22)
      The Post Office is a Victorian institution. There had of course been postal systems before this time and in other places but the idea that all people in all places should be connected through the mail was a new idea. In the context of this volume, the existence and development of the Post Office network matters for two reasons. Firstly, because letters connected families and kin who were not proximately resident, and they also had the capacity to make notional kinship into a functional resource. In chapters by Steven King, Cara Dobbing and Geoff Monks elsewhere in this volume it is clear that whatever the co-residential family unit might have looked like, letters were a vital mechanism for conveying information, renewing and repairing kinship bonds and giving meaning to the fictive kinship networks that are the focus of the work of Naomi Tadmor. Secondly, in order to provide this service large (and increasing) numbers of employees were needed. This inevitably means that the nature of work for Post Office was a potent force in shaping family life, the nature of family relations and (in the sense that for some employees the Post Office acted as an alternate family) the very meaning of terms such as ‘family’ or ‘kin’. Moreover, in the sense that Post Office workers rapidly became part of a wider nineteenth-century movement for employers to provide superannuation schemes, we might expect the service to have shaped the long-term planning of family life and even the likelihood of re-marriage or the timing of children leaving home.
    • William Melville: Eve of war

      McMahon, Daithi; O'Connor, Fred; University of Derby (Raidió Chiarraí Teoranta, 08/01/2015)
      This detective drama was written and produced to educate the Irish audience about one of their greatest historical heroes, the spymaster William Melville, a.k.a. ‘M’, whose exploits have been largely overlooked by historians. The script, audio style, performances and soundscape were carefully designed to recreate the classic detective radio dramas of the 1940s, offering a unique nostalgic experience for the listener, rarely heard on radio today. Synopsis: It’s 1914. Europe is on the brink of a war that will define the 20th century, and the fledgling British Secret Service, under the command of Kerryman William Melville, must stop a German spy ring operating covertly throughout London before they carry out their deadly operation. Based on real events this drama recreates the plot that pitted the legendary detective, who hailed from Sneem, Co. Kerry, against the Kaiser's ruthless spymaster, Gustav Steinhauer. Once colleagues but now adversaries, each man will stop at nothing to complete his mission. The German plot is to destroy the gold reserves in the Bank of England, thereby shattering Britain's economy and severely hampering or nullifying Britain's war effort. The events are thought to have inspired Ian Fleming to write his best-selling James Bond novel Goldfinger. This programme is part of a special ongoing series of dramas on spymaster William Melville. This production was selected to compete for the Prix Europa 2016 in the Radio Fiction category and won Silver for Best Radio Drama at the New York Festivals International Radio Program Awards 2016.
    • William Melville: The Queen's detective.

      McMahon, Daithi; O'Connor, Fred; University of Derby (Radio Kerry, 2014-05)
      In this classic detective drama, set in the summer of 1889, Melville’s skills are put to the test as he is assigned to protect the visiting Shah of Persia as Fenian anarchists aim assassinating the royal guest. This drama is based on actual events and creates an intriguing insight into the world of political intrigue, criminality, and espionage that would have existed in late Victorian London. The drama was produced for the audience in county Kerry where William Melville was from and was intended to educate and entertain the listeners young and old about one of the county's most decorated sons.
    • With a little help from my friends: The Irish radio industry's strategic appropriation of social network sites for commercial growth.

      McMahon, Daithi; University of Derby (IGI Global, 2017)
      Ireland has faced significant economic hardship since 2008, with the Irish radio industry suffering as advertising revenues evaporated. The difficult economic circumstances have forced radio station management to devise new and cost effective ways of generating much-needed income. The answer has come in the form of Facebook, the leading Social Network Site (SNS) in Ireland. Using Ireland as a case study, this chapter looks at how radio station management are utilising the social network strategically in a bid to enhance their audiences and revenues. Radio station management consider Facebook to be an invaluable promotional tool which is very easily integrated into radio programming and gives radio a digital online presence, reaching far greater audiences than possible through broadcasting. Some radio stations are showing ambition and are realising the marketing potential that Facebook and other SNSs hold. However, key changes in practice, technology and human resources are required to maximise the profit-making possibilities offered by Facebook.
    • Work based assessment of teamwork: an interprofessional approach.

      Thistlethwaite, Jill; Forman, Dawn; Dunston, Roger; Moran, Monica Catherine; University of Derby (Office for Learning and Teaching Australia, 2015)
      This report Work-based assessment of teamwork: an interprofessional approach describes the Office for Learning and Teaching (OLT) funded project of the same name. It focuses on the rationale for, the development of and the piloting of a tool for observing and giving feedback on an individual student’s behavior in an interprofessional team based activity. The study was conducted during 2012–2014 with a project team initially led by the University of Queensland, and included team members from five Australian universities in three states (University of Queensland, University of Technology Sydney, The University of Sydney, Central Queensland University and Curtin University), as well as from the UK (University of Derby) and Canada (University of British Columbia).