• The same sky - A musical

      Ellis, Daniel; University of Derby; Harvey, Tim; Baggaley, Phil (Guildhall Theatre, 28/06/2016)
      THE SAME SKY is a ‘live’ on-going Musical Theatre project. This research investigates, from the perspective of the composer, the entire creative and technical process of producing a musical, from conception through to performance. The creative collaborative dialogue between composer, author and theatrical director in the production of a new musical will be presented and discussed. Each step has been documented allowing the investigation of the developmental mechanisms, planning, communication and practicalities involved in the launching of such a project. Considerations of the technical practicalities, theatrical possibilities within constrained budgets and how these also effect the compositional and artistic decisions made. It additionally explores the subjective nature of the creative process and questions how the combination of tried and tested compositional methodologies might combine with newer creative skill sets to ignite the development and evolution of a new project. Each step along the production timeline will be illustrated with musical examples to offer insight into the creative process. It is hoped that the research will demonstrate that it is indeed possible to produce a musical with little experience of the genre, providing the appropriate supporting expertise is in place; but this should not diminish the author’s many years experience in the related area of song-writing without which such a venture would be ill-advised.
    • Scent of a Woman; A screen-printed artists publication

      McNaney, Nicki; University of Derby (2015-06)
      This publication was developed to explore the creation of multiples through the hand printed process, researching the traditional use of printmaking in a contemporary artists book format. Ideas surrounding the theme of ‘Lost and Found” were developed initially using the medium of collage and drawing and then taken forward into screen-print. The concertina book was initiated as a response to the sub-heading “ scent of a woman ‘ that illustrated the research and investigation, commenting on the perfume recipes that have been lost and found over the years within the Parisian perfume houses. The artist books serves as a vehicle to document these findings a more abstract way, inviting the viewer the opportunity to debate the narrative of the artist book, with no beginning or end.
    • School belonging among young adolescents with SEMH and MLD: the link with their social relations and school inclusivity

      Dimitrellou, Eleni; Hurry, Jane; University of Derby; Institute of Education, University of Derby, Derby, UK; Department of Psychology and Human Development, Institute of Education, University of London, London, UK (Taylor & Francis, 2018-08-20)
      Despite the considerable institutional changes schools have made to accommodate the individual needs of pupils with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND), as underpinned by key principles of inclusion, there is still international concern about the mainstream experiences pupils with SEND have in school settings. This study helps us understand the schooling experiences of pupils with behavioural difficulties and learning difficulties by investigating whether they have a sense of belonging and positive social relations and whether these vary according to the level of inclusiveness of the school ethos at the institution they attend. Perceived social relations and feelings of belonging of 1,440 (282 SEND) young adolescents from three secondary mainstream settings that differ in inclusivity, were analysed using a self-reporting questionnaire. Findings demonstrated that pupils with SEND are not a homogeneous group, as pupils with behavioural difficulties were found to have less of a sense of belonging, and social relations than those with learning difficulties. It was also found that the sense of belonging of both groups is associated with their positive perceived relations with teachers and their inclusiveness of school ethos. These findings contribute as they offer ways of enhancing the sense of belonging of pupils with behavioural and learning difficulties in schools.
    • A school for our community: Critically assessing discourses of marginality in the establishment of a free school

      Tupling, Claire; University of Derby (Policy Press, 2017-06-28)
      In 2010 the Coalition Government announced its flagship Free School policy. Designed to be responsive to the needs of local communities, Free Schools are state funded and independent of local authority control. Adding to a diverse school system, the UK Government claims Free Schools increase the availability of ‘good’ schools, therefore providing greater choice for parents. The stated aim of this educational reform is to raise standards and narrow the attainment gap by targeting under-performance in disadvantaged areas. However, social justice concerns have suggested that Free Schools may not reflect the diversity of local communities, attracting the least disadvantaged pupils and therefore failing to offer increased educational opportunities for the most disadvantaged pupils despite the requirement that their admission criteria are fair and transparent. A limited number of recent studies of the Free Schools policy have used statistical data in assessing the extent of social segregation and how admissions criteria can result in a segregated intake, suggesting that these schools may indeed be serving pupils from more advantaged backgrounds. This chapter adds to that discussion by exploring the nebulous nature of the term ‘community’ in relation to the establishment of a Free School in, the community of Newtown (a pseudonym) in the North East of England. Drawing on Anderson’s concept of ‘imagined communities’ this chapter will demonstrate how the term ‘community’ has been employed in key documents written by the Newtown Free School proposers to identify and secure a school for pupils within Newtown. Newtown will be revealed as a relative socially advantaged community, but one where marginalisation, associated with schooling, is claimed to characterise the lives of the young people living there. As a consequence a Free School is proposed to tackle this marginalisation and create a community.
    • 'Sedimented histories' and 'embodied legacies': Creating an evaluative framework for understanding public engagement with the First World War

      Allwork Larissa; University of Derby (UCL IOE Press, 2020-02-01)
      This article reflects on the development of a new methodological framework for the evaluation of the impact of the Centre for Hidden Histories, one of the Arts and Humanities Research Council's First World War Engagement Centres. It shows how through evaluative processes such as academic and community partner Shared Experience Workshops, and community-focused Reflection Workshops, the historical, social, cultural and economic benefits of the centre can be highlighted. It also demonstrates how public engagement in these community history projects has resulted in the identification of new 'embodied legacies' (Facer and Enright, 2016) and heretofore marginalized 'sedimented histories' (Lloyd and Moore, 2015). These lessons in evaluation can be taken forward to inform future national commemorative moments, such as the centenary of the Second World War.
    • Seeing in: Two-fold, three-fold?

      Robinson, Carl; University of Derby (Mac Birmingham, 29/11/2016)
      Taking Richard Wollheim’s theory that seeing pictures is a two-fold experience of perception, (between the marked surface of the physical object and something depicted in its surface), this paper analyses my recent practice of creating artworks that place painted marks directly onto photographic prints of paint marks as a means of challenging the viewer as to what exactly is being seen in the picture. This conjoined photographic / painting practice also builds on Regina-Nino Kurg’s assertion that there is, in fact, a three-fold perceptual experience in seeing pictures. That is, seeing the physical object that is the picture - its configuration, whilst simultaneously seeing the object depicted in the picture - its representation, and the subject of the picture - its figuration. The research opens debates around the perceptual differences of seeing in the photographic image, which contains both representation and figuration; seeing in the painted image, which can contain either representation or representation and figuration; and seeing in the picture comprising of both the photographic and the painted. It is at the point of physical conjunction between photograph and paint that the question of multiple-‘foldness’ becomes particularly complex, and which this paper will begin to explicate. This particular research-based practice aims to illuminate an aspect of my overarching PhD research question, ‘To what degree can an art practice of painting onto digital photographic prints illuminate the ontological relationship between representational painting and photography in the digital age’?
    • Seeking best practice for education and training in the recording studio

      Vandemast-Bell, Paul; Werner, Duncan; Crossley, John; University of Derby (Audio Engineering Society, 20/08/2015)
      This paper reflects on the delivery of a module in recording studio practice. The module is intended to equip level 5 students with the necessary skills to undertake final year project work whilst introducing aspiring recording artists and music producers to a career in industry. These goals are compounded by the expectations of accreditation bodies that work in partnership with academic institutions to raise the standard of graduates entering into the business of music recording and production. Drawing on the authors’ educative experiences and observations the paper highlights the challenges posed by the tension between training and education, and investigates the potential for novel approaches to curriculum design.
    • Self-harm - dispelling the myths.

      Davey, Ang; Davey, Anna; University of Derby (Routledge, 2017-08-23)
    • ‘The self-improving primary school’: understanding and approaching teacher inquiry: a pilot study

      Poultney, Val; University of Derby (University of Cumbria, 2016-01)
      This paper examines how one primary school in the East Midlands region has worked to establish a culture of teacher-led, evidence-based teacher inquiry. It reports on a pilot year of research when the senior leadership team (SLT) decided to implement a strategic focus on evidence-based teaching, which would generate their own school knowledge, equip teachers to take more responsibility for their own teaching and professional development and to broaden their local and national networks. The SLT led the inquiry process using various initiatives as suggested vehicles for inquiry with the aim of galvanising teaching staff into making changes to their pedagogical approaches. Working with a local HEI academic as supporter of this process and advisor to the Head teacher, appropriate practice-based methodologies were deployed, trialled, role-modelled and evaluated by the SLT. A local HEI academic advised the SLT on the implementation of this approach, which was followed up by a small scale piece of research and evaluation to further inform the evidence base.
    • A sense of becoming and alienation: the retrospective in the work of Jordan McKenzie.

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby; School of Arts, College of Arts, Humanities and Education, University of Derby, Derby, UK (Taylor and Francis, 15/08/2018)
      The act of art retrospective, specifically that placed within a museum or gallery, is to reflect on, and give knowledge of something past. Retroactive in its overview of an artist’s practice, it is inherently backwards facing rather than future focused. As an act that specifies finiteness and conclusion, a living artist’s retrospective produces an ananomaly. In 2016, I simultaneously staged the Alternative Document symposium and exhibition. This included Retrospective 2027 by Jordan McKenzie, an event set in the future and staged by a living artist. Positioned as a keynote in the symposium rather than the exhibition it not only offered the retrospective as a representation of the artworks of the living, but also challenged traditional formats of structural placement. Situated within colloquialism rather than exhibition, the aim was to set it adrift from the gallery to open it to critical analysis and debate. This essay considers McKenzie’s approach to retrospective and how it differs from the conventional. Including my critical conversation with the artist, his performed, gestural and event-based approach is discussed for how it differs from the regular model of exhibition. The essay discusses the implications for the documentation of performance and the retrospective in McKenzie’s work.
    • Sensory augmentation through tissue conduction

      Lennox, Peter; McKenzie, Ian; University of Derby (InTech, 18/10/2017)
      One hundred volunteers have undergone short (5 min) listening tests in a novel multi-transducer bone-and-tissue conduction apparatus for spatial audio. The subjects subsequently described their experiences in an unstructured qualitative elicitation exercise. Their responses were aggregated to identify key themes and differences. Emergent themes are: enjoyable, informative, spatial and strange. Tactile supplementation of spatial audio display was noted in a positive light. We note that some spatial attributes are more perceptible than others. The implications for perceptual augmentation are discussed, particularly in relation to conductive hearing deficits. We conclude that the technique has potential for development and discusses future research directions.
    • Sexuality and sexualization in childhood (Mexico).

      Salinas-Quiroz, Fernando; Universidad Pedagogica Nacional (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2019)
    • The shape of my thoughts

      Baggaley, Phil; Brown, Michael; Bosward, Marc; Poynton, Stuart; Thorpe, Hayley; University of Derby (2016-03)
      An immersive multimedia Installation consisting of multi-channel Ambisonics surround-sound audio and animated 3D projection. Our intention was to produce a multimedia installation incorporating the animation of avian-like murmuration events synchronised to sound and music. The primary objective was to construct an audio/visual experience that loosely expresses an absent narrative. We wanted to explore the dynamics of multidisciplinary collaboration observing and recording the exchanges and expressive negotiations between composers and animators to produce an immersive expressive design. The piece employed large-scale digital projection and ambisonic surround sound. The installation was also displayed as part of the at ‘Nature Connections’ Festival in September 2015 and was featured on BBC’s Autumn Watch red button content. More recently, the piece was presented at the The International Festival for Innovations in Music Production and Composition at Leeds College of Music. The piece is the first installment of a planned trilogy of works that will extend and develop the collaborative experimentation with animation and sound in the production of immersive installation and performance.
    • Shared futures: Early career academics in English studies

      Watkins, Stephen; Jones, Clara; Egan, Clare; English, Elizabeth; Ras, Ilse A.; Kings College London; Lancaster University; Cardiff Metropolitan University, Wales; University of Leeds; University of Southampton (Boydell and Brewer Limited, 2018-10)
      The study of English literature, language, culture and creative writing is an important and dynamic enterprise. English: Shared Futures celebrates the discipline's intellectual strength, diversity and creativity, explores its futures in the nations of the UK and across the world, and brings together the huge scholarly, cultural and social energy of the biggest subject in the Arts and Humanities in Higher and in Secondary education: the most staff, the most students. It represents the synergies produced when practitioners and students from across the discipline come together, and aims to enable new understanding of the challenges that the discipline faces within schools and universities, the vital cultural and political role that English plays, and a renewed appreciation of the intellectual vitality and commitment of its scholars and students. Overall, it demonstrates the rich ecosystem of a subject crucial to social, cultural, and economic well-being, and offers ways in which its vitality can be ensured in the face of new challenges within and beyond the academy.
    • A shot in the arm for teacher education within FE

      Walker, Ben; University of Lincoln (2016-06)
    • Showman of the screen: Joseph E. Levine and his revolutions in film promotion.

      McKenna, Anthony Thomas; University of Derby (University Press of Kentucky, 23/09/2016)
      Joseph E. Levine was one of the most recognisable figures in post-War American cinema; he pioneered saturation opening techniques, revolutionised art-film marketing, and was hugely successful as a producer. He dealt in every conceivable type of film, from arthouse to exploitation to blockbusters, and became the famous film promoter in America. Showman of the Screen is the first book to fully investigate Levine's life and work, detailing his life and extraordinary career in the film industry, and focussing on what he called his "peculiar talent" for movie exploitation and showmanship. Based on extensive archival research and interviews with many of Levine's collaborators, this book positions Levine as the most versatile film promoter, and self-promoter, of his generation. Showman of the Screen details Levine's tough upbringing in the slums of Boston, and his subsequent journey from being provincial movie exhibitor to becoming the best-known movie showman in America. The book also shows how Levine was able to capitalise on emerging cultural trends, whilst also maintaining his reputation as a maverick by fiercely guarding his independence and deliberately provoking condemnations from cultural commentators. This book acts as a corrective to the many histories of post-War American cinema that either ignore or underestimate Levine's achievements and influence. His multifarious appetites ensured that his presence was felt in all genres, and that is influence is still with us today is testament to his position as one of the most important pioneering figures in America post-War cinema.
    • Sigma7 – Rosetta

      Crossley, John; University of Derby; Lane, Kit (2014)
      Live performance of original composition using multichannel surround sound system. Exploring the interaction of composition with multichannel sound performance and incorporating audience experience.
    • Singing Pools

      Locke, Caroline (17/04/2013)
    • The sister arts: Textile crafts between paint, print, and practice

      Gowrley, Freya; University of Derby (Wiley, 2020-02-05)
      This article explores intersections between portraiture, printed genre images, and conduct literature in late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Britain, focusing on representations of needlework between these cultural forms. In extant scholarship, needlework has been characterised as an important site of debate, a discursive locus wherein the qualities of appropriate femininity were sketched out and redefined. This article centres on the very mechanisms by which this discourse operated, arguing that visual and literary images of needlework were central to the creation of a grammar of respectable femininity, a symbolic language that simultaneously advocated maternal instruction, domestic industry, and marital eligibility.
    • Skittish

      Watts, Lisa; May, Lucy; University of Derby (Spacex Gallery, 2013-10)
      Skittish researches curatorial models for performance art in the white cube gallery space for the regular day-time viewers. Skittish is three exhibitions and is the first stage of two stages in this research. Each set of curators at each of the three galleries collaborated with me curate a sculptor alongside my art. The proposition was that all art forms of sculpture, video and performance, hold similar artistic concerns and artistic processes. An 'outside eye/ researcher' was employed, Joanne Lee, who is a Senior Lecturer at Sheffield Hallam University in Graphic design. She interviewed the curators, artists and myself throughout the three exhibitions.