• Old ways, new ways: Theatre artists peopling the media in Uganda

      Kasule, Samuel; University of Derby (African Theatre Association, 2018)
    • Olivia Dunham and the new frontier in fringe

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (McFarland, 2019-07-12)
      From the Star Wars expanded universe to Westworld, the science fiction western has captivated audiences for more than fifty years. These twelve new essays concentrate on the female characters in the contemporary science fiction western, addressing themes of power, agency, intersectionality and the body. Discussing popular works such as Fringe, Guardians of the Galaxy and Mass Effect, the essayists shed new light on the gender dynamics of these beloved franchises, emphasizing inclusion and diversity with their critical perspectives.
    • On going out and the experience of students.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018)
      Proposes a model for undergraduate culture in the night-time economy, mapping three stages from an HEI-centric culture into a heterogeneous culture and finally a homogenous culture, as youth culture and the night-time economy develop through the twentieth century.
    • On rigidity, Reus and Reich.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (2016)
    • On the water

      Cheeseman, Matthew; Cheeseman, Matthew; Southampton Solent University (Solent Press, 2017-04)
      On The Water is a collection of prose, non-fiction, performance writing and poetry, which has been written and assembled by writers from Southampton. The book is arranged to take the reader on a journey. It's not organised into sections of prose or poetry but from the feel of the pieces. We begin with the most emotional and personal pieces and end with the most universal and abstract. This is our own interpretation of being 'on the water'. I wonder what the woman whose voice is blared through loudspeakers across the country is like herself. I wonder if she's even alive, I wonder how she'd feel knowing her voice announced deaths a dozen times a day in the most loosely veiled code commuters know. I wonder how many voices break a year to her voice.
    • On the water.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; Southampton Solent University (Solent Press, 2017)
      A creative writing journal for Southampton Solent University, featuring the work of staff, students and local residents. It was designed through collaboration with Go! Grafik and students.
    • Only a "scrap of paper": The prison reading of British conscientious objectors, 1916-1919

      Feely, Catherine; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015)
    • Only qualifications count: Exploring perceptions of continuing professional development (CPD) within the career guidance sector.

      Neary, Siobhan; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS); University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2016-05-03)
      This paper explores the views of a group of career development practitioners undertaking a postgraduate qualification as a form of continuing professional development (CPD). It offers insights into how these practitioners perceive and view different forms of CPD. A case study methodology was adopted to gather examples of CPD activities practitioners engaged in and the value placed on these in supporting the development of professional practice. Their views were synthesised to create a typology representing a differentiated model of CPD. The model proposes three types of CPD: operational, experiential and formal. Formal CPD is perceived as having the highest value in developing professional practice. The study supports a deeper understanding of how careers practitioners engage with and understand CPD.
    • Opening up the debate: Irish radio, Facebook, and the creation of transnational cultural public spheres.

      McMahon, Daithi; University of Derby (Transcript Verlag, 02/10/2018)
      Radio has become an increasingly digitised medium in recent years with a growing online presence becoming ever more integral to the medium’s output and identity. Furthermore, it has become integral to radio stations’ audience recruitment and retention strategies. While radio has long been a platform for on-air public debate and discourse, the limitations of technology always meant that only a limited number of listeners could take part. The largest social network site, Facebook, now provides the infrastructure for public spheres to exist online which means a much wider audience can participate and contribute to discussions and debates including the extensive Irish diaspora – which has grown significantly as a cohort since 2008 due to mass emigration – making it a transnational phenomenon. Using the Irish radio industry and Radio Kerry as a case study this research found that although some instances of traditional Habermasian public spheres exist on radio station Facebook pages, such instances were very limited. Instead audiences are participating in what closely resemble cultural public spheres (McGuigan 2005) where the topics of discussion are of a cultural, social or emotional nature, eschewing debates on current affairs/public issues. This chapter looks at the use of Facebook for audience recruitment and retention from an Irish context and within that is focused on the local commercial radio station Radio Kerry. The methodology included textual analysis of Facebook page content, interviews with industry professionals, an audience survey and one in-depth interview with an audience member.
    • Orpheus Suite

      Wilson, Colin; University of Derby (2014-09)
      Exhibition of black & white, archival, hand-printed, mural, analogue photographs, comprising three bodies of work; ‘Silent Compositions’, ‘Minor Consolations’ and ‘Morpheus’.
    • The Orrery/The Orrery: between image and object

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (2012)
    • Otherlings

      Bartram, Angela; McCloskey, Paula; Baker, Steve; Davies, Huw; Basi, Ranjit, Philip; Fisher, Craig; Vardy, Sam; Rushton, Stephanie; Mallinson, Mally; Parker, Christine; et al. (University of Derby, 18/10/2019)
      Otherlings is an exhibition featuring work from Ang Bartram, Steve Baker, Huw Davies and Philip Ranjit Basi, Craig Fisher, Paula McCloskey and Sam Vardy, Stephanie Rushton and Mally Mallinson, and Christine Parker. The overarching theme of the artworks within the exhibition suggests something beyond the parameters of dominancy and its cultural representation. The work in many ways offers explicit or implicit ways to connect us to other perspectives, and experiences through different and often unseen and discussed encounters. It thus opens up new paradigms for debate, for how we might live with care and compassion and function with others, as part of a world shared by many.
    • Our teachers: Collected memories of primary education in Derbyshire schools from 1944 - 2009

      Shelton, Fiona; University of Derby (InScience Press, 2019-05-01)
      This paper presents findings from narrative interviews undertaken with 24 narrators who attended primary school in the decades from 1944 - 2009. Deductive themes were first selected by examining the quantity of content and relevance to the study. Four deductive themes were drawn from the narrators’ recollections: Our Teachers; The Lessons We Learned; Our Friendships and the Games We Played and finally The Books we Read. The focus of this paper is on the findings from one of the deductive themes: Our Teachers. Once the stories had been transcribed, they were analysed for inductive themes. These were identified as: Pupil-teacher relationship, noted across each of the decades. A gendered workforce, reflected in each decade, except 1999-2009. Teacher personality was common across all decades. Corporal punishment was common in the decades from 1944-1987, but not present after 1987. Finally, Teacher professionalism was a prevalent theme in most decades except 1999-2009. Key findings related to the connections that come with the relationship the teacher forms with their pupils. Teachers who break the mould are well remembered by pupils. The nature of the primary school workforce has changed since 1944, and is now perceived as being female dominated. Because of changes to legislation, the role of the teacher has evolved, the changes in professional behaviour are noted in the narrators’ stories, from decade to decade.
    • Overview of childhood (Mexico).

      Delgado-Fuentes, Marco Antonio; University of Derby (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2019)
    • Overview of early childhood education (Mexico)

      Delgado-Fuentes, Marco; University of Derby (Bloomsbury Publishing, 2020-10-26)
      This article is part of the Bloomsbury Education and Childhood Studies online resource. It discusses the current educational system in the country for children under six, in the levels of Initial Education and Preschool Education. It includes issues on age range, the role of government in ECE, key providers, programs and services, staff and current challenges.
    • PaintingDigitalPhotography: Synthesis and difference in the age of media equivalence

      Hilliard, John; Honlold, Astrid; Robinson, Carl; Rosenstein, Tatiana; Rushton, Stephanie; Simson, Henrietta; Speidel, Klaus; Walker, Jame Faure; Weir, Catherine M; Wooldridge, Duncan; et al. (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 01/09/2018)
      We live in a digital age where the mediums of art are inextricably bound to the binary code, and painting and photography are redefined in their interconnected relationship through digital reconfiguration. As digitisation unmoors these mediums from their traditional supports, their modes of production, display and dissemination shift. These changes bring about new ways of creating, and engaging with, artworks. Through this, the innate qualities of the mediums, previously anchored in their analogue nature, are re-evaluated through their connection with “the digital”. Born out of the PaintingDigitalPhotography conference, held at QUAD Derby, UK, in May 2017, this anthology of essays investigates aspects of interconnectivity between painting, digital and photography in contemporary art practices. It contributes to critical discourses around networks of associations by examining where syntheses occur, and differences remain, between these mediums at the beginning of the twenty first century.
    • Palgrave advances in John Clare studies

      Kovesi, Simon; Lafford, Erin; Oxford Brookes University; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020-09-18)
      Contributes to ongoing conversations about John Clare's work while offering new perspectives and directions on Clare scholarship, in an accessible writing style Serves as both a useful introduction to Clare and his work for students that are new to it, and a rich resource for scholars already working in the area Essays look at interdisciplinary topics including ecocriticism, environmental humanities, medical humanities, and posthumanism Features essays from established and early career scholars Is comprehensive in its coverage of popular and new topics in Clare studies.
    • Part-time higher education in English colleges: Adult identities in diminishing spaces

      Esmond, Bill; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2016-01-21)
      Adult participation in higher education has frequently entailed mature students studying part time in lower-ranked institutions. In England, higher education policies have increasingly emphasised higher education provision in vocational further education colleges, settings which have extensive adult traditions but which mainly teach employment-based skills and are widely regarded as ‘outside’ higher education. This paper interrogates the significance of these dimensions of college higher education, through a qualitative study of identity formation by adult part-time students. Their accounts, developed through individual interviews and focus groups, emphasised the significance of work to their interpretations of higher education participation: these are compared here to a range of conceptualisations of identity that have been applied in relation to work organisations. This analysis indicates some of the ways in which pathways which adults may interpret as meaningful in terms of work-related identities may correspondingly be constrained by a narrow discourse of work-based skills and credentials.
    • Participatory arts: Mothers make art to heal minor mental health trauma.

      Watts, Lisa; University of Derby (Mental Health Network, 03/11/2017)
      The course was for twelve weeks, three hours a week, and we had a crèche for the Mothers’ children. The group of women were recruited from playgroups and attended the course wishing to question their experience of birth, parenting and fertility through art. The group was not a co-facilitation group as such, but instead over the duration of the course they brought their skills and knowledge to their individual art practice. Whilst I facilitated the group I was simultaneously in another themed group therapy, as a participant, with an art therapist for women that had experienced minor trauma in the birth or early months of their child.