• NAHT Aspire Pilot Evaluation (Executive Summary)

      Neary, Siobhan; Dodd, Vanessa; Radford, Neil; Institute of Education (2016-01)
      The NAHT Aspire Partner Schools programme is based on a multi-strand approach to school improvement. It utilises a five strand design focusing on, leadership, assessment for learning, learning environment, pedagogy and curriculum, and student and family support. This is delivered within clusters groups, underpinned by distributed leadership and supported by external advisers. The model is aligned with current international research on school improvement and effectiveness. It aims to support schools to progress from a Requires Improvement Ofsted assessment to a Good grading within three years. This evaluation reports on the implementation and the impact of NAHT Aspire at just over the two-year point in the programme (six of the nine term cycles of activity). Participants believe that it has improved their school, has empowered teaching staff and built leadership capacity. In addition, it is cost effective and has provided value for money when compared with the costs of forced academisation.
    • The narrative nightclub.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (2018-05-04)
      This chapter brings together expertise in film and cultural studies to analyse representations of nightclub dancefloors in British films from the 1990s onwards: Human Traffic (Justin Kerrigan, 1999), Sorted (Alexander Jovy, 2000), Soul Boy (Shimmy Marcus, 2010), Everywhere and Nowhere (Menhaj Huda, 2011) and Northern Soul (Elaine Constantine, 2014). We use these films to identify persistent visual iconographies and accompanying ideological underpinnings within the British dancefloor film. To understand what these lms do not do, we also look by way of contrast to a film from France, Eden (Mia Hansen-Løve, 2014). Our approach links academic writing on dance music and nightclub cultures with analysis of filmic texts, and in doing so the chapter captures a sense of the wider discourse surrounding nightclubs and especially the dancefloors that often form their focus, on- and off-screen.
    • ‘The natural foundation of perfect efficiency’: Medical services and the Victorian post office

      McIlvenna, Kathleen; Brown, Douglas; Green, David R; Kingston University (Oxford University Press, 2019-01-23)
      This article explores the creation of the Post Office medical service. Working for the Post Office was relatively well-paid and an increasing number of doctors were employed. Medical provision expanded with the introduction of non-contributory pensions from mid-century and developed into a comprehensive and nationwide service that was involved at all stages of employment, from initial recruitment through to receiving a pension. Post Office doctors assessed candidates’ fitness for work, checked on sick absences, provided free medicine and advice and visited workers’ homes. Doctors were responsible for determining whether or not a worker should be pensioned off on grounds of ill health. The career of the first Chief Medical Officer, Dr Waller Lewis, also illustrates the range of other areas in which the Post Office medical service became involved, including the clinical assessment and relief of sickness as well as identifying preventative measures to improve health outcomes.
    • Nature Connections

      Jinks, Cameron; University of Derby (2015-09)
      The highlands are now relatively empty with only about 20% of Scotland’s population living in the region, looking at the bleakness of the landscape it is easy to imagine that this was always the case. However, some of the sites I photograph, Aoneadh Mor for example, were forcibly cleared of their tenant farmers in the nineteenth century to make way for more profitable sheep. The result of these, often brutal, ‘clearances’ was a reduction in the population from about 50% of Scotland’s total to 20%. Mary Cameron's eyewitness account of Aoneadh Mor's forced evictions reached a rapt British readership via the magazine "Good Words", and had an enormous impact on developing unease at what had been done in the name of progress. "The hissing of the fire on the flag of the hearth as they were drowning it reach my heart", she said, "The aged woman, the mother of my husband was then alive, weak and lame. James carried her on his back, in a creel." On the ridge of Sithean na Raiplach, refugees destined for Glasgow and the colonies turned for a last look. "The houses were already stripped. The bleat of the big sheep was on the mountain." Aoneadh Mor, the village of the Cameron highlanders, was cleared to make way for sheep.
    • New Media and the Arab Spring of 2011

      Hudson, Robert Charles; Oboh, Godwin Ehiarekhian; University of Derby (Delmas Communications Ltd, 2012-09-07)
    • New model writer

      Callow, Christos Jr; McFarlane, Anna; Birkbeck, University of London; University of Glasgow (Gylphi, 2016)
      Each chapter in this collection explores the challenge posed to science fiction, literary fiction and contemporary ideas through Roberts’s novels. His use of the science fiction toolkit combined with his sharp and sometimes lyrical prose blurs the distinction that some would wish to maintain between science fiction and mainstream literature.
    • New strategy to transform the quality of careers education, advice and guidance for young people

      Andrews, David; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2016)
      This paper, based on David's experience of having been directly involved in careers work for young people over 35 years, offers some personal suggestions about what should be included in the forthcoming strategy for careers education and guidance. The aim of this strategy should be to ensure that the careers support that young people experience provides them with the help that they need to progress successfully through learning and into work. It should prepare them for lives and careers where they will have to navigate a complex and challenging landscape of education, training and employment.
    • Night after night: costume and performance amongst Sheffield Students.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Sheffield (2008)
      A film about students in Sheffield. Shown at the 9th SIEF Congress, University of Ulster.
    • Night Circus

      McNaney, Nicki; University of Derby (Oriel Davies Gallery, 2016-10)
      “Night Circus” (Screen-printed Artists Book) exhibited in the Imaginary worlds exhibition. Imaginary Worlds was an exhibition of artworks by 52 illustration and book artists from Wales, other parts of the UK, Europe and Australia.
    • Night Circus; An artists publication

      McNaney, Nicki; University of Derby (2015-10)
      The Sheffield 5th International Artist’s Book Prize and exhibition showcased over 200 books selected from nearly 400 individual entries coming from 42 different countries. The publication was developed to explore my use of narrative and sequencing using screen-printing and collage. Characters were created initially using the medium of mono-printing and then collaged by hand and created into various colour separations to take forward into screen-print. The objective of the project was to explore the surreal nature of the narrative and create characters, and an environment that depicted this within the restrictions of the traditional print media and book format.
    • The Night Siren 1, The Night Siren 2 & The Night Siren 3

      McNaney, Nicki; University of Derby (Surface Gallery, 2017-01)
      A set of screen-printed postcards, The International Postcard Show, Surface Gallery, Nottingham.
    • Nineteenth-Century letters as a resource: Midlands women as a case study.

      Flint, Alison Claire; University of Derby (Centre for West Midlands History, 2017-11)
      This paper argues that a letter’s physicality is as important to the twenty-first century social historian as the written word. It is not enough to interpret the letter as a literary document nor is it intelligible to take the letter simply as an historical artefact for both lines of enquiry will result in the recounting of one half of the complete whole. A critical evaluation of the archival collection of the Ogston Estate in the heart of the Midlands, indicated that this group of records can deliver more than a concise male orientated genealogical record or history of a Midlands country estate. It has shown that, and most importantly to this study, the majority of the surviving familiar letters from one Midlands family, were written by women, principally the wives, mothers and daughters of the Turbutt/Gladwin family. This offers a unique insight into the personal preoccupations of gentry women in the Midlands, their economic roles and social lives not only from a gentry family focus but also as a vehicle from which to investigate the extent to which the letter and letter writing in the Midlands in the 1800s played a key role in feminine polite society.
    • No picnic: Explorations in art and research.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Sheffield (NATCECT, 2014-10)
      An output from the interdisciplinary research project into artistic practice and academic research. A supplement detailing responses to the book was printed.
    • Noise and dissonance.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; Kilby, Nick; University of Sheffield (Article and PlastiCities, 2013)
      An audio tape documenting a ritual séance for a Throbbing Gristle performance held at the Now Society, University of Sheffield Students' Union. The séance was directed by the artist Nick Kilby. The tape was published with an essay.
    • Norfolk pauper inventories, c.1690-1834

      Harley, Joseph; University of Derby (Oxford University Press/British Academy, 2020-02-27)
      Pauper inventories were made by poor law officials to record the possessions that people on poor relief owned. These inventories have been known to exist for decades, yet they are notoriously difficult to find and have been under-utilised by generations of historians. For the first time, this book contains transcriptions of 230 pauper inventories from Norfolk. The sources are fully contextualised and indexed, alongside four comprehensive chapters which outline the source's importance and usefulness to readers. Pauper inventories are powerful documents which reveal new insights into the living conditions of the destitute and show that being poor did not necessarily equate to owning very little. The sources will be of use to economic, social and cultural historians who study a wide range of topics including consumption, material culture, production, everyday life, poverty and welfare.
    • Not a decorator.

      Watts, Lisa; University of Derby (Various venues, 2017)
      Not a Decorator researches curatorial models for performance art in the white cube gallery space for the regular day-time viewers. Not a Decorator is three exhibitions and is the second stage of two stages in this research. In this second stage I collaborated with the curators on how best to show my performances and videos and the resulting exhibition was the result of the dialogue. An 'outside eye/ researcher' was employed, Joanne Lee, who is a Senior Lecturer at Sheffield Hallam University in Graphic design. She interviewed the curators, artists and myself throughout the three exhibitions. There will be a symposium held later in 2018 titled, Blink that will discuss the findings.
    • Not sucking in the seventies: The Rolling Stones and the myth of decline

      Philo, Simon; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2015-10-29)
      This article reappraises the Stones’ “lost years.” However, in covering their reputation-imperiling half-decade between 1973 and 1978, it reaches back to the band’s fabled 1960s heyday and forward to its “revival” in order to identify continuities in practice and performance to counter the critical orthodoxy. Through the ’70s, the Rolling Stones released eight studio albums and one live set and toured almost annually; and, while their growing number of critics were keen to charge them with treason, their growing number of fans were evidently untroubled by the band’s often-cited crimes against the “ideology of rock.” I am not simply proposing, though, that healthy sales should be mobilized to bust the myth of decline. For, if not always “ahead of the game,” the Stones had a creatively meaningful relationship with some of the decade’s key musical developments—glam, disco, punk, and reggae. So, far from standing still artistically, gazing glassily at their elegantly wasted navels, stupefied by narcotics and cocooned by their bank balances, the Rolling Stones did some of their best work in this period—from the glam-ballad “Angie” through the funky dread of “Finger Print File” to the lo-fi energy of “Respectable.”
    • Nothing but the Truth, take two: fighting for the reader in the Tlatelolco 1968 discourse

      Carpenter, Victoria; University of Derby (2012-04)
      The hypothesis put forward in this project is that there are two mechanisms of creating a collective memory of the event: one is hegemonic (dominated by state discourses and, potentially, academic studies of the shooting), and the other is posthegemonic (dominated by literary and popular discourses). We also posit that neither mechanism produces or even aims to produce an accurate representation of the event; instead, the two systems control cognitive and affective domains in collective conscience. The present paper will compare the way the two mechanisms are used in the contemporary analyses of the Tlatelolco massacre. The two works in question are Roberto Blanco Moheno, Tlatelolco: historia de una infamia (1969), and Guillermo Balám, Tlatelolco: Reflexiones de un testigo (1969). I aim to determine whether the two authors, apparently representing the opposing camps in the Tlatelolco discourse, approach the representation of the massacre from two divergent perspectives or whether their texts are characterised by the unity of the mechanisms involved in creating a memory of the event in the collective conscience.
    • Now we don’t see the university as something distant. It’s here in our hands’: situated pedagogy in Cuban municipal universities

      Smith, Rosemary; University of Nottingham (Institute for Education Policy Studies, 04/2019)
      The first years of the twenty-first century saw the introduction of a new mode of higher education in Cuba. Local university centres were set up across the country offering part time study to a range of students previously marginalised from higher education. As well as massively increasing access, this programme created a new kind of teacher – local professionals teaching part-time alongside their regular employment. Using the personal testimony of students and teachers in rural Granma, this paper examines the role of these teachers, with a particular emphasis on the value of their capacity to offer a pedagogy situated in the workplaces, communities and daily lives of their students.