• A cage for the muse and the limits of invention

      Brown, Michael; Wilson, Chris; University of Derby (KIE Conference Publications, 2016)
      This paper explores the notion that creativity in the arts, particularly music, benefits from constraints. Expressive freedom is often fostered within education to encourage the pursuit of artistic individualism, but straying too far from stylistic norms can often engender incoherence. This paper does not challenge the breaking of rules that define a style nor does it denigrate the benefits that may arise from conflicting ideas and unusual combinations, but explores the virtue and benefits of boundaries and suggests that freedom, from a creative perspective, is often an illusory construct; strong creative identities are achievable through and often defined by creative constraints. Conclusions focus on the potential profits of constraints that bind expressive ideas and the function and virtue of intuition within the creative process; theorizing upon whether creative confinement, or the awareness thereof, is ultimately a liberating or inhibiting experience. We determine that artistic creative freedom as a concept may indeed be illusory, but the perception of freedom for some is a necessary ingredient in the creative act.
    • Can’t spell, can’t teach? An exploration of stakeholder attitudes towards those with dyslexia, training to be primary classroom teachers

      Charles, Sarah; University of Derby (2017-05-12)
      Aim: This paper seeks to investigate whether the dominance of a standards drive approach to ITE, and the teaching profession, has perpetuated attitudinal barriers to the recruitment and employment of students with dyslexia. Stakeholder understanding of the term dyslexia; perceived strengths/challenges those with dyslexia bring to the profession; what constitutes as reasonable adjustments and employability prospects, based on disclosure, are explored. Content: The presentation will disseminate and discuss key findings related to ITE stakeholder attitudes towards those with dyslexia, training to be primary teachers on ITE programmes. Findings suggest that there remains uncertainty and confusion about dyslexia, its associated characteristics/causes. Many stakeholders perceive dyslexia negatively, couched in deficits rather than difference. This research found strengths such as empathy, inclusive practice and ease of identification of children with dyslexia are attributed to those training to teach with dyslexia. Stakeholder concerns, of those entering the profession, with dyslexia, are identified as being– ability to cope with the demands of the profession; the inability to teach particular age groups/subjects; the level of support needed to ensure success and retention following qualification. This latter concern constitutes a key finding of this research, as the level of support afforded by universities is perceived as being unrealistic in the workplace. The notion of what constitutes ‘reasonable adjustments’ is questioned by many ITE stakeholders. A number of ‘reasonable adjustments’ are perceived by stakeholders as being unreasonable within the teaching profession due to the professional roles, responsibilities and requirements of being a teaching professional. Furthermore, uncertainty exists as to how schools can actually support those with dyslexia, in light of professional standards. A significant majority of stakeholders demonstrated a negative attitude towards the notion of people with dyslexia entering the teaching profession, believing that parents should be concerned if their child is being taught by someone with dyslexia. Both of these findings could have serious implications on the future disclosure of those with dyslexia. This research has found that a fear of stigmatisation and potential discrimination, which deter those with dyslexia from disclosing on course and job applications are justified and real. This research concludes that employability chances are lessened upon disclosure of dyslexia. This presentation will seek to engage the audience to consider their own understanding of dyslexia; their institutional policies regarding disclosure, support and training in light of equality legislation and, ultimately, their own attitudes towards the suitability of those with dyslexia studying on, ITE programmes. Thinking deeply about teacher education: This is a thought provoking presentation which encourages the audience to think carefully about those with dyslexia on ITE programmes, and the potential professional, legal, ethical and moral tensions due to concerns that; “The drive for high literacy standards will be compromised if teachers with ‘weaker’ literacy standards are employed” (Riddick, 2003, p.390). The country/ies to which the presentation relates: This presentation has scope and relevance to all countries where there is incidence of dyslexia and where students are required to meet professional standards to enter the teaching profession.
    • Care + attend.

      Watts, Lisa; University of Derby (Society of Artistic Research, 2015-02)
      Care + Attend comprises a constellation of fragments and extracts - of different intensities and durations - where the exposition of research emerges as poetic and performative, generating moments of potential resonance and dialogue. We explore the theme Unconditional Love through the principles (perhaps even methodologies) of care and attention, as applied within specific (artistic) practices of both the everyday and of the self. Beginning with the observation that both curate and curiosity have shared etymology in the term ‘care’, Care + Attend seeks to develop a research vocabulary based on receptivity, openness, fidelity, integrity, intimacy, friendship and commitment (whilst not ignoring the parallel principles of distraction, inattention, the act of closing one’s eyes or of looking away). Cocker and Lee have invited a range of artists & writers to share and reflect on their own processes, philosophies and politics of care and attention, and to present these through live performance, screenings and spoken word. Contributors include Kate Briggs, Daniela Cascella, Belén Cerezo, Emma Cocker, Steve Dutton + Neil Webb, Victoria Gray, Rob Flint, Mark Leahy, Joanne Lee, Martin Lewis, Sarat Maharaj, Brigid McLeer, Hester Reeve, and Lisa Watts [Society for Artistic Research website].
    • Care of the person with dementia : interprofessional practice and education

      Forman, Dawn; Pond, Dimity; University of Derby; Newcastle University Australia (Cambridge University Press, 2015-11)
      Care of the Person with Dementia responds to the urgent need for health practitioners to take an innovative approach to the challenge of dementia. The first Australian text of its kind, it combines evidence-based resources with interprofessional education and practice, exploring the ethical, social and environmental repercussions of dementia to provide a comprehensive overview of dementia care in an Australian context. The text is structured around a model of interprofessional education and practice (IPE) tailored to dementia care. This model incorporates the context of care, an important element missing from other recognised models of IPE. Throughout the book, principles of IPE are explained within the context of dementia, drawing on exemplars from a body of current, well-researched and evaluated dementia practice. Written by experienced academics, and providing national and international perspectives, this is a unique and crucial resource to develop collaborative skills and professional knowledge in the management of dementia.
    • Career development training, certification, supervision and professionalization: case examples from four countries.

      Neault, Roberta; Artess, Jane; Tien, Hsiu-Lan Shelley; Hopkins, Sareena; Arulmani, Gideon; University of Derby (Indian Association of Career and Livelihood Planning (IACLP), 2016-12)
      The career development sector is professionalizing internationally, through training, certifications, and an abundance of opportunities to learn from colleagues at conferences and international symposia. However, there are significant differences in how the profession is developing in different parts of the world; the notion of “career” is recognized as culturebound and, perhaps, inconceivable to many individuals. In this paper, career development educators from four countries in Asia, North America, and Europe share case examples of the career development sector’s evolution in their regions. Together, they represent institutions and training programs from the public and private sectors, in both formal and informal settings. Several of the authors have been influential in introducing and customizing career development practitioner competency frameworks and training for practitioners from diverse backgrounds to meet certification requirements. Together they examine how professionalizing the delivery of career development services has emerged in their regions, the variety of training opportunities available along a continuum from preparation for practice to reflection of practice, the diversity of standards and certifications in the career development sector, and the early stages of addressing the need for training and equipping supervisors and leaders. The authors advocate a “both/and” approach to professionalization, grounded in local research that surfaces felt needs and then customizing training, resources, and standards that incorporate relevant elements from international sources
    • Career guidance for social justice

      Hooley, Tristram; Sultana, Ronald G.; University of Derby (National Institute for Career Education and Counselling (NICEC) and CDI, 2016-04)
      This editorial sets the context for issue 36 of the NICEC journal which is focused on social justice and career guidance. The editorial explores the key themes of the issue highlighting the social justice tradition within the career guidance field and making the case for a strong focus on social justice. However the editorial also highlights the tensions that exist between career guidance’s orientation to the individual and understandings of social justice which are more socially orientated. The editorial concludes by arguing that if career guidance is to formulate a meaningful response to social injustice it needs to draw on diverse theoretical traditions and stimulate new forms of practice.
    • Career guidance in communities

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2014)
      Career guidance in communities, by Rie Thomsen, Aarhus, Denmark, Aarhus University Press, 2012, 256 pp., £34.78 (paperback), ISBN 9788771240122 Reviewed by Tristram Hooley, Reader in Career Development, University of Derby, UK. Email: T.Hooley@derby.ac.uk
    • Careers coaching for social justice: the case of school leadership and inclusive education for children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities

      Robinson, Deborah; Codina, Geraldene; Jill, Hanson; Eleni, Dimitrellou; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2020-12-18)
      This paper focusses on emancipatory careers coaching for social justice and proposes a practical tool for use with school leaders who are working to improve the inclusiveness of their schools. It draws on a study of 75 school leaders working on a programme of peer review in a city in England. The programme was named the Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND) Peer Challenge Programme and through it, participants worked collaboratively to evaluate and improve the quality of inclusive practice in the City’s mainstream (ordinary) schools. The study used inductive qualitative content analysis (QCA) to form a coding agenda which was then applied to a deductive analysis of 24 SEND Peer Challenge school reports. These reports were collaboratively produced by leaders engaged in the SEND Peer Challenge Programme to summarise the outcomes of the process. Following final QCA reduction, the research identified six value constructs that were live and relevant for school leaders in the City related to collectivism, collaboration and mutuality. These value constructs are also live in the field of inclusive education more widely. Drawing on the six value constructs, we propose practical strategies for emancipatory careers coaching. These strategies can be applied by individuals who provide careers coaching for school leaders engaged in the process of school improvement for SEND and inclusion.
    • Causal contexts, cognitive cartoons and spatial sound

      Lennox, Peter; Myatt, Tony; University of Derby (Qu e e n M a r y , U n i v e r s i t y o f L o n d o n, 20/12/2006)
      Based on previous work the proposal here is that spatial perception problems in artificial environments (e.g. spatial music displays) can be cast as a subset of the problems of cognitive mapping of the causal context that surrounds and supports the perceiver. The intuitively available distinctions in these contexts of foreground and background, previously couched in terms of perceptual significance exist as externally valid causal distinctions; the task of perception is to cognitively represent these distinctions sufficiently for appropriate interaction. Effectively, this means that some items will “naturally” occupy attention, whilst others should equally naturally appeal to background, inattentive processes. Hence, aspects of the causal context will be accorded differing cognitive resources according to their significance, and some may be very sparsely represented in cartoon form. That is, perception engages in sophisticated information reduction in cognitive representation in order to capitalise on available resources. This poster outlines how causal contexts (including spatial matters) can be physically cartoonified in reciprocal manner to the dedicated perceptual mechanisms’ operations, to economically and intuitively appeal to perception.
    • Ceramic sculpture of animals and birds

      James, Jeremy; University of Derby (2016)
      This show will feature a major new body of work by Jeremy James. Included for the first time are his linocuts of wildlife alongside his much loved ceramic sculpture. His subject matter ranges from all kinds of birds to animals such as hares, otters and meerkats. Jeremy divides his time between teaching and continuing to make and show work with many galleries nationally and internationally.
    • Challenges to implementing a new technology in Teacher Education. Phase One: ‘meaningful’ digital reflections.

      Byrd, Jo; University of Derby (University of Cumbria, 2017)
      This paper describes the challenges of introducing a digital tool to trainee teachers. A group of nineteen undergraduate students studying primary education and in their third year of a four year course was introduced to PebblePad5. PebblePad is an online tool which is not new in the world of ITE. However, the latest version has more useful features and is less ‘clunky’ than older versions. The students each had their own private account where eventually they would be expected to store all of their placement files, add multi-modal content and then choose to share some or all of this content publically or by personal invitation via email. One of the benefits for us as an ITE provider is that we can view our students’ files electronically and comment on them without necessarily making the one/two hour round trip to the placement school. Although students used some technology, this research shows that students need more training in using technology competently in the workplace setting. Phase One of the project was to encourage the students to write their reflections on placement digitally. It was hoped that the students would be enthusiastic about using PebblePad and I would see an improvement in the levels of engagement with the reflective process and thus, the quality of teaching and learning as a result of this. Data obtained from questionnaires and a focus group indicate that PebblePad was viewed as a useful tool, but training issues and time constraints of the project meant it was not as successful for this cohort as was hoped. This paper discusses the issues that arose and the plan to overcome these barriers in the next phase of the implementation of PebblePad.
    • Chancel frequencies.

      Locke, Caroline; University of Derby (20-21 Arts Centre, 2015)
      Chancel Frequencies at 20-21 Arts Centre featured three works especially selected to respond to the former church building as a contemplative space, portraying images of sound, which are otherworldly, and designed to encourage contemplation. Circular projections show vibrations caused by different sound waves through water, filmed as part of her previous Sound Fountains project. In a new site specific work, three shallow steel pools made in the shape of the church window contain motors causing gentle ripples that will be reflected on the surrounding walls. Finally on a wall mounted screen, a film loop shows a single tuning fork shifting between 25Hz and 16Hz – made in connection with Frequency of Trees.This was a commissioned Exhibition at 20-21, from July 9th – October 9th 2015.
    • Changing employer practices in graduate recruitment: implications for career development

      Hirsh, Wendy; Pollard, Emma; Artess, Jane; HECSU (National Institute for Career Education and Counselling (NICEC), 2015-10)
      A major study of the changing graduate recruitment practices of UK employers, was conducted during 2014 by the Institute for Employment Studies (IES) and the Higher Education Careers Services Unit (HECSU) for the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS). It involved in-depth interviews with 76 employers (diverse by size and sector) and 30 'stakeholders' in graduate employment, including university careers services. The qualitative data were complemented by analysis of existing quantitative data on graduate employment and a wide ranging literature review. This article reports on selected findings relevant to career development professionals, including: the challenges for employers of attracting appropriate applicants; employers' generic skill needs and views on employability; the changing reasons and criteria for targeting specific higher education (HE) institutions; and employers' increasingly strategic use of work experience in graduate recruitment.
    • Changing geographies and tourist scholarship.

      Crouch, David; University of Derby; Humanities, University of Derby, Derby, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (Taylor and Francis, 2017-12)
    • Clare's mutterings, murmurings, and ramblings: the sounds of health

      Lafford, Erin; University of Oxford (The John Clare Society, 2014-07)
      Clare is valued as a poet of direct communication. His poems are filled with Northamptonshire dialect that fosters an instantaneous connection to his local environment, creating an immediate sense of place though sound. Likewise, Clare’s representations of natural sounds, such as the ‘whewing’ of the pewit, the ‘swop’ of the jay bird as it flies, and the ‘chickering crickets’, have a mimetic quality that creates a direct experience of what he hears.1 Seamus Heaney grouped Clare with what he called ‘monoglot geniuses’, meaning that he had a gift for conveying through poetry a ‘univocal homeplace’ that his readers could understand without necessarily belonging to that place themselves.2 However, this idea of Clare as a poet of such direct coherency is complicated by his madness or, specifically, by his repeated usage of a vocalisation which carries connotations of madness. This essay will consider the ways that Clare represents health and madness at the level of sound, by bringing them into relationship with a mode of speaking that recurs throughout his poetry and prose: his use of muttering. It will suggest that Clare’s poetic investment in muttering and the sub-vocal register as both a personalised, therapeutic mode of self-address, and a way to foster a deep poetic relationship with his natural surroundings, comes to complicate his formal representation of health as a clear ‘strong voice’.
    • Clever Jack and the giants.

      Davidson, Susanna; Broadley, Leo; University of Derby (Usborne Publishing, 01/01/2015)
      A classic tale, retold for young readers. When poor Jack swots seven flies with a single blow, he can't wait to tell the world how brave he is. But he has to use his wits to defeat an angry collection of giants to become a real hero.
    • Co-curation as feminist practice: exhibiting the work of Marion Adnams

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2021-06-04)
      This article explores the co-curation of the ‘Marion Adnams: A Singular Woman’ exhibition at Derby Museum and Art Gallery (December 2017 to March 2018). The process of co-curation is a productive and challenging way to engage with an artist’s work. The discussion adopts a feminist perspective to consider the act of curation and the considerations involved in organising and engaging with an artist’s life and work. The place of an artist within narratives of art history can be problematic and challenging and the process of drawing together a body of work for exhibition raises as many questions as it answers. However, this discussion considers the extent to which this is a constructive and significant activity and the ways in which co-curation can contribute to reincorporating artists such as Marion Adnams into art history and recuperating her work and its contribution to British art history and beyond. The approach to feminist co-curation includes a consideration of how to present a female artist’s work and the issues involved in curating an exhibition as a representation of their practice.
    • Cognitive development

      Johnston, Jane; Oates, Ruby; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-02-16)
    • Cognitive maps and spatial sound

      Lennox, Peter; University of Derby (2013-09)
      This presentation, accompanying a conference paper at the Audio Engineering Society's 52nd Annual Conference, is used as undergraduate teaching material at the University of Derby.The Paper paper discusses the applicability of the “cognitive map” metaphor to potential usages of artificial auditory environments. The theoretical contents of such maps are suggested. Maps are generally considered as having spatial, temporal, causal and territorial representational character, so that affordances in the environment can be utilized in timely fashion. A goal of this theorizing is that artificial auditory environments could appropriately represent affordances for interaction in entertainment, simulation and auditory cognitive training.
    • Collaborating animals: Dog and human artists.

      Bartram, Angela; University of Lincoln (University of Adelaide, 2017)
      Be Your Dog was a Live Art Development Agency DIY funded project that aimed to explore and analyse relationships beyond the hierarchies of pet and owner in response to Donna Haraway’s concept of two companions are necessary for a functional co-species cohabition. This is in response to scientific findings in animal behavioural studies that suggests hierarchy is unproductive in interspecies domestic cohabitation, and that non-human animals respond to other beings through emotional contagion and empathy. Palagi, Nicotra and Cordoni state in Rapid Mimicry and Emotional Contagion in Domestic Dogs “emotional contagion, a basic building block of empathy, occurs when a subject shares the same affective state of another,” which the project tests and explores with selected artists and their dogs. The project sees participants and their dogs attend workshops over two consecutive weekends to learn how to establish empathy, equality and connection. This included learning strategies for dog and human to be equals with each other, and with other pairs to test if it is possible to establish a non-hierarchical pack. Essentially, the project tests scientific findings through art practice, and concludes that it is possible to learn about, and relate to the cohabiting animals when empathy and equality is engaged instead of dominance. A concluding public event was staged at KARST (Plymouth) following the workshops on 6 November 2016 where all participants, human and dog, performed as collaborators. Analysis of Be Your Dog was presented as a video paper, ‘Collaborating Animals: Dog and Human Artists’ presented at Animal Intersections, at the 7th AASA Conference at University of Adelaide, 3-5 July 2017. Reworked video footage from the public event included in the conference’s accompanying exhibition at Peanut Gallery and Nexus Arts, Adelaide, 4-16 July 2017. Additionally, he paper, ‘Collaborative Animals: Dogs and Humans as Co-Working Artists, was presented at the conference ‘Living With Animals/Seeing with Animals, 22-26 March 2017 at Eastern Kentucky University.