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      Lane, Kit; University of Derby (2014-05)
      A variety of source material was used including original photographic and video images, computer generated imagery and Creative Commons licensed images. A lack of suitable rigging positions for projectors was overcome by utilising a single projector and a projection mapping system in place of three projectors.
    • 3-D Sound: Massive and minute

      Lennox, Peter; University of Derby (2006-06)
      A Technical, perceptual and aesthetic exploration of cellular "multi-scale" artificial auditory environments
    • 32 significant moments: An artist's practice as research.

      Watts, Lisa; University of Derby ([Self-published], 01/03/2014)
      The booklet is 23,000 words and is structured with an introduction and the SASs are shown as charts on several pages. Then the main body of the book is in thirty two sections. Each section starts at on a fresh page and can involve a quote from the studio, photographs, text that explains the moment and on twelve occasions an in-depth essay into the moment captured. The book is written in a creative fun manner.
    • 3D audio as an information-environment: manipulating perceptual significance for differntiation and pre-selection

      Lennox, Peter; Vaughan, John; Myatt, Tony; University of York (Laboratory of Acoustics and audio signal processing and the Telecommunications Software and Multimedia Laboratory, Helsinki University of Technology, 29/08/2001)
      Contemporary use of sound as artificial information display is rudimentary, with little 'depth of significance' to facilitate users' selective attention. We believe that this is due to conceptual neglect of 'context' or perceptual background information. This paper describes a systematic approach to developing 3D audio information environments that utilise known cognitive characteristics, in order to promote rapidity and ease of use. The key concepts are perceptual space, perceptual significance, ambience labelling information and cartoonification.
    • 3D EDM (Electronic Dance Music)

      Vandemast-Bell, Paul; University of Derby (2016)
      This presentation discusses my work with Sonic Emotion’s Wave Field Synthesis system - Wave 1. I have spacialized a pre-recorded EDM performance (consisting of 4 stereo tracks) to investigate how my stereo work translates to 3D and the potential uses of 3D sound within a club environment.
    • Academic freedom means free speech and no "buts"

      Hayes, Dennis; Academics For Academic Freedom (The Free Society, 2008)
      In this short paper Dennis Hayes argues that academics have a responsibility to challenge conventional wisdom.
    • Access to early childhood education (Mexico).

      Martínez Valle, Claudia Osiris; Universidad Iberoamericana (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2019-01-02)
    • Acquisition, development and maintenance of maths anxiety in young children

      Petronzi, Dominic; Staples, Paul; Sheffield, David; Hunt, Thomas; University of Derby (Routledge, 2019-02-18)
    • Acting alone

      Hunt, Ava; Branson, Tilly; Scott, Ivan; University of Derby (2016)
      Acting Alone is a practice-as-research solo performance (ACE funded; Amnesty International Derbyshire commission) which toured nationally/ internationally during (2014-2016). An autobiographical provocation inspired by the Israeli/Palestinian conflict based on Hunt’s experience of witnessing Playback theatre in the West Bank. The performance presented this human rights conflict to international audiences asking - can one person make a difference? Historical characters, who acted heroically, against the unheroic acts of Hunt in Palestine where woven throughout. This immersive piece created a strong performer/audience relationship which created powerful moments, during the performance, of audience participation e.g. joining in, helping, with small tasks contributing to the storytelling, leading to the final transformative moment when the audience would be invited to complete the show by crossing the dramaturgical divide. Acting Alone performed to multi-faith communities, studio theatres, non-theatre venues, schools, and at the Just Festival Edinburgh Fringe (receiving 5 star reviews) . The artistic and creative design of Acting Alone was inspired by Boal’s Forum Theatre, where audiences, as Spect-actors, are invited to rehearse a revolutionary act challenging their oppression, however, Acting Alone explored the role of the by-stander or the tritagonist. The tritagonist position is neither protagonist nor antagonist but opens up the third role exploring the agency of the international community. Performances and papers were presented and performed at academic conferences in UK, Ireland, New Zealand, USA and Sweden where Dr Rand (Massey University New Zealand) presented a paper to the IFTR conference inspired by the production entitled: Re-Enacting Palestine and the Performance of Credibility. Detailed responses from audiences (over one thousand) demonstrated discourse, political activism as well as controversial commentary including accusations of falsification and anti-Semitism. Enquiry into the by-stander or tritagonist role through audience/performer immersion, highlighted this new area of knowledge and practice which will be developed in Hunt’s forthcoming PhD.
    • Acting alone

      Hunt, Ava; Branson, Tilly; University of Derby (2016)
      Acting Alone was written and performed by Ava Hunt with dramaturgy and direction by Tilly Branson. This creative and artistic research used autobiographical solo performance explored social/political engagement through the creation and structure of the performer/audience relationship. The piece used autobiographical, verbatim and documentary theatre approaches demonstrating the complexities of being an artist making applied theatre. The piece enquired into the risks of taking direct action or experiencing the fear and humiliation of inaction. Retelling Hunt’s experience in a refugee camp watching a piece of Playback Theatre performed by Palestinian theatre company – The Freedom Theatre, this witnessed event was returned to throughout against other intertwining narratives: presenting historical/heroic characters (Irena Sendler and Rachel Corrie) who took direct action, together with verbatim accounts of people that Hunt met in Israel and Palestine e.g. an outspoken UN Lawyer, a young Israeli soldier from Birmingham. The piece also contains four simple folk tales that are told to help to illustrate the historical and political complexities of the Israeli/Palestinian conflict in an accessible form. Primarily, the piece explores human rights issues from a by-stander/international perspective by weaving participation throughout into a performance provocation, a space in which the audience were invited to cross the dramaturgical divide and engage in the Israeli/Palestinian conflict posing the question - can one person make a difference? Originally commissioned by Amnesty International Wirksworth, this applied theatre practice: Acting Alone toured throughout the UK and internationally performing to a thousand people in different communities, countries and contexts including the Edinburgh Fringe Festival as part of the Just Festival at St Johns Church, where it received critical reviews including: Five Stars from TV Bomb 2016: “Acting Alone .. ingeniously goes against audiences’ expectations regarding both the theatre art-form itself and the handling of the overly yet ineffectively debated topic of the sufferings of Palestinians.” Audiences engaged positively in the discourse created by this artistic research although for some the Israeli/Palestinian conflict is highly controversial and accusations of the piece being unbalanced were received, and the authenticity of the material questioned. Branson and Hunt responded to audience feedback where appropriate recognising that autobiographical and verbatim theatre offers alternative narratives offering audiences insight into Palestinian people’s experiences that are not widely reported. However, when critical reviews such as British Theatre Guide 2016 - Keith Mckenna said “….a thoughtful play given an engaging performance by Ava Hunt…..Theatre can help ensure that those suffering injustice are not isolated. The solidarity of those inside Palestine and those beyond make sure that those wanting change are not acting alone.” The tour enabled valuable primary data to be collected to support the research question creating discourse for audiences to enquire into the by-stander role as part of an international community.
    • Acting Alone - Can one person make a difference?

      Hunt, Ava; Tilly Branson; Ivan Stott; University of Derby; Andy Purves (2015-11)
      Acting Alone is artistic research using solo performance, autobiographical, verbatim and documentary theatricals. Exploring the Israeli/Palestinian conflict through interwoven stories, the piece asks questions of the audience: Can one person actually make a difference? In 2014 Amnesty International (Derbyshire) commissioned Ava Hunt to create a provocation in response to the renewed confliction and humanitarian crises in Gaza. In its exploration of the complex situation faced by those living in Palestine, Acting Alone challenged the theatrical conventions most often experienced by audiences. Using immersive and participatory invitations, the piece encouraged the audience to interact and to cross the dramaturgical divide creating an ending where no-one, including the performer, knows the resolution. This artistic research builds on Hunt’s enquiry and work with artists and educators working in the West Bank, where she worked with children at the Aida Refugee Camp with Dr. Abedelfattah Absourer whose belief and commitment in the use of the arts in the community is to inspire ‘the beautiful resistance’. The performance offered a creative response to this ongoing war, oppression and abuse of human rights opening up a discourse of what is our responsibility and what action is possible from an international community perspective – a performative of hope.
    • An action repeated: a conference paper delivered for the Format International Photography Festival Film & Photography Conference 2015

      Shore, Tim; University of Derby (2015-04)
      An action repeated by thousands of hands, thousands of times at the pace established for each shift. (Cities & Signs:5, Invisible Cities, Italio Calvino). The presentation is about my research made in developing a commission (New Expressions, Visual Arts Network) to make an artwork in collaboration with a museum. The work will explore the meaning and experience of the working day for the mill workers of the early textile mills.
    • Adam Roberts: Critical essays

      Callow, Christos Jr; McFarlane, Anna; Birkbeck, University of London; University of Glasgow (Gylphi, 2016-10-04)
      Each chapter in this collection explores the challenge posed to science fiction, literary fiction and contemporary ideas through Roberts’s novels. His use of the science fiction toolkit combined with his sharp and sometimes lyrical prose blurs the distinction that some would wish to maintain between science fiction and mainstream literature.
    • Addressing ill health: Sickness and retirement in the Victorian post office

      Green, David R; Brown, Douglas H L; McIlvenna, Kathleen; University of Derby (Oxford Academic., 2018-11-15)
      This article explores ill health and retirement in the Victorian Post Office. Compared to other branches of the Civil Service, ill health was of greater importance as a cause of retirement. Post Office doctors kept careful records of sickness absence, which rose over the period for all workers. These records were also used to determine if employees should be pensioned off on grounds of ill health. Employees in different sections of the Post Office experienced varying levels of sickness depending on their place of employment and the type of work undertaken. Feminisation of the workforce also affected the prevalence of sickness absences, especially in London. Place of work was an important influence on the pattern of sickness with urban areas having higher levels of sickness than rural districts, with distinct sets of conditions linked to each.
    • Addressing the needs of the other 90% - the role of cycling in developing the sustainable agenda in Johannesburg

      Di Monte-Milner, Giovanna; Breytenbach, Amanda; University of Johannesburg (The Greenside Design Centre, University of Johannesburg (CUMULUS), 2014)
      Cycling is an energy efficient nonpolluting form of transport and is considered as one of the most sustainable means of transport. In South Africa cycling has been poorly recognized and supported by government and citizens as a sustainable mode of transport. However, drastic changes are proposed for the transport systems in the City of Johannesburg (also Joburg) and citizens are showing a growing interest in cycling for both recreation and commuting purposes. This paper investigates the changing cycling culture in Johannesburg and the extent to which cycling is recognized by government and included in the development of a sustainability agenda that addresses the socio-economic needs of Johannesburg citizens. National cycling projects, cycling associations and cycling events such as the monthly Johannesburg Critical Bike Mass Ride events are briefly described and used as reference points to illustrate the growing interest expressed by non-profit organizations and citizens to accommodate cyclists on public roads. This investigation aims to make a contribution to the sustainable design project through reflecting on a drastic proposed change for Johannesburg city transport which will impact on various design disciplines that can provide specialist knowledge in the development of a sustainable transport system. This paper therefore acknowledge the complex dynamic system in which society operates and argue that through paying attention to the needs of citizens, designers can become co-creators within the system
    • After Brexit, snowflake professors need to grow up

      Hayes, Dennis; University of Derby (spiked Ltd., 2016-12-12)
      'Stupid', 'racist' and 'uneducated' – many academics think that these three wordscharacterise the 17.4 million people who voted for Brexit. They are upset by the referendum and universities are so concerned with staff wellbeing that they are offering academics Brexit therapy!
    • After the Holocaust: Facing the Nazi past in British and international perspective—an interview with David Cesarani

      Allwork Larissa; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019-11-25)
      This chapter focuses on Gerhard Richter’s Uncle Rudi (1965) and Mr Heyde (1965) and Gustav Metzger’s Historic Photographs series (1995–1998) in order to present a new interpretation of how these artists perform the photograph in order to provoke cultural rather than legal confrontations with Nazi criminality. Rejecting Holocaust representational pieties in favour of the reinterpretation of the Duchampian ‘Readymade’ in the case of Richter, and Dada’s anti-aesthetics of destruction and revulsion in Metzger’s, this chapter will argue that Richter’s oblique pose of the ‘anti-ideological artist’ and Metzger’s more overt performance of the ‘subversive social activist’ are part of important social and cultural processes of confronting Nazi criminality. These types of cultural reckonings were recognized as important in David Cesarani’s edited collection, After Eichmann: Collective Memory and the Holocaust after 1961 (2005).
    • Afterword: from affect to landscape and back

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (Ashgate Publishing Ltd., 2015)
    • Afterword: Reading mad men in the era of Trump

      Forde, Teresa; McNally, Karen; University of Derby; London Metropolitan University (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019-12-12)
      This edited collection examines the enduringly popular television series as Mad Men still captivates audiences and scholars in its nuanced depiction of a complex decade. This is the first book to offer an analysis of Mad Men in its entirety, exploring the cyclical and episodic structure of the long form series and investigating issues of representation, power and social change. The collection establishes the show’s legacy in televisual terms, and brings it up to date through an examination of its cultural importance in the Trump era. Aimed at scholars and interested general readers, the book illustrates the ways in which Mad Men has become a cultural marker for reflecting upon contemporary television and politics.
    • Agency and rights in childhood (Mexico).

      Martínez, José Francisco; ACUDE (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2019)