• Curious apothecary.

      McNaney, Nicki; University of Derby (14/10/2017)
      A artist book Curious Apothecary is published within in a Artist Book "Prescriptions " as part of a wider research project on artists’ books and the medical humanities, organised by the University of Kent and the University of New England (Maine Women Writers Collection), and supported by the Wellcome Trust. The book explores the role book arts can play in raising awareness of the richness and value of live accounts of illness.
    • Curious Apothecary; An artists publication

      McNaney, Nicki; University of Derby (2016-09)
      “Prescriptions” was a juried exhibition of book art to supplement Martha Hall’s exhibition of works as part of Artists’ Books and the Medical Humanities symposium and workshop. The symposium, which launched Prescriptions, explored connections between artists' books, health/illness and medicine from interdisciplinary perspectives. The publication “Curious Apothecary” invites the viewer to create their own interpretation of the curious nature of the medical practices that took place in the 18th century and challenges the traditional processes of illustration through printmaking, while exploring its application in a more contemporary artists book format.
    • Re-odorization, disease and emotion in mid-nineteenth century England

      Tullett, William; University of Derby (Cambridge University Press, 2018-10-08)
      This article argues that smell’s place in nineteenth-century medicine and public health was distinctly ambiguous. Standard narratives in the history of smell argue that smell became less important in this period whilst also arguing that urban spaces were deodorized. The causal motor for the latter shift is medical theories about odour and miasma. By contrast, this article argues that sanitary practices of circulation, ventilation, and disinfection proceeded despite, not because of, medical attitudes to smell. Surgeons and physicians argued that odours were no indicator of disease causing matter and distrusted the use of smell because of its subjective qualities and resistance to linguistic definition. Yet these qualities made smell all the more powerful in sanitary literature, where it was used to generate a powerful emotional effect on readers. Histories of smell need to attend not just to deodorization but re-odorization; the disjuncture between practices of smelling and their textual or visual representation; and chronologies that track the shelving and re-deploying of ways of sensing in different times, places, and communities rather than tracking the de novo emergence of a modern western sensorium. In mid nineteenth-century England smell retained its power, but that power now came from its rhetorical rather than epistemological force.