• Appeals to semiotic registers in ethno-metapragmatic accounts of variation

      Penry Williams, Cara; La Trobe University (Victoria, Australia); University of Derby (Wiley, 2019-04-29)
      Discussions of folklinguistic accounts of language use are frequently focused on dismissing them because of their limitations. As a result, not a lot is written regarding how such accounts are done and how they ‘work’. This article examines how folklinguistic evaluations are achieved in interaction, particularly through appeals to semiotic registers (Agha 2007). It describes how in explaining their beliefs regarding linguistic variation, speakers frequently produce voicings with varying transparency. These rely on understandings of the social world and bring large collections of linguistic resources into play. They offer rich insights if analytic attention is given to their details because even when evaluating a single variant, whole ways of speaking, and even being, may be utilized. The paper explores in turn how analysis reveals the inseparability of variants, understandings of context and audience, the relationship between linguistic forms and social types, and the performance of social types via the evaluation of semiotic resources. In each section, discussion is grounded in extracts from interviews on Australian English with speakers of this variety of English. Cumulatively they show the primacy of semiotic registers in ethno-metapragmatic accounts.
    • Conflict, identity and the role of the internet: the use of the internet by the Serbian intelligentsia in the 1999 conflict over Kosovo

      Hudson, Robert Charles; University of Derby (Delta State University, 2010-04)
      This article investigates the role of the nature of electronic communications in what has been recognised as being the first Internet war. It builds upon Regis Debray's theory on the three stages of the intellectual (university, print media and television) by advocating that the Internet has become the fourth stage for the intellectual in speaking truth to power (Said).
    • Developing an identity as an EdD leader: A reflexive narrative account.

      Tupling, Claire; Outhwaite, Deborah Emily; University of Derby; University of Warwick (Sage, 2017-11-22)
      This article considers the challenges encountered by a recently appointed assistant programme leader in establishing an identity as a leader of an EdD programme. In discussing literature on the development of the EdD, the article recognizes an existing concern with student identity but highlights a need to consider the development of the EdD leader’s identity as a leader. Employing a reflexive narrative, the article emphasizes the centrality of the leader’s disabled identity in considering the role of assistant programme leader and thus becoming a leader. The EdD is identified as a social space where colleagues are often engaged in their professional learning with the EdD leadership team providing support. This article tracks some of the commonplace behaviours around such learning in a post-1992 institution, and discusses the implications for EdD leadership and management teams when trying to consider and implement changes to established organizational cultures.
    • Dragging the corpse: Landscape and memory.

      Cashdan, Liz; McCrory, Moy; University of Derby (Multilingual Matters, 2015-04-01)
      Writers have always used the land to represent what it is to be human and have used landscape as a vehicle for emotion and identity. In probing the question does a nation write the people, or do the people write the nation, the writer confronts their own sense of belonging , their adherence and divergence. No longer figures in a landscape, we become the frame through which landscape must pass on its way to a re-consideration and a re-inscription. Exploring the inner lands in response to environment.
    • Edens: A 360 degree digital poem

      Bishton, Joanne; Higson, Rob; Buckner, Adrian; McNally Mary; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2015)
      Edens is a 360 degree digital poem exploring the idea of the self in the landscape.
    • Gardens and gardening

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2009)
      The garden has been an informing metaphor for geographical thought for sometime and as an affective material object and gardening as a process in the figuring and refiguring of space. It has represented an ideal environment and culture, a rather pre-cultural, pre-human state in a number of world religions, and continues to reappear in contemporary geographical discussions of the sacred. These leitmotifs of human geography are significantly theorized through ideology, discourse, and power, where ‘the garden’ becomes iconic. Signifying identity as well as status, cultural capital and social difference, as well as social/cultural relations, the garden and ways of gardening emerge as expression. A more complex conceptualization of the garden and gardening emerge in debates concerning consumption, commodification, and identity. In recent decades, the garden as artifact has been increasingly transformed to gardening as practice and as significant in developing critical conceptual approaches to a range of ‘new’ cultural geographies. These shifts and developments accompany the increasing geographical interest in process, practice, and performance. The ‘nature’ dimensions relating to, and perhaps informed by, gardens and gardening emerge in new ways in terms of the conceptualizations of nature where significance and meaning may emerge through practice, and in relation to the nonhuman; and debates concerning the ethical and moral in human geography, including shifting symbolism of the garden and of gardening in relation to war and peace. These developments in human geographies have been enmeshed with wider humanities and social science thinking and beyond these, from art theory and social anthropology to environmental debate.
    • New Media and the Arab Spring of 2011

      Hudson, Robert Charles; Oboh, Godwin Ehiarekhian; University of Derby (Delmas Communications Ltd, 2012-09-07)
    • Part-time higher education in English colleges: Adult identities in diminishing spaces

      Esmond, Bill; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2016-01-21)
      Adult participation in higher education has frequently entailed mature students studying part time in lower-ranked institutions. In England, higher education policies have increasingly emphasised higher education provision in vocational further education colleges, settings which have extensive adult traditions but which mainly teach employment-based skills and are widely regarded as ‘outside’ higher education. This paper interrogates the significance of these dimensions of college higher education, through a qualitative study of identity formation by adult part-time students. Their accounts, developed through individual interviews and focus groups, emphasised the significance of work to their interpretations of higher education participation: these are compared here to a range of conceptualisations of identity that have been applied in relation to work organisations. This analysis indicates some of the ways in which pathways which adults may interpret as meaningful in terms of work-related identities may correspondingly be constrained by a narrow discourse of work-based skills and credentials.
    • The role of the teacher today

      Hayes, Dennis; Marshall, Toby; University of Derby (SCETT, 2016-03-31)
      This is a collection of essays based on themes discussed at conferences and seminars between 2009 and 2012 organised the Standing Committee for the Education and Training of Teachers (SCETT), a charity (Number 296425) established by the education trade unions in 1981. Visit www.scett.org.uk for more information. A limited number of hard copies of the book are available from Professor Dennis Hayes at the University of Derby for £4.30 which includes postage and packing (email d.hayes@derby.ac.uk) or find the book on Amazon.
    • Unravelling Space and Landscape in Leisure Identities

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015)
      This chapter considers leisure identities through the occurrence of landscape. Prevailing notions of landscape are questioned and critiques, from the notion of what landscape is, so as to work towards a discussion of the relationships between ourselves, landscape and 'place' in the doing of leisure