• Customer satisfaction with career guidance: a literature review

      Hooley, Tristram; Neary, Siobhan; Morris, Marian; Mackay, Susan; SQW; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) (2016-03)
      This paper reports on the findings from a review of the literature relating to customer satisfaction with career guidance services. The review finds that reported levels of satisfaction with career guidance are typically high (ranging between 70-89%). However, it also reveals that there are challenges in measuring customer satisfaction in a consistent way and questions around the extent to which customer satisfaction correlates with other desirable outcomes of career guidance, such as career management skills and progression to further learning and work. The review sets out a model of factors that influence customer satisfaction which includes the individual and their expectations, the context in which the service is delivered, how the service is delivered and how the interaction is followed up. At present, there is little hard evidence suggesting a clear link between customer satisfaction and the other two outcomes that the National Careers Service is interested in (career management skills and progression).
    • Developing your career: harnessing the power of the internet for “digital career management”

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Emerald, 2017)
      Purpose This paper aims to discuss the role of the internet in framing individual’s career building. It argues that the 7 Cs of digital career literacy offer a useful framework for those working in learning and development in organizations. Every individual needs to engage with the internet when thinking about how to manage and future-proof their careers. Learning and development (L&D) professionals can support employees to harness the power of the internet and learn how to make use of the new opportunities of “digital career management”. Design/methodology/approach This paper highlights steps that every individual needs to take for “digital career management” and pulls out the role of L&D professionals in addressing the developing internet context. Findings Sets out “7 C’s” for proactively managing a “digital career profile”. Originality/value The internet has shifted the context for career building and learning how to maximize the opportunities now offered is the central task for anyone wishing to carve out their future careers.
    • Introducing the LEADER Framework for Careers (1.0)

      Neary, Siobhan; Hooley, Tristram; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) (2016-10)
      The LEADER Framework for Careers sets out five main areas that all citizens should attend to as they develop their careers: personal effectiveness; managing relationships; finding and accessing work; managing life and career; and understanding the world. Under each of these five areas the framework details a series of career management skills. These career management skills provide tools for educators to focus their curriculum, for counsellors to shape their interactions with clients and for policy makers in considering what programmes to fund or promote. The LEADER Framework for Careers has been developed by the LEarning And Decision making Resources (LEADER) project. This Erasmus + project has been established to support lifelong learning guidance services to help individuals to develop career management skills. Career Management Skills (CMS) is the term used to describe the skills, attributes, attitudes and knowledge that individuals require in order to manage their career. The project has been undertaken by a consortium of European organisations drawn from Italy, Spain, Romania, Greece, Turkey and the UK.
    • Maximising the impact of careers services on career management skills: a review of the literature

      Mackay, Susan; Morris, Marian; Hooley, Tristram; Neary, Siobhan; SQW; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) (2016-04)
      The review identified an international body of work on the development and implementation of competency frameworks in reaction to CMS, including the ‘Blueprint’ frameworks, which are a series of inter-related national approaches to career management skills (originating in the USA and taken up subsequently, and with different emphases, by Canada, Australia, England and Scotland). There is, as yet, little empirical evidence to support the overall efficacy of CMS frameworks, but they have the advantage of setting out what needs to be learned (usually as a clear and identifiable list of skills, attributes and attitudes) and, often, how this learning is intended to happen. The international literature emphasised the iterative nature and mixture of formal and informal learning and life experiences that people needed to develop CMS. It suggested that, though there was no single intervention or group of interventions that appeared most effective in increasing CMS, there were five underpinning components of career guidance interventions that substantially increased effectiveness, particularly when combined. These included the use of narrative/writing approaches; the importance of providing a ‘safe’ environment; the quality of the adviser-client relationship; the need for flexibility in approach; the provision of specialist information and support; and clarity on the purpose and aims of action planning. The review also identified a possible emergent hierarchy around the efficacy of different modes of delivery of career guidance interventions on CMS development. Interventions involving practitioner contact and structured groups appeared more effective than self-directed interventions or unstructured groups. Computer-based interventions were found to work better when practitioner input was provided during the intervention or when they were followed up by a structured workshop session to discuss and review the results.
    • Understanding career management skills: findings from the first phase of the CMS LEADER project

      Neary, Siobhan; Dodd, Vanessa; Hooley, Tristram; International Centre for Guidance Studies (2016)