• Career development training, certification, supervision and professionalization: case examples from four countries.

      Neault, Roberta; Artess, Jane; Tien, Hsiu-Lan Shelley; Hopkins, Sareena; Arulmani, Gideon; University of Derby (Indian Association of Career and Livelihood Planning (IACLP), 2016-12)
      The career development sector is professionalizing internationally, through training, certifications, and an abundance of opportunities to learn from colleagues at conferences and international symposia. However, there are significant differences in how the profession is developing in different parts of the world; the notion of “career” is recognized as culturebound and, perhaps, inconceivable to many individuals. In this paper, career development educators from four countries in Asia, North America, and Europe share case examples of the career development sector’s evolution in their regions. Together, they represent institutions and training programs from the public and private sectors, in both formal and informal settings. Several of the authors have been influential in introducing and customizing career development practitioner competency frameworks and training for practitioners from diverse backgrounds to meet certification requirements. Together they examine how professionalizing the delivery of career development services has emerged in their regions, the variety of training opportunities available along a continuum from preparation for practice to reflection of practice, the diversity of standards and certifications in the career development sector, and the early stages of addressing the need for training and equipping supervisors and leaders. The authors advocate a “both/and” approach to professionalization, grounded in local research that surfaces felt needs and then customizing training, resources, and standards that incorporate relevant elements from international sources
    • Changing employer practices in graduate recruitment: implications for career development

      Hirsh, Wendy; Pollard, Emma; Artess, Jane; HECSU (National Institute for Career Education and Counselling (NICEC), 2015-10)
      A major study of the changing graduate recruitment practices of UK employers, was conducted during 2014 by the Institute for Employment Studies (IES) and the Higher Education Careers Services Unit (HECSU) for the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS). It involved in-depth interviews with 76 employers (diverse by size and sector) and 30 'stakeholders' in graduate employment, including university careers services. The qualitative data were complemented by analysis of existing quantitative data on graduate employment and a wide ranging literature review. This article reports on selected findings relevant to career development professionals, including: the challenges for employers of attracting appropriate applicants; employers' generic skill needs and views on employability; the changing reasons and criteria for targeting specific higher education (HE) institutions; and employers' increasingly strategic use of work experience in graduate recruitment.
    • Dealing with the ever changing policy landscape: Learning from international practice

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Career Development Association of New Zealand, 2016)
    • New strategy to transform the quality of careers education, advice and guidance for young people

      Andrews, David; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2016)
      This paper, based on David's experience of having been directly involved in careers work for young people over 35 years, offers some personal suggestions about what should be included in the forthcoming strategy for careers education and guidance. The aim of this strategy should be to ensure that the careers support that young people experience provides them with the help that they need to progress successfully through learning and into work. It should prepare them for lives and careers where they will have to navigate a complex and challenging landscape of education, training and employment.
    • The uncertain story of career development

      Bright, Jim; International Centre for Guidance Studies (International Centre for Guidance Studies, College of Education, University of Derby, 2016)
      In this paper, the central role of uncertainty in career development and its implications for counselling, coaching and education practice as well as policy will be explored. It is argued that although uncertainty was recognised in the earliest formulations of career counselling models, it was subsequently largely ignored or deemed unimportant in nearly all of the dominant theories of career development for the remainder of the 20th century. More recently theorists have begun to acknowledge once more the central importance of uncertainty in career development, and more broadly in areas as diverse as science and politics. The reasons and importance of this renewed focus is explored with particular emphasis on chaos and complexity theories. The Chaos Theory of Careers (CTC) (Pryor & Bright, 2011) will be presented as theory that provides a powerful way of understanding the relationship between order and chaos, pattern and surprise as composites not opposites. Accepting that uncertainty is an inevitable, inescapable and ubiquitous part of life leads to new approaches to career development practice, theory and policy.
    • Young Enterprise: Evaluating the impact of the Team programme

      Moore, Nicki; Sahar, Arif; Robinson, Deborah; Hoare, Malcolm; University of Derby (2016)
      This report sets out the findings of the evaluation of the Team programme conducted by the International Centre for Guidance Studies at the University in 2016. The project adopted a mixed methodology which focussed on the experiences of staff, students and business advisers in a sample of twenty schools selected from a possible 40 which are funded for the Team programme as part of the DfE Character programme. The research findings are encouraging and show that the Team programme has a positive impact on the development of the knowledge, skills and attitudes required by young people to make a successful transition to learning, work and the adult world.