• Career development training, certification, supervision and professionalization: case examples from four countries.

      Neault, Roberta; Artess, Jane; Tien, Hsiu-Lan Shelley; Hopkins, Sareena; Arulmani, Gideon; University of Derby (Indian Association of Career and Livelihood Planning (IACLP), 2016-12)
      The career development sector is professionalizing internationally, through training, certifications, and an abundance of opportunities to learn from colleagues at conferences and international symposia. However, there are significant differences in how the profession is developing in different parts of the world; the notion of “career” is recognized as culturebound and, perhaps, inconceivable to many individuals. In this paper, career development educators from four countries in Asia, North America, and Europe share case examples of the career development sector’s evolution in their regions. Together, they represent institutions and training programs from the public and private sectors, in both formal and informal settings. Several of the authors have been influential in introducing and customizing career development practitioner competency frameworks and training for practitioners from diverse backgrounds to meet certification requirements. Together they examine how professionalizing the delivery of career development services has emerged in their regions, the variety of training opportunities available along a continuum from preparation for practice to reflection of practice, the diversity of standards and certifications in the career development sector, and the early stages of addressing the need for training and equipping supervisors and leaders. The authors advocate a “both/and” approach to professionalization, grounded in local research that surfaces felt needs and then customizing training, resources, and standards that incorporate relevant elements from international sources
    • Changing employer practices in graduate recruitment: implications for career development

      Hirsh, Wendy; Pollard, Emma; Artess, Jane; HECSU (National Institute for Career Education and Counselling (NICEC), 2015-10)
      A major study of the changing graduate recruitment practices of UK employers, was conducted during 2014 by the Institute for Employment Studies (IES) and the Higher Education Careers Services Unit (HECSU) for the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS). It involved in-depth interviews with 76 employers (diverse by size and sector) and 30 'stakeholders' in graduate employment, including university careers services. The qualitative data were complemented by analysis of existing quantitative data on graduate employment and a wide ranging literature review. This article reports on selected findings relevant to career development professionals, including: the challenges for employers of attracting appropriate applicants; employers' generic skill needs and views on employability; the changing reasons and criteria for targeting specific higher education (HE) institutions; and employers' increasingly strategic use of work experience in graduate recruitment.
    • Employability: A review of the literature 2012-2016

      Artess, Jane; Mellors-Bourne, Robin; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Higher Education Academy (HEA), 2017)
      This report, commissioned of the University of Derby, examines 187 pieces of research published between 2012 and 2016. It describes how the subject of employability has been addressed during this period and draws out some of the key implications for higher education providers (HEPs), academics and employability practitioners.
    • Evaluation of Careers Yorkshire and the Humber: inspiration activity and good practice guide.

      Artess, Jane; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2016-03)
      The evaluation captures the work of Careers Yorkshire and the Humber in their response to the government's 'inspiration agenda' which aims to support schools, colleges and prisons to inspire career aspiration in young people. Careers Yorkshire and the Humber is a regional provider of the National Careers Service.
    • Future First: Alumni in the Curriculum Evaluation 2015

      Artess, Jane; Hooley, Tristram; Shepherd, Claire; University of Derby (Future First, 2017-01)
    • H.E. Careers & Employability Services’ use of resources: Summary report

      Artess, Jane; Shepherd, Claire; International Centre for Guidance Studies; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2016)
    • Masters with a purpose: summary report

      Artess, Jane; Ball, Charlie; Forbes, Peter; Hughes, Tristram; HECSU (Universities UK, 2014-05)
      This report documents and explores higher education institutions' engagement with employers in respect of postgraduate taught Masters courses. Findings suggest that there might be better outcomes for graduates and employers where Masters study is approached in a 'purposeful' way.
    • Taught postgraduate employability and employer engagement: Masters with a purpose, Higher Education Careers Services Unit, Universities UK

      Artess, Jane; Ball, Charlie; Forbes, Peter; Hughes, Tristram; Higher Education Careers Services Unit (Universities UK, 2014-05)
      This report documents and explores higher education institutions' engagement with employers in respect of postgraduate taught Masters courses. Findings suggest that there might be better outcomes for graduates and employers where Masters study is approached in a 'purposeful' way.
    • Understanding employers' graduate recruitment and selection practices. BIS Research Paper 231.

      Pollard, Emma; Hirsh, Wendy; Williams, Matthew; Buzzeo. Jonathan; Marvell, Rosa; Tassinari, Arianna; Bertram, Christine; Fletcher, Luke; Artess, Jane; Redman, Jennifer; et al. (Department for Business, Innovation and Skills, 2015)
      This research examined the approach to graduate recruitment adopted by employers and how this has evolved in recent years. In particular the study aimed to explore patterns in graduate recruitment, behaviours of graduate employers and interactions between graduate employers and universities. It therefore provides a picture of long-term trends in practice from pre-recruitment activities through to entry, induction and beyond, and before, during and after the recession; and indicates the ways in which employers’ thinking about recruitment and selection have, and are, changing and developing. The research was driven by a need to update the evidence and understanding of recruitment practice as the population of graduates has increased dramatically and become more heterogeneous; the labour market has changed, emerging from difficult economic conditions; and there is increasing policy interest in diversity and particularly in social mobility.