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  • In Tune with the Listener: How Local Radio in Ireland has Maintained Audience Attention and Loyalty

    McMahon, Daithí; University of Derby (Bastas Publications, 2021-07-18)
    Local radio has remained relevant and ever-present in Ireland owing to the relationship stations have built with their audiences over time. These strong connections combined with adherence to public service duties and supplying locally relevant content – which the national stations cannot offer – helped local stations repel the double threat of a global recession and the influx of new media. This paper argues that by building on its core strengths while embracing change and adopting the potential offered by digital and social media, local Irish commercial radio stations have managed to survive and remain relevant. Using case studies of two prominent stations Radio Kerry and Beat, and one public service station RTÉ 2fm, this paper will illustrate that by being in tune with the audience’s unique social, cultural and political interests, radio stations have been able to endear their audiences to the brand and compete for their attention in an increasingly competitive mediascape. These stations were able to achieve this partly through the formation of online communities on Facebook, by having a presence in the local community and by actively engaging with the audience. This paper posits that local radio holds an important place in the lives of the people it serves and therefore must be preserved as not only an invaluable public service but as a beacon of culture and heritage.
  • Science fiction theatre: The theatre of the future

    Callow, Christos Jr; University of Derby (Liverpool University Press, 2022)
    This is the first academic monograph on 21st century science fiction theatre.
  • Plas Newydd’s Poetics of Exchange: Portraiture, Poetry and the Intermediality of Eighteenth-Century Gift Culture

    Gowrley, Freya; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2022)
    This article uses eighteenth-century correspondence and diurnal writing to unpack the complex networks of emotional, artistic, and poetic exchange that surrounded Plas Newydd, the home of the so-called “Ladies of Llangollen,” Sarah Ponsonby and Lady Eleanor Butler. It focuses on the gifting of a printed copy of George Romney’s painting Serena Reading (1782) given to the women by the poet Anna Seward, viewed by the trio as a portrait. Using an interdisciplinary and microhistorical approach, the article places the image within two contexts: firstly, within an intricate display of gifted portraits at Plas Newydd, and secondly, in relation to Seward’s poetry. In so doing, it argues for the centrality of the cultural, emotional, and intellectual process of exchange as a way for understanding the emotional life of the period. By focusing on the literary lives of this portrait-object, the article also demonstrates the necessity of an intermedial approach to eighteenth-century visual and material culture, highlighting the productive possibilities of using textual sources to consider long-lost artworks.
  • International centre for guidance studies (iCeGS) Annual Review

    Neary, Siobhan; Moore, Nicki; Blake, Hannah; Hanson, Jill; Staunton, Tom; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2021-12-09)
  • “This town is as full of enchantments as the White Cat’s Palace”: Whitby as a Locus for Writers’ Inspiration

    Derbyshire, Val; University of Derby (Daath Voyage, 2022-01-27)
    This article focuses upon the small North Yorkshire town of Whitby in Britain and analyses its prolific literary heritage. Most famous as the birthplace of Bram Stoker’s novel Dracula, recent research into the literary heritage of the area reveals that the town has proved an inspiration for a large number of texts across all literary genres. This paper focuses upon why Whitby is such a locus of inspiration for British writers. It analyses how often texts which claim a provenance to the town, link to other texts which make similar claims. This paper explores this intertextuality, how one story is entwined with another, implying that one Whitby text seems almost inevitably to lead to another. It also considers how the texts which come from the town tend to be outward looking, establishing links with other famous texts from the wider world.
  • Student carer experiences of higher education and support: a scoping review

    Runacres, J.; Herron, D.; Buckless, K.; Worrall, S.; Staffordshire University; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2021-10-30)
    Student carers are students who provide unpaid support to an individual who could not manage without their care. A scoping review was undertaken to determine the themes and concepts which underpin student carers’ experiences within higher education, examine student carers’ experiences of support and identify any gaps in the literature. A comprehensive literature search was conducted between February and May 2020. The search yielded 2,484 items, of which 14 articles were included in the review. Data from each article were extracted, charted and analysed using thematic analysis. The articles revealed that caring responsibilities could have a negative impact on student carers’ physical and mental health, university performance and financial status. Both formal and informal sources of support were referenced. Further, it was noted that universities had rigid rules and policies which did not suit the flexible needs of student carers. A paucity of research examined the impact studying had on student’s ability to provide care. Finally, issues relating to research design were observed, and a lack of demographic information or detail on the caring duties performed was found. A more robust evidence base is required to facilitate the development of interventions to support student carers in education
  • 'Ephemeral are Gay Gulps of Laughter’: P. B. Shelley, Louis Macneice, and the Ambivalence of Laughter

    Davis, Amanda Blake; University of Sheffield (Oxford University Press (OUP), 2020-11-18)
    Ambivalence is the hallmark of Shelley’s poetry, but the ambivalence of Shelley’s often underappreciated wit remains a relatively uncharted area of critical exploration. The characterization of laughter as ‘heartless fiend’ – or ‘heartless friend’ – in Shelley’s sonnet ‘To Laughter’ underscores this very ambivalence while also spotlighting the sociality of laughter. Drawing upon the ancient Greek ambiguities of laughter as socially divisive and socially integrative, laughter in Shelley’s poetry vacillates between ostracizing bursts and harmonizing glee. This essay explores the ambivalence of Shelleyan laughter and its echo in the poetry of Louis MacNeice, prompted by the modern poet’s early interest in ‘a comparison of Shelley & Nietzsche & a deification of laughter’. MacNeice’s realist leanings remain coloured by Romantic predispositions throughout his career. With attention to Shelley and MacNeice’s Classical backgrounds, this essay reveals how Shelleyan laughter echoes throughout MacNeice’s poetry and, in its ambivalence, unveils the extent to which identity is unfixed for both poets.
  • Androgyny as Mental Revolution in Act 4 of Prometheus Unbound

    Davis, Amanda Blake; University of Sheffield (Informa UK Limited, 2020-10-28)
    Apart from in his translation of Plato’s Symposium as The Banquet, the word ‘androgyny’ does not appear within Shelley’s writings, but androgynous images are extant throughout his works. The androgynous union of Asia and Prometheus, the ungendering of Demogorgon, and the Earth and the Moon’s shifting gendered pronouns in Act 4 echo Shelley’s desire for ‘a future state of being’ wherein ‘these detestable distinctions [of male and female] will surely be abolished’. The Banquet is a catalyst for the lyrical drama’s composition, wherein androgyny becomes Shelley’s central strategy for inciting mental revolution in his audience of ideal readers. Shelley assumes the self-ordained role of Plato’s ideal reader through his creative translation of The Banquet, where the mental union of writer and translator radically expands androgyny as the traditional union of the masculine and the feminine to include the psychic union of the poet and the reader. Drawing upon the dialogic, dramatic form of Plato’s text, his subtle instruction of his reader, and his playfulness with gender, Shelley transmutes elements of The Banquet into verse in Prometheus Unbound in order to encourage a mental revolution in his own readership.
  • Making everyday meanings visible- investigating the use of multimodal map texts to articulate young children’s perspectives

    Gowers, Sophia Jane; University of Derby (Sage, 2021-12-08)
    The use of multimodal approaches to articulate young children’s perspectives are evident in a wide range of recent research. This paper explores the creation of multimodal map-texts as a strategy to engage with young children and articulate their perspectives. It describes the development of a flexible map-based approach that was used in home, early years and community settings with children aged four to five years in England. Illustrative examples are included in which children represented and shared their views on the image-based texts they encountered within their everyday lives through the creation of a multimodal map-text. In this approach to research, children are viewed as competent message creators whose engagements encompass a range of modes and media. Consideration was given to young children’s multimodal meaning-making practices throughout the act of mapping, as well as the resulting text. Taking this approach revealed knowledge, perspectives and contextual information which may otherwise have been overlooked. The paper concludes by identifying the contribution that children’s map-texts can make when building a picture of young children’s experiences, and appraises the advantages and limitations of map-making as a strategy for engaging with young children in research.
  • ‘The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few’ Support for children with SEND in times of austerity

    Bloor, Andy; university of derby (Routledge, 2020-10-20)
    This chapter considers some of the moral and theoretical perspectives around the debate surrounding the allocation of resources in schools in recent times. It examines if there are any moral imperatives around the debates on how we fund education for all children, but particularly those with a Special Educational Need and Disability (SEND). The author explores what responses we can and should make when faced with difficult choices around funding and what current theory and argument can do to support us in making considered, proactive, positive and empowering choices.
  • Spatial construction for ideational meaning: An analysis of interior design students’ multimodal projects

    Di Monte-Milner, Giovanna; Gill, Andrew; University of Derby; University of Johannesburg (Cumulus, 2021-09-28)
    Multimodality is an inter-disciplinary approach that considers communication to be more than just language. Multimodal studies focus mostly on the analysis of twodimensional printed, digital, and screen production. This paper explores a multimodal pedagogic approach used to teach students to create interior design projects as threedimensional ensembles, which we reflect upon to contribute to the framework of multimodality. This qualitative research begins with a review of multimodal discourse establishing language as a system of choice, and a relationship between spatial design and language. A case-study of students’ multimodal ensembles reveals how the design choices of mode, semiotic resource, modal affordance and inter-semiosis led to students producing rich and inclusive meaning, supporting a reproductive health mandate. An interpretive semiotic framework based on Hallidayan principles of Systemic-functional linguistics is developed for spatial meaning-making analysis for future projects. The findings offer a narrative metalanguage for spatial meaning-making, contributing to broader interior design discourse.
  • Towards ‘regenerative interior design’: exploring a student project

    Di Monte-Milner, Giovanna; University of Derby (Cumulus, 2021-09-28)
    Interior designers should design for regenerative systems in order to achieve advanced sustainability, beyond the current ‘neutral’ sustainable design approach. A broader and more positive regenerative design and development approach supports building social and natural capital within the new ecological paradigm. The interior design discipline has made little contribution to this agenda. This paper thus explores interior design strategies, which relate to regenerative design strategies, through a student project proactively implemented within the Interior Design department at the University of Derby, in an existing 3rd year module. A qualitative research design is used to analyse and code students’ proposals, using a constructivist, grounded theory approach. The results present ‘regenerative interior design strategies’. These varying strategies are used throughout the project, of which the most grounded tap into various social and environmental sustainability benefits. This can inform teaching about sustainability in interior design for a new ecological paradigm.
  • Evidence to the Parliamentary Inquiry on the Future of Journalism

    Conboy, Martin; Firmstone, Julie; Fox, Carl; Elliott-Harvey, Charlotte; Mulderrig, Jane; Saunders, Joe; Wragg, Paul; University of Derby (UK Parliament, 2020-04-30)
    Submission to the call for evidence to the House of Lords Select Committee on Communications and Digital: The future of Journalism.
  • Education as a catalyst for the social inclusion of people with learning disabilities

    Robinson, Deborah; Codina, Geraldene; Strogilos, Vasilis; Dimitrellou, Eleni; University of Derby; University of Southampton (Wiley, 2021-11-15)
    Our editorial for this special issue on ‘Education as a catalyst for social inclusion’ is divided into two sections. The first section focuses on the gaps in applied research in learning disability that this issue attempts to address. The second section outlines how each of the articles in this issue broadens our understanding of how education may catalyse (or sometimes restrict) social inclusion. These articles combine to enrich the data and debate available to people with learning disabilities, their families and advocates, policy makers and professional leaders about how to strengthen education’s capacity to enrich social inclusion.
  • Strange Affiliation

    Clegg, Matthew; University of Derby (Routledge, 2021-02-26)
    In considering a poetry of silence, this chapter asks how might poets empathise, or identify with the disenfranchised? How might they employ the technique of personae, or mask voice, to explore that identification, or give voice to the silenced? In Joseph Conrad’s story, ‘The Secret Sharer’ (1910), a sea captain feels a powerful affinity with a fugitive, often referring to him as his ‘double’ or ‘second self’. To what extent can poets also be ‘secret sharers’? How might this practice go beyond the limitations of conventional identity politics? In giving voice to the silenced, how can a poet avoid exploiting or misrepresenting their subject? Through empathy and identification with disenfranchised groups or individuals, can poets cross boundaries of gender, race or socio-economic grouping? An exploration of this perspective on the role and function of poetry expands on key aspects of process, poetics and technique as active challenges to repressive silence, to furnish a means of articulating what might otherwise remain unvoiced. This reveals how practical engagement with a particular writerly dilemma – the imperative to speak as if on behalf of another – reveals something deeper about the nature of poetry.
  • DerbyVoice

    McMahon, Daithí; Jones, Rhiannon; University of Derby (2021-07-19)
    DerbyVoice is a research project led by University of Derby academics Dr Rhiannon Jones and Dr Daithí McMahon that engaged 300 young people from areas of deprivation in Derby and at risk of exclusion from education to create a public art installation. From July 16-19, 2021, the project exhibited for four days on the grounds of Derby Cathedral and attracted 80-110 visitors each day. The artistic and dialogic methodology used the Social Higher Education Depot (S.H.E.D) to create a co-designed site-specific installation in a prominent city centre location to offer a platform for artistic expression and act as an instigator for change to enable and empower young people in the city. The physical installation was designed by University of Derby students, in consultation with the research leads for the DerbyVoice project and responded to the theme of youth voice. As well as featuring the work of several community development partners from the city, the researchers commissioned seven young Derby artists to create bespoke work through their medium (music, illustration, fine art, photography, videography, graphic design and urban art) with the objective of offering a springboard for their burgeoning artistic careers. DerbyVoice provides young people with opportunities to share their contemplations and reflections on their city and their current concerns – Black Lives Matter (BLM), education reform, employment and personal and mental well-being - issues exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. The research has identified key barriers including the lack of cultural integration outside of school and the positive impact of financial and family support on young artists. The aim of this project is to enhance well-being, widen access to the arts and increase cultural opportunities for young people in Derby. The researchers also aim to instigate a shift in thinking about formal education and redefine the way young people’s voices are understood and can influence policy and act as a call for social, cultural and political change. The research highlights the benefits of artistic installations as cultural and consultation spaces for stakeholders, the public and policy-makers to engage directly with urban youth, through creative place-making. The research actively contributes to the cultural offer in Derby and highlights the benefits of socially-engaged art with the aspiration that it could instigate similar projects in the future.
  • Our Story: Forging Connections Through Oral History

    McMahon, Daithí; University of Derby (2021-04-24)
    Our Story: A History of Irish in Derby is an oral history project that collects and shares the personal memories and experiences of members of the Irish diaspora (N=14) that emigrated to the Derby (UK) in the 1950s and 60s. Emigration has long been a part of Irish history and identity, and this project offers examples of the social, cultural and economic contributions the Irish have made to the Derby city and region. It offers a reminder of the diverse and multicultural make up of modern British society, while celebrating the strong links that exist between Ireland and the United Kingdom. In addressing the theme this case study is an example of how oral histories and first-person testimonies can help forge connections between different generations of the Irish community and help form their Irish identities. It also aims to form connections between different communities in Derby to foster a more vibrant sense of community and improve awareness and understanding of the Irish immigrant and diaspora experience. The research demonstrates how original testimonies can help to facilitate comparisons between the Irish and other diasporas in the UK to develop better understandings of the make-up of the diverse Derby community. This work demonstrates how important it is to be sensitive to social, cultural and historical context when examining the experiences and articulations of diaspora experiences. To offer context a 4-minute film will be shown which offers a sample of the project and the personal stories for the audience.
  • Our Story: The Experiences of Mid-Century Irish Emigrants to the UK

    McMahon, Daithí; University of Derby (2021-06-04)
    The purpose of Our Story: A History of the Irish in Derby was to gather the personal testimonials of the Irish diaspora in the city of Derby, England with a view to better understand their emigration and integration experiences as well as their contributions to the UK midlands region economically, socially and culturally. Particular focus was put on the members of the Irish community who migrated in the 1950s-60s as one of the largest cohorts of modern Irish emigrants. The 26-minute film of edited interviews offers a reminder of the diverse and multicultural make-up of modern British society, while celebrating the strong links that exist between Ireland and its closest neighbour, the United Kingdom, to foster greater understand and acceptance of other nationalities. This is especially poignant during the period of uncertainty caused by Brexit. The recordings act as an archive and indelible record of their experiences so that future generations can understand and appreciate their Irish culture and heritage and use these to develop their own identities. This work demonstrates how important it is to be sensitive to social, cultural and historical context when examining the experiences and articulations of diaspora experiences. This paper will share some of the common themes that arose from the interview data which carry many elements of nostalgia as participants recount their migratory experiences. To offer context a 4-minute extract will be shown which offers a flavour of the project.
  • Telling Our Story: Sharing the Experiences of Irish Emigrants Through Film

    McMahon, Daithí; University of Derby (2021-05-06)
    The purpose of Our Story: A History of the Irish in Derby was to gather the personal testimonials of the Irish diaspora in the city of Derby, England with a view to better understand their emigration and integration experiences as well as their contributions to the UK midlands region economically, socially and culturally. Particular focus was put on the members of the Irish community who migrated in the 1950s-60s as one of the largest cohorts of modern Irish emigrants. The 26-minute film of edited interviews offers a reminder of the diverse and multicultural make-up of modern British society, while celebrating the strong links that exist between Ireland and its closest neighbour, the United Kingdom, to foster greater understand and acceptance of other nationalities. This is especially poignant during the period of uncertainty caused by Brexit. The recordings act as an archive and indelible record of their experiences so that future generations can understand and appreciate their Irish culture and heritage and use these to develop their own identities. This work demonstrates how important it is to be sensitive to social, cultural and historical context when examining the experiences and articulations of diaspora experiences. This paper will share some of the common themes that arose from the interview data which carry many elements of nostalgia as participants recount their migratory experiences. To offer context a 4-minute extract will be shown which offers a flavour of the project. It is hoped this project may help inspire further oral history projects involving not only Irish but other cultural communities in the UK. Link to Our Story film: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTIOdA3nh5Q
  • Our Story: Preserving and Disseminating the Experiences of the Irish Diaspora in Derby

    McMahon, Daithí; University of Derby (2021-07-10)
    This paper proposes to discuss the project Our Story: A History of Irish in Derby (2020) as a case study for examination of the production process of editing over 8 hours of content from 14 contributors into an accessible 26-minute video for online public dissemination. Our Story is an oral history project that collects and shares the personal memories and experiences of the Irish diaspora who emigrated to Derby city in the 1950s and 60s. Emigration has long been a part of Irish history and identity, and this project acts as a recognition of the social, cultural and economic contributions the Irish have made to the Derby city and region. It also offers a reminder of the diverse and multicultural make up of modern British society, while celebrating the strong links that exist between Ireland and the United Kingdom. This paper discusses the value of capturing the personal experiences of the ageing members of our population before their memories fade. The recordings therefore act as an archive and indelible record of their experiences so that future generations can understand and appreciate their experiences and contributions and use these to develop their own identities. The production and editing decisions were difficult but necessary as the producers worked towards creating an engaging work with a coherent narrative from multiple voices that would be viewed by a wide audience. This work demonstrates how important it is to be sensitive to social, cultural and historical context when examining the experiences and articulations of diaspora experiences. To offer context a 4-minute audio visual piece will be shown which offers a sample of the project and the stories for the audience.

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