Recent Submissions

  • A holistic approach to the decolonisation of modules in sustainable interior design

    Di Monte-Milner, Giovanna; University of Johannesburg (Design Education Forum of Southern Africa, 2017-09)
    This paper stems from the need to develop and deliver a new module in sustainable interior design (BASD6B2) at a 2nd year level within a new Degree programme at the University of Johannesburg, in 2017. This module’s development however relies on a reflection on another sustainable interior design module (BASD6B1) in the curriculum, offered at a 1st year level. The paper also secondly arises from the national call for the transformation and decolonisation of education programmes in South African tertiary institutions. This new BASD6B2 module thus needs to demonstrate a deeper connection with African roots, rather than make use of over-emphasised Eurocentric ideals. Like the global Ubuntu education approach, decolonisation requires an advancement of indigenous knowledge, expertise, teaching and learning. Thirdly, there is also a need for interior design education, worldwide, to align itself with changing notions of sustainability, which requires educators to embrace a new, emerging ecological paradigm. In this paradigm, regenerative thinking seeks to push sustainable design from merely sustaining the health of a system, towards more holistic, systems thinking, reconnecting us to place and the rituals of place (Reed 2007, p. 677). A reflection on both the sustainable interior design modules’ designs reveals several gaps. Firstly, there is no specific requirement that the emerging ecological paradigm, and the notion of regenerative thinking, be taught within the module. Secondly, one of the module outcomes requires that students be taught about sustainability through the use of a rating tool, the Green Star SA (GSSA) Interiors Rating Tool, which, while valuable, is too mechanistic and does not support holistic thinking. Thirdly, another gap is that the Green Building Council of South Africa’s (GBCSA) Green Star SA – Interiors v1 Technical Manual includes little to no reference of African studies, methods and skills in the technical manual. This issue is revealed in my ongoing PhD study, which uses a constructivist grounded theory approach. Fourthly, the tool is based on an Australian tool which is, in turn, based on an American tool, and it thus deploys western constructs. The aim of this paper is thus to develop a teaching strategy that can complement the design of both modules, with a focus however on the new module BASD6B2, in order to teach students about sustainability more holistically, while celebrating and advancing African building methods and skills. The main findings reveal that the sustainable interior design modules (based on the given outcomes) do not support a holistic and decolonised approach to teaching and learning. A holistic teaching strategy is thus necessary to promote an African identity. The paper concludes that this pro-active teaching strategy can augment the sustainable interior design modules. Firstly both modules can include a holistic introductory lesson. A second tactic in the strategy could be to include diverse curriculum content and regenerative design concepts into the BASD6B2 module. This strategy generally aims to advance students’ mindsets about sustainable design, while encouraging them to be co-creators of local knowledge, while designing sustainably, for an African identity.
  • An effective pedagogical practise for integrating HIV and AIDS into tertiary education: an interior design case study

    Di Monte-Milner, Giovanna; Gill, A; University of Johannesburg (South African Journal of Higher Education, 2017)
    This article discusses a pedagogical practise used to introduce HIV and AIDS content into an existing Interior Design curriculum from a creative praxis perspective. Curriculum-integration is a key strategy of the Higher Education HIV/AIDS Programme (HEAIDS), which was established to develop and support HIV-mitigation programmes at South Africa’s public Higher Education Institutions. Students within the Faculty of Art, Design and Architecture at the University of Johannesburg engaged in a spatial intervention project that was structured around project-based learning strategies and constructivist teaching values. Students’ proposals were analysed against their ability to promote HIV and AIDS prevention and create appropriate meaning amongst the target group. The paper suggests that the methodology proved effective because it did not require radical curriculum transformation; aligned with existing programme outcomes; and demonstrated potential to contribute to the ‘new literacy of AIDS’ required to counter ‘AIDS fatigue’.
  • Addressing the needs of the other 90% - the role of cycling in developing the sustainable agenda in Johannesburg

    Di Monte-Milner, Giovanna; Breytenbach, Amanda; University of Johannesburg (The Greenside Design Centre, University of Johannesburg (CUMULUS), 2014)
    Cycling is an energy efficient nonpolluting form of transport and is considered as one of the most sustainable means of transport. In South Africa cycling has been poorly recognized and supported by government and citizens as a sustainable mode of transport. However, drastic changes are proposed for the transport systems in the City of Johannesburg (also Joburg) and citizens are showing a growing interest in cycling for both recreation and commuting purposes. This paper investigates the changing cycling culture in Johannesburg and the extent to which cycling is recognized by government and included in the development of a sustainability agenda that addresses the socio-economic needs of Johannesburg citizens. National cycling projects, cycling associations and cycling events such as the monthly Johannesburg Critical Bike Mass Ride events are briefly described and used as reference points to illustrate the growing interest expressed by non-profit organizations and citizens to accommodate cyclists on public roads. This investigation aims to make a contribution to the sustainable design project through reflecting on a drastic proposed change for Johannesburg city transport which will impact on various design disciplines that can provide specialist knowledge in the development of a sustainable transport system. This paper therefore acknowledge the complex dynamic system in which society operates and argue that through paying attention to the needs of citizens, designers can become co-creators within the system
  • Socrates for Teachers

    Hayes, Dennis; University of Derby (Routledge, 2019-04-04)
    This chapter introduces Plato’s Socrates and his philosophy. The nearest we can get to authentic Socratic thought is in Plato’s earlier dialogues where he presents the views of his tutor in powerful dramatic form. Socrates embodies in his life, and death, a commitment to freedom of speech that was not shared by the polis of Athens (or by most people today). Sections of Plato’s dramatic dialogues are presented at length to illustrate his life, his commitment to argument and to examining all beliefs however strongly held. Socrates embodies the critical spirit and the understanding that freedom of speech was the only way to knowledge. To convince anyone of the power of Socrates’ thinking and his moral example cannot be achieved through any introduction. The success of this chapter will be decided by those who go on to read the dialogues. If you stop here and pick up and read any of the Socratic dialogues, the Apology, the Crito, the Phaedo, the Protagoras, the Meno, or the Theaetetus then you will know the man without any intermediary other than Plato. The lesson of this chapter is: ‘always study the original texts’.
  • A culture of youth: young people, youth organisations and mass participation in Cuba 1959-62.

    Luke, Anne; University of Derby (Paradigm/ Routledge, 2014-06-30)
  • Youth organizations in revolutionary Cuba, 1959–1962: from Unidad to Vanguardia

    Luke, Anne; University of Derby (Routledge, 2016)
    The ubiquitous billboards in Cuba featuring the emblem of the Young Communist League (UJC) are part of the landscape of the revolution. The profiles of Che Guevara, Camilo Cienfuegos, and Julio Antonio Mella, staring into a blissful future under the slogan “Estudio, Trabajo, Fusil” (Study, Work, Rifle) are among the most recognizable motifs of communist Cuba. Such organization came from the first three years of the revolution; its existence cannot be taken for granted. The enthusiasm of the early years is not in doubt, but a closer assessment of the search for stability and meaning is timely. Youth is a case in point. The high expectations, uncertainty, and excitement for young people become evident through an examination of the evolution of youth organizations between 1959 and 1962. Initiatives aimed at unity largely coordinated by the Young Socialists (JS), the ascendance of a culture of mass participation with the meteoric rise of the Association of Young Rebels (AJR), and the creation of the UJC in 1962 show the move to selectivity and youth politics as opposed to other, broader initiatives. The story of the youth organizations not only reveals the reasons behind the failure to sustain a mass organization for young people, but also the rapid change and levels of uncertainty to which young Cubans were exposed in the early years of the revolution as they sought to be and become young rebels and young communists within an evolving social revolution
  • Values production through social and emotional learning

    Wood, Peter; University of Derby (Routledge, 2015)
    This chapter considers if social and emotional learning(SEL) schemes have the potential to marginalise and promote certain values, norms and behaviours, to guard against cultural pollution. It explores the historical underpinnings of values education and highlights concerns regarding values production via the national and hidden curriculum. Education serves a function for society as it should shape social beings by instilling shared moral traditions, practices and ideals. Such opinion is also demonstrable in terminology of various acts of parliament in the United Kingdom, like 1944 Education Act and the Education Reform Act 1988, which both identified the central role of education system in values production. The National Curriculum, which stemmed from latter of these acts, was the first step in explicitly recognising the integral tenet of schooling in shaping the values of pupils, by making it compulsory for schools. Current educational policy and its narrow emphasis on academic performance is one of the obvious barriers to the realisation of mutual reach.
  • Listening to Los Beatles: being young in 1960s Cuba

    Luke, Anne; University of Derby (Indiana University Press, 2013)
  • Acquisition, development and maintenance of maths anxiety in young children

    Petronzi, Dominic; Staples, Paul; Sheffield, David; Hunt, Thomas; University of Derby (Routledge, 2019-02-18)
  • Dogs and the elderly: significant cohabitation and companionship towards the end of life

    Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (2019-04-29)
    We seek comfort from other beings and this often finds a solution in our relationships with dogs. Walter Benjamin said “no single dog is physically or temperamentally like another,” which in part attests to our interspecies domestic closeness based on reliance and need. Nowhere is this seen more than in their companionship with the elderly. The positivity for health of a life with dogs is relevant to the elderly, those may feel isolated and vulnerable without another with whom to share life. Here, dogs become a vital companion, alleviating depression and isolation and giving a sense of usefulness. Although sharing one’s life with a dog gives purpose and comfort, it also brings anxieties regarding care and separation should that relationship change or cease. For the elderly, this concerns being worried of their dog’s fate should they enter managed housing or care facilities, or if separated by illness or death. The ‘burden’ they would leave sees the elderly intentionally deny homing another dog should theirs die. This denial renders the dog a last memorial to the significance of the companionship that informed life. This presentation discusses my art project ‘Dogs and the Elderly’ that focuses on the significance and benefit of interspecies companionship towards the end of life. This project with the Alzheimer’s Society demonstrates how interspecies cohabitation is valuable for emotional health and wellbeing. Participants offer heart-warming and heart- breaking accounts of a lonelier and dog-free life when their current companion becomes their last. The fear of not being able to ensure safe continuing care produces a self-imposed loneliness, one where it seems better to know they will not commit a dog to an unknown future than to benefit from their friendship now. The dog becomes the living remains of a relationship that can no longer be accommodated.
  • Dogs and the elderly

    Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (2019-04-09)
    We seek comfort from other beings, which in the absence of other humans often finds a solution in relationships with dogs. The positivity for health is particularly relevant to the elderly, who may be especially isolated and emotionally vulnerable. Although sharing one’s life with a dog gives purpose and comfort, it also brings anxieties regarding care and separation should that relationship change or cease. For the elderly, this concerns being worried for the dog’s fate should they be separated by entering housing or care facilities, or by illness or death. This seminar discusses the dilemma of leaving a ‘burden’ through the art project ‘Dogs and the Elderly,’ which analyses the importance of the interspecies relationships for physical and emotional health and wellbeing.
  • Folklinguistics and social meaning in Australian English.

    Penry Williams, Cara; La Trobe University; University of Derby (Routledge, 2019-09-30)
    Folklinguistics and Social Meaning in Australian English presents an original study of Australian English and, via this, insights into Australian society. Utilising folklinguistic accounts, it uncovers everyday understandings of contemporary Australian English through variations across linguistic systems (sounds, words, discourse and grammar). Focusing on one variation at time, it explores young speakers’ language use and their evaluations of the same forms. The analysis of talk about talk uncovers ethnic, regional and social Others in social types and prevailing ideologies around Australian English essential for understanding Australian identity-making processes, as well as providing insights and methods relevant beyond this context. These discussions demonstrate that while the linguistic variations may occur in other varieties of English, they are understood through local conceptualisations, and often as uniquely Australian. This book harnesses the value and richness of discourse in explorations of the sociocultural life of language. The findings show that analysis attending to language ideologies and identities can help discover the micro–macro links needed in understanding social meanings. The volume explores a wide range of language features but also provides a deep contemplation of Australian English.
  • Perspectives on musical time in the development of performance systems for live electronic music.

    Vandemast-Bell, Paul; Ferguson, John; University of Derby; Griffith University (Routledge, 2019-07-12)
  • Overview of childhood (Mexico).

    Delgado-Fuentes, Marco Antonio; University of Derby (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2019)
  • Friendship and peer cultures in childhood (Mexico).

    Fritz Macias, Heidi; Universidad Iberoamericana (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2019)
  • Special needs and disabilities in childhood (Mexico).

    Reyes, Andrea Saldivar; Guzmán Zamora, Josué; Universidad de Tlaxcala (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2019)
  • Agency and rights in childhood (Mexico).

    Martínez, José Francisco; ACUDE (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2019)
  • Migration and mobility in childhood (Mexico).

    Mancillas Bazan, Celia; Figueroa Diaz, Maria Elena; Universidad Iberoamericana (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2019)
  • Bilingualism and multilingualism in early childhood education (Mexico).

    Mendoza-Zuany, Rosa Guadalupe; Delgado-Fuentes, Marco Antonio; University of Derby; Universidad Veracruzana (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2019)
  • Special educational needs and disabilities in early childhood education (Mexico).

    Reyes, Andrea Saldivar; Guzmán Zamora, Josué; Universidad de Tlaxcala (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2019-01-02)

View more