• An evaluation of a specialist service model for treating Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD): application of the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence Guidelines for BDD (NICE, 2006).

      Stalmeisters, Dzintra; Townend, Michael; Govender, ANUSHA (University of Derby, 2020-02)
      Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is still poorly recognised with a dearth of research into treatment. This is the only known study to date to evaluate the implementation of the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines recommended treatment for BDD in clinical practice as well as providing qualitative data of both patients and clinicians (NICE, 2006). The study aims to evaluate current recommended treatments for Body Dysmorphic Disorder utilised in a specialist service for BDD. In addition the study elicits the experiences of patients receiving treatment and the clinicians providing the treatment. This provides a basis to assess if refinements are to be made to treatment protocols for BDD in this specialist service. A mixed methods approach was employed with quantitative data from patients treated for BDD collated from the Trust’s database and examined with intention to treat analysis. Thematic Analysis (TA) was used to analyse data from semi-structured interviews conducted with clinical staff and patients to elicit their experiences of respectively providing and receiving treatment. The clinical data indicated impairment in patients’ functioning plus high risks and substance misuse. Treatment outcomes of NICE recommended CBT and medication (Selective Serotonergic Reuptake Inhibitors and augmentation) produced significant improvements in BDD symptoms in patients with severe symptoms at baseline. Patients also showed significant improvements in depression and overall functioning. However despite improvements symptoms were not completely eliminated and one group treated by the service (Level 6 outpatients) showed minimal to no improvement on all symptom measures. Both clinician and patient participants expressed dissatisfaction with the lack of sufficient knowledge and expertise for treating BDD. Both groups also placed high value on the therapeutic relationship. However clinicians interviewed indicated a higher dissatisfaction with current treatment options for BDD than patients. The experiences of patients provided a different perspective to the findings in the quantitative phase. Their view of improvements was based on their functioning and overall quality of life. Clinicians’ perspectives provided insight into other options for treatment which are lacking and could provide substantial support for current recommendations. Given the evidence base for recommended treatments is still limited, it is essential to include qualitative data in evaluating effectiveness of treatment and in developing services that respond to patient needs and choice.