UDORA is currently undergoing maintenance and during this time you will not be able to submit to the Repository. Apologies for any inconvenience caused and thank you for your patience.

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLu, Yiling
dc.contributor.authorMichel, C. C.
dc.contributor.authorWang, Wen
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-10T16:11:24Z
dc.date.available2014-03-10T16:11:24Z
dc.date.issued2012-05
dc.identifier.citationInert gas clearance from tissue by co-currently and counter-currently arranged microvessels 2012, 113 (3):487 Journal of Applied Physiologyen
dc.identifier.issn8750-7587
dc.identifier.issn1522-1601
dc.identifier.doi10.1152/japplphysiol.00006.2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/313833
dc.description.abstractTo elucidate the clearance of dissolved inert gas from tissues, we have developed numerical models of gas transport in a cylindrical block of tissue supplied by one or two capillaries. With two capillaries, attention is given to the effects of co-current and counter-current flow on tissue gas clearance. Clearance by counter-current flow is compared with clearance by a single capillary or by two co-currently arranged capillaries. Effects of the blood velocity, solubility, and diffusivity of the gas in the tissue are investigated using parameters with physiological values. It is found that under the conditions investigated, almost identical clearances are achieved by a single capillary as by a co-current pair when the total flow per tissue volume in each unit is the same (i.e., flow velocity in the single capillary is twice that in each co-current vessel). For both co-current and counter-current arrangements, approximate linear relations exist between the tissue gas clearance rate and tissue blood perfusion rate. However, the counter-current arrangement of capillaries results in less-efficient clearance of the inert gas from tissues. Furthermore, this difference in efficiency increases at higher blood flow rates. At a given blood flow, the simple conduction-capacitance model, which has been used to estimate tissue blood perfusion rate from inert gas clearance, underestimates gas clearance rates predicted by the numerical models for single vessel or for two vessels with co-current flow. This difference is accounted for in discussion, which also considers the choice of parameters and possible effects of microvascular architecture on the interpretation of tissue inert gas clearance.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://jap.physiology.org/cgi/doi/10.1152/japplphysiol.00006.2012en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Applied Physiologyen
dc.subjectBlood perfusionen
dc.subjectConduction-capacitance modelen
dc.subjectNumerical simulationen
dc.titleInert gas clearance from tissue by co-currently and counter-currently arranged microvesselsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Applied Physiologyen
html.description.abstractTo elucidate the clearance of dissolved inert gas from tissues, we have developed numerical models of gas transport in a cylindrical block of tissue supplied by one or two capillaries. With two capillaries, attention is given to the effects of co-current and counter-current flow on tissue gas clearance. Clearance by counter-current flow is compared with clearance by a single capillary or by two co-currently arranged capillaries. Effects of the blood velocity, solubility, and diffusivity of the gas in the tissue are investigated using parameters with physiological values. It is found that under the conditions investigated, almost identical clearances are achieved by a single capillary as by a co-current pair when the total flow per tissue volume in each unit is the same (i.e., flow velocity in the single capillary is twice that in each co-current vessel). For both co-current and counter-current arrangements, approximate linear relations exist between the tissue gas clearance rate and tissue blood perfusion rate. However, the counter-current arrangement of capillaries results in less-efficient clearance of the inert gas from tissues. Furthermore, this difference in efficiency increases at higher blood flow rates. At a given blood flow, the simple conduction-capacitance model, which has been used to estimate tissue blood perfusion rate from inert gas clearance, underestimates gas clearance rates predicted by the numerical models for single vessel or for two vessels with co-current flow. This difference is accounted for in discussion, which also considers the choice of parameters and possible effects of microvascular architecture on the interpretation of tissue inert gas clearance.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record