Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLindsay, Ellie
dc.contributor.authorConvery, Ian
dc.contributor.authorRamsey, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorSimmons, Eunice
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-14T16:37:02Z
dc.date.available2013-11-14T16:37:02Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationCHANGING PLACE: PALM OIL AND SENSE OF PLACE IN BORNEO 2012, 6 (2):45 HUMAN GEOGRAPHIES – Journal of Studies and Research in Human Geographyen
dc.identifier.issn18436587
dc.identifier.issn20672284
dc.identifier.doi10.5719/hgeo.2012.62.45
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/305396
dc.description.abstractThe conservation of tropical ecosystems is complex and contested, not least in terms of cultural and political perspectives between developed and developing nations (Bawa & Seidler, 1998; Colchester, 2000; Brosius & Hitchner, 2010). In Sabah, on the island of Borneo, Malaysia much of the forest has recently been converted to oil palm plantations. The plantations cover vast areas and leave relatively little space for native flora and fauna. Whilst efforts are underway to enhance biodiversity within the plantations, there is no clear consensus as to how this might best be achieved and this has led in part to divisions opening up amongst stakeholders (Othman & Ameer, 2009). A range of Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) working within Sabah endeavour to conserve threatened biodiversity; at the Governmental level there are significant drivers for development and economic stability; while the plantation owners are trying to improve their yields and increase their global market. There is also increasing consumer pressure in Europe and North America linked to concerns about the survival of iconic rainforest species such as orang-utans. This paper considers these issues within a context of globalisation and profound economic and social change within Malaysia.
dc.description.sponsorshipUKERCen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://humangeographies.org.ro/abstracts/62/625.htmlen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to HUMAN GEOGRAPHIES – Journal of Studies and Research in Human Geographyen
dc.subjectBiodiversityen
dc.subjectSense of placeen
dc.subjectPalm oilen
dc.subjectMalaysiaen
dc.titleChanging place: palm oil and sense of place in Borneoen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Cumbriaen
dc.identifier.journalHuman Geographies – Journal of Studies and Research in Human Geographyen
html.description.abstractThe conservation of tropical ecosystems is complex and contested, not least in terms of cultural and political perspectives between developed and developing nations (Bawa & Seidler, 1998; Colchester, 2000; Brosius & Hitchner, 2010). In Sabah, on the island of Borneo, Malaysia much of the forest has recently been converted to oil palm plantations. The plantations cover vast areas and leave relatively little space for native flora and fauna. Whilst efforts are underway to enhance biodiversity within the plantations, there is no clear consensus as to how this might best be achieved and this has led in part to divisions opening up amongst stakeholders (Othman & Ameer, 2009). A range of Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) working within Sabah endeavour to conserve threatened biodiversity; at the Governmental level there are significant drivers for development and economic stability; while the plantation owners are trying to improve their yields and increase their global market. There is also increasing consumer pressure in Europe and North America linked to concerns about the survival of iconic rainforest species such as orang-utans. This paper considers these issues within a context of globalisation and profound economic and social change within Malaysia.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record