Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorKopp, Franziska
dc.contributor.authorSchröger, Erich
dc.contributor.authorLipka, Sigrid
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-24T15:47:21Z
dc.date.available2013-06-24T15:47:21Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/294470
dc.description.abstractRehearsal mechanisms in human short-term memory are increasingly understood in the light of both behavioural and neuroanatomical findings. However, little is known about the cooperation of participating brain structures and how such cooperations are affected when memory performance is disrupted. In this paper we use EEG coherence as a measure of synchronization to investigate rehearsal processes and their disruption by irrelevant speech in a delayed serial recall paradigm. Fronto-central and fronto-parietal theta (4–7.5 Hz), beta (13–20 Hz), and gamma (35–47 Hz) synchronizations are shown to be involved in our short-term memory task. Moreover, the impairment in serial recall due to irrelevant speech was preceded by a reduction of gamma band coherence. Results suggest that the irrelevant speech effect has its neural basis in the disruption of left-lateralized fronto-central networks. This stresses the importance of gamma band activity for short-term memory operations.
dc.titleNeural networks engaged in short-term memory rehearsal are disrupted by irrelevant speech in human subjects
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalNeuroscience Lettersen
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T13:08:38Z
html.description.abstractRehearsal mechanisms in human short-term memory are increasingly understood in the light of both behavioural and neuroanatomical findings. However, little is known about the cooperation of participating brain structures and how such cooperations are affected when memory performance is disrupted. In this paper we use EEG coherence as a measure of synchronization to investigate rehearsal processes and their disruption by irrelevant speech in a delayed serial recall paradigm. Fronto-central and fronto-parietal theta (4–7.5 Hz), beta (13–20 Hz), and gamma (35–47 Hz) synchronizations are shown to be involved in our short-term memory task. Moreover, the impairment in serial recall due to irrelevant speech was preceded by a reduction of gamma band coherence. Results suggest that the irrelevant speech effect has its neural basis in the disruption of left-lateralized fronto-central networks. This stresses the importance of gamma band activity for short-term memory operations.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Kopp et al 2004_ preprint.pdf
Size:
91.13Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record