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dc.contributor.authorHuck, Maren*
dc.contributor.authorRotundo, Marcelo*
dc.contributor.authorFernández-Duque, Eduardo*
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-10T11:37:13Z
dc.date.available2013-06-10T11:37:13Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.citationGrowth and Development in Wild Owl Monkeys (Aotus azarai) of Argentina 2011, 32 (5):1133 International Journal of Primatologyen
dc.identifier.issn0164-0291
dc.identifier.issn1573-8604
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10764-011-9530-y
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/293710
dc.description.abstractLife history predicts that in sexually dimorphic species in which males are the larger sex, males should reach sexual maturity later than females (or vice versa if females are the larger sex). The corresponding prediction that in sexually monomorphic species maturational rates will differ little between the sexes has rarely been tested. We report here sex differences in growth and development to adulthood for 70 female and 69 male wild owl monkeys (Aotus azarai). In addition, using evidence from natal dispersal and first reproduction (mean: 74 mo) for 7 individuals of known age, we assigned ages to categories: infant, 0–6 mo; juvenile, 6.1–24 mo; subadult, 24.1–48 mo; adult >48 mo. We compared von Bertalanffy growth curves and growth rates derived from linear piecewise regressions for juvenile and subadult females and males. Growth rates did not differ between the sexes, although juvenile females were slightly longer than males. Females reached maximum maxillary canine height at ca. 2 yr, about a year earlier than males, and females’ maxillary canines were shorter than males’. Thus apart from canine eruption and possibly crown–rump length, the development of Azara’s owl monkeys conforms to the prediction by life history that in monomorphic species the sexes should develop at similar paces.
dc.description.sponsorshipWenner-Gren Foundation, the L.S.B. Leakey Foundation, the National Geographic Society, the National Science Foundation (BCS- 0621020), the University of Pennsylvania Research Foundation, and the Zoological Society of San Diego, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (HU 1746/2-1)en
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10764-011-9530-yen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to International Journal of Primatologyen
dc.subjectDevelopmenten
dc.subjectAotus azaraeen
dc.titleGrowth and development in wild Owl Monkeys (Aotus azarai) of Argentina
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Pennsylvaniaen
dc.contributor.departmentFundacion ECOen
dc.contributor.departmentCentro de Ecologia Aplicada del Litoral, CONICETen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Primatologyen
html.description.abstractLife history predicts that in sexually dimorphic species in which males are the larger sex, males should reach sexual maturity later than females (or vice versa if females are the larger sex). The corresponding prediction that in sexually monomorphic species maturational rates will differ little between the sexes has rarely been tested. We report here sex differences in growth and development to adulthood for 70 female and 69 male wild owl monkeys (Aotus azarai). In addition, using evidence from natal dispersal and first reproduction (mean: 74 mo) for 7 individuals of known age, we assigned ages to categories: infant, 0–6 mo; juvenile, 6.1–24 mo; subadult, 24.1–48 mo; adult >48 mo. We compared von Bertalanffy growth curves and growth rates derived from linear piecewise regressions for juvenile and subadult females and males. Growth rates did not differ between the sexes, although juvenile females were slightly longer than males. Females reached maximum maxillary canine height at ca. 2 yr, about a year earlier than males, and females’ maxillary canines were shorter than males’. Thus apart from canine eruption and possibly crown–rump length, the development of Azara’s owl monkeys conforms to the prediction by life history that in monomorphic species the sexes should develop at similar paces.


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