Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Michael A.
dc.contributor.authorSharpe, Graham R.
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Peter I.
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-24T14:52:07Z
dc.date.available2013-05-24T14:52:07Z
dc.date.issued2009-06
dc.identifier.citationInvestigations of the lactate minimum test. 2009, 30 (6):448-54 Int J Sports Meden
dc.identifier.issn1439-3964
dc.identifier.pmid19199204
dc.identifier.doi10.1055/s-0028-1119404
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/292752
dc.description.abstractWe evaluated: the agreement between lactate minimum and maximal lactate steady state (MLSS) cycling powers (study 1); whether rates of change of blood lactate concentration during the lactate minimum test reflect that of constant power exercise (study 2); whether the lactate minimum power is influenced by the muscle groups used to elevate blood lactate concentration (study 3). Study 1: 32 subjects performed a lactate minimum test comprising a lactate elevation phase, recovery phase, and incremental phase (five 4 min stages); MLSS was subsequently determined. Study 2: 8 subjects performed a lactate minimum test and five 22 min constant power tests at the incremental phase exercise intensities. Study 3: 10 subjects performed two identical lactate minimum tests, except during the second test the lactate elevation phase comprised arm-cranking. Lactate minimum and MLSS powers demonstrated good agreement (mean bias+/-95% limits of agreement: 2+/-22 W). Rates of change of blood lactate concentration during each incremental phase stage and corresponding constant power test did not correlate. Lactate minimum power was lowered when arm-cranking was used during the lactate elevation phase (157+/-29 vs. 168+/-21 W; p<0.05). The lactate elevation phase modifies blood lactate concentration responses during the incremental phase, thus good agreement between lactate minimum and MLSS powers seems fortuitous.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to International journal of sports medicineen
dc.subject.meshAdolescent
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshArm
dc.subject.meshBicycling
dc.subject.meshExercise test
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshLactic acid
dc.subject.meshLeg
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshYoung adult
dc.titleInvestigations of the lactate minimum test.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derby, Department of Sport and Exerciseen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Sports Medicineen
html.description.abstractWe evaluated: the agreement between lactate minimum and maximal lactate steady state (MLSS) cycling powers (study 1); whether rates of change of blood lactate concentration during the lactate minimum test reflect that of constant power exercise (study 2); whether the lactate minimum power is influenced by the muscle groups used to elevate blood lactate concentration (study 3). Study 1: 32 subjects performed a lactate minimum test comprising a lactate elevation phase, recovery phase, and incremental phase (five 4 min stages); MLSS was subsequently determined. Study 2: 8 subjects performed a lactate minimum test and five 22 min constant power tests at the incremental phase exercise intensities. Study 3: 10 subjects performed two identical lactate minimum tests, except during the second test the lactate elevation phase comprised arm-cranking. Lactate minimum and MLSS powers demonstrated good agreement (mean bias+/-95% limits of agreement: 2+/-22 W). Rates of change of blood lactate concentration during each incremental phase stage and corresponding constant power test did not correlate. Lactate minimum power was lowered when arm-cranking was used during the lactate elevation phase (157+/-29 vs. 168+/-21 W; p<0.05). The lactate elevation phase modifies blood lactate concentration responses during the incremental phase, thus good agreement between lactate minimum and MLSS powers seems fortuitous.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record