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dc.contributor.authorBrown, Peter I.
dc.contributor.authorHughes, Michael G.
dc.contributor.authorTong, Richard J.
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-24T14:49:49Z
dc.date.available2013-05-24T14:49:49Z
dc.date.issued2008-05
dc.identifier.citationThe effect of warm-up on high-intensity, intermittent running using nonmotorized treadmill ergometry. 2008, 22 (3):801-8 J Strength Cond Resen
dc.identifier.issn1533-4287
dc.identifier.pmid18438237
dc.identifier.doi10.1519/JSC.0b013e31816a5775
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/292750
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to investigate the effect of previous warming on high-intensity intermittent running using nonmotorized treadmill ergometry. Ten male soccer players completed a repeated sprint test (10 x 6-second sprints with 34-second recovery) on a nonmotorized treadmill preceded by an active warm-up (10 minutes of running: 70% VO2max; mean core temperature (Tc) 37.8 +/- 0.2 degrees C), a passive warm-up (hot water submersion: 40.1 +/- 0.2 degrees C until Tc reached that of the active warm-up; 10 minutes +/- 23 seconds), or no warm-up (control). All warm-up conditions were followed by a 10-minute static recovery period with no stretching permitted. After the 10-minute rest period, Tc was higher before exercise in the passive trial (38.0 +/- 0.2 degrees C) compared to the active (37.7 +/- 0.4 degrees C) and control trials (37.2 +/- 0.2 degrees C; p < 0.05). There were no differences in pre-exercise oxygen consumption and blood lactate concentration; however, heart rate was greater in the active trial (p < 0.05). The peak mean 1-second maximum speed (MxSP) and group mean MxSP were not different in the active and passive trials (7.28 +/- 0.12 and 7.16 +/- 0.10 m x s(-1), respectively, and 7.07 +/- 0.33 and 7.02 +/- 0.24 m x s(-1), respectively; p > 0.05), although both were greater than the control. The percentage of decrement in performance fatigue was similar between all conditions (active, 3.4 +/- 1.3%; passive, 4.0 +/- 2.0%; and control, 3.7 +/- 2.4%). We conclude that there is no difference in high-intensity intermittent running performance when preceded by an active or passive warm-up when matched for post-warm-up Tc. However, repeated sprinting ability is significantly improved after both active and passive warm-ups compared to no warm-up.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of strength and conditioning research / National Strength & Conditioning Associationen
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshAnalysis of variance
dc.subject.meshBlood chemical analysis
dc.subject.meshCohort studies
dc.subject.meshErgometry
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMuscle contraction
dc.subject.meshMuscle fatigue
dc.subject.meshMuscle stretching exercises
dc.subject.meshOxygen consumption
dc.subject.meshPhysical education and training
dc.subject.meshPhysical endurance
dc.subject.meshProbability
dc.subject.meshRunning
dc.subject.meshSensitivity and specificity
dc.subject.meshSoccer
dc.titleThe effect of warm-up on high-intensity, intermittent running using nonmotorized treadmill ergometry.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derby, Department of Sport and Exerciseen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of strength and conditioning research / National Strength & Conditioning Associationen
html.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to investigate the effect of previous warming on high-intensity intermittent running using nonmotorized treadmill ergometry. Ten male soccer players completed a repeated sprint test (10 x 6-second sprints with 34-second recovery) on a nonmotorized treadmill preceded by an active warm-up (10 minutes of running: 70% VO2max; mean core temperature (Tc) 37.8 +/- 0.2 degrees C), a passive warm-up (hot water submersion: 40.1 +/- 0.2 degrees C until Tc reached that of the active warm-up; 10 minutes +/- 23 seconds), or no warm-up (control). All warm-up conditions were followed by a 10-minute static recovery period with no stretching permitted. After the 10-minute rest period, Tc was higher before exercise in the passive trial (38.0 +/- 0.2 degrees C) compared to the active (37.7 +/- 0.4 degrees C) and control trials (37.2 +/- 0.2 degrees C; p < 0.05). There were no differences in pre-exercise oxygen consumption and blood lactate concentration; however, heart rate was greater in the active trial (p < 0.05). The peak mean 1-second maximum speed (MxSP) and group mean MxSP were not different in the active and passive trials (7.28 +/- 0.12 and 7.16 +/- 0.10 m x s(-1), respectively, and 7.07 +/- 0.33 and 7.02 +/- 0.24 m x s(-1), respectively; p > 0.05), although both were greater than the control. The percentage of decrement in performance fatigue was similar between all conditions (active, 3.4 +/- 1.3%; passive, 4.0 +/- 2.0%; and control, 3.7 +/- 2.4%). We conclude that there is no difference in high-intensity intermittent running performance when preceded by an active or passive warm-up when matched for post-warm-up Tc. However, repeated sprinting ability is significantly improved after both active and passive warm-ups compared to no warm-up.


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