• A comparison of the performance of the Braden Q and the Glamorgan paediatric pressure ulcer risk assessment scales in general and intensive care paediatric and neonatal units.

      Willock, Jane; Habiballah, Laila; Long, Deborah; Palmer, Kelli; Anthony, Denis; University of Leeds; University of Oxford (Elsevier, 2016-03-15)
      Aims To compare the predictive ability of two risk assessment scales used in children. Background There are several risk assessment scales (RASs) employed in paediatric settings but most have been modified from adult scales such as the Braden Q whereas the Glamorgan was an example of a scale designed for children. Methods Using incidence data from 513 paediatric hospital admissions, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) was employed to compare the two scales. The area under the curve (AUC) was the outcome of interest. Results The two scales were similar in this population in terms of area under the curve. Neonatal and paediatric intensive care were similar in terms of AUC for both scales but in general paediatric wards the Braden Q may be superior in predicting risk. Conclusion Either scale could be used if the predictive ability was the outcome of interest. The scales appear to work well with neonatal, paediatric intensive care and general children’s wards. However the Glamorgan scale is probably preferred by childrens’ nurses as it is easy to use and designed for use in children. There is some suggestion that while the two scales are similar in intensive care, for general paediatrics the Braden Q may be the better scale.
    • Competencies and frameworks in interprofessional education: A comparative analysis

      Thistlethwaite, Jill; Forman, Dawn; Matthews, Lynda; Rogers, Gary; Steketee, Carole; Yassine, Tagrid; University of Derby (Wolters Kluwer, 2014-06)
      Health professionals need preparation and support to work in collaborative practice teams, a requirement brought about by an aging population and increases in chronic and complex diseases. Therefore, health professions education has seen the introduction of interprofessional education (IPE) competency frameworks to provide a common lens through which disciplines can understand, describe, and implement team-based practices. Whilst an admirable aim, often this has resulted in more confusion with the introduction of varying definitions about similar constructs, particularly in relation to what IPE actually means.The authors explore the nature of the terms competency and framework, while critically appraising the concept of competency frameworks and competency-based education. They distinguish between competencies for health professions that are profession specific, those that are generic, and those that may be achieved only through IPE. Four IPE frameworks are compared to consider their similarities and differences, which ultimately influence how IPE is implemented. They are the Interprofessional Capability Framework (United Kingdom), the National Interprofessional Competency Framework (Canada), the Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice (United States), and the Curtin University Interprofessional Capability Framework (Australia).The authors highlight the need for further discussion about establishing a common language, strengthening ways in which academic environments work with practice environments, and improving the assessment of interprofessional competencies and teamwork, including the development of assessment tools for collaborative practice. They also argue that for IPE frameworks to be genuinely useful, they need to augment existing curricula by emphasizing outcomes that might be attained only through interprofessional activity
    • Conflict management styles used by nurses in Jordan

      Al-Hamdan, Zaid; Norrie, Peter; Anthony, Denis; University of Leeds; Jordan University of Science and Technology, Jordan; De Montfort University, Leicester; Assistant Professor, Faculty of Nursing, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Jordan; Principal Lecturer and Senior Research Fellow, School of Nursing and Midwifery, De Montfort University, UK; Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, De Montfort University, UK (Sage, 2014-02-01)
      The aim of this study is to investigate the conflict management styles used by nurse managers in Jordan. There are five main styles which nurse managers use to deal with conflict. At present research into their utilisation is dominated by reports from Western countries. This research is the second to investigate their use by nurses in an Arab country and it illustrates both similarities and differences with this earlier work, allowing an initial profile to be constructed which may be applicable to the larger Arab world of health care. Cross sectional quantitative survey of nurse managers in Jordan. The Rahim Organisation Conflict Inventory (ROCI II) questionnaire was completed by 350 (83% response).The nurse managers were most likely to use an integrating style of conflict management, followed in rank order by comprising, obliging, dominating and avoiding. A tentative model of the styles which nurse managers in Arab countries use to manage conflict is proposed, which suggests that these managers are likely to provide stable workplaces.
    • Coping with joint pain in haemophilia

      Bailey, Jacqueline; Robinson, Georgina; Elander, James; London Metropolitan University; University of Surrey (British Psychological Society, 2005-05-01)
      Some Rolling Stones fans might think that joint bleeds in haemophilia are now more a case of ‘Its all over now’ than ‘Let it bleed’, for just as Mick Jagger’s song writing skills have changed since the 1960s and 70s, so has haemophilia care - treatment has improved dramatically over the last 30 years. Prophylactic clotting factor concentrates are now commonly used to prevent bleeding episodes among patients with severe haemophilia. Many patients, however, and especially those aged over 40, still live with chronic pain caused by arthritic complications of repeated bleeds into joints, leading to disability and reduced quality of life, and this aspect of the condition has not been widely recognised by health psychologists. Haemophilia patients' experiences of pain were the subject of a recent health psychology work placement and are the focus of an ongoing research project, collaborations with the UK Haemophilia Society, and this article summarises some aspects of that work.
    • Creating a coaching culture for managers in your organisation

      Forman, Dawn; Joyce, Mary; McMahon, Gladeana; Univeristy of Derby (Routledge, 2013)
      Creating a Coaching Culture for Managers in your Organisation is for managers leaders and coaches interested in extending the practice of coaching to achieve broader organisational outcomes. The book offers a practical approach on how to use coaching strategically to create a culture that supports change, builds leadership capacity, and achieves a high degree of alignment between the goals and aspirations of organisations, and their staff.
    • Creation of consensus recommendations for collaborative practice in the Malaysian psychiatric system: a modified Delphi study

      Shoesmith, Wendy; Chua, Sze Hung; Giridharan, Beena; Forman, Dawn; Fyfe, Sue; University Malaysia Sabah, Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia; Ministry of Health, Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia; Curtin University, Miri, Sarawak, Malaysia; University of Derby (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2020-06-19)
      There is strong evidence that collaborative practice in mental healthcare improves outcomes for patients. The concept of collaborative practice can include collaboration between healthcare workers of different professional backgrounds and collaboration with patients, families and communities. Most models of collaborative practice were developed in Western and high-income countries and are not easily translatable to settings which are culturally diverse and lower in resources. This project aimed to develop a set of recommendations to improve collaborative practice in Malaysia. In the first phase, qualitative research was conducted to better understand collaboration in a psychiatric hospital (previously published). In the second phase a local hospital level committee from the same hospital was created to act on the qualitative research and create a set of recommendations to improve collaborative practice at the hospital for the hospital. Some of these recommendations were implemented, where feasible and the outcomes discussed. These recommendations were then sent to a nationwide Delphi panel. These committees consisted of healthcare staff of various professions, patients and carers. The Delphi panel reached consensus after three rounds. The recommendations include ways to improve collaborative problem solving and decision making in the hospital, ways to improve the autonomy and relatedness of patients, carers and staff and ways to improve the levels of resources (e.g. skills training in staff, allowing people with lived experience of mental disorder to contribute). This study showed that the Delphi method is a feasible method of developing recommendations and guidelines in Malaysia and allowed a wider range of stakeholders to contribute than traditional methods of developing guidelines and recommendations.
    • Creative ageing: the social policy challenge.

      Hogan, Susan; Bradfield, E.; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-11-27)
      By 2071, the number of people over 65 could double to nearly 21.3 million, while the number of people aged 80 and over could more than treble to 9.5 million. Over the next 30 years, the number of people with dementia in the UK could double to 1.4 million. The current policy landscape marks a shift in thinking, away from ‘deficit’ models of later life towards a paradigm shift which ‘allows people to realise their potential for physical, social, and mental wellbeing throughout the life-course and to participate in society’ (World Health Organisation 2002, p. 3). Where previous models of later-life care have focused on supporting acute illness in older age, health-care systems are now forced to find ways to support individuals to take responsibility for their own health within their own communities. In 2008, the New Economics Foundation (NEF) was commissioned by the UK Government’s Foresight Project on Mental Capital and Wellbeing to review the interdisciplinary work of more than 400 researchers from across the world. The aim was to identify a set of evidencebased actions to improve wellbeing which individuals could be encouraged to build into their daily lives. This was distilled down to the Five Ways to Wellbeing, which is now a major driver of health policy in the UK. They are: connect, be active, take notice, keep learning, give This chapter will look at how different types of creativity in older age can meet the social policy recommendations embodied within the Five Ways to Wellbeing with specific detailed examples. The chapter will also relate this to the ongoing work on wellbeing, post-2008. Though some commentators have suggested this formulation is absurdly reductive, Five Ways to Wellbeing has had considerable success in being accessible to a wide-range of audiences and easy to embed in policy statements and to communicate to community-based organisational teams. Following a brief introduction to the British policy context, this chapter looks at ways in which Five Ways to Wellbeing can be realised through arts engagement providing detailed examples of arts practices that help sustain a creative older age.
    • Critical Pedagogy in Nursing: Transformational Approaches to Nurse Education in a Globalized World

      Dyson, Sue E. (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018)
      This book explores the academic processes of nursing education in times of uncertainty around healthcare policy and healthcare provision. Grounded in research examining current theory, policy and culture around nursing pedagogy, Sue Dyson addresses the core issues facing nurses today and argues that the current curriculum no longer reflects or serves contemporary nursing practice. In a time of scandals, cuts in funding and shortfalls in the profession, this book provides an answer to the growing call for a dynamic restructuring of nurse education. Offering a critical analysis of innovative pedagogies for nursing, the author proposes the notion of the co-created curriculum as a way forward for nurse education in the post-Francis era. This will be an invaluable read to academics, practitioners and policy makers in the fields of nursing, medicine, education, education policy and medical sociology.
    • Critical realism, agency and sickle cell: case studies of young people with sickle cell disorder at school

      Dyson, Simon M.; Atkin, Karl; Culley, Lorraine; Dyson, Sue E. (Taylor and Francis, 2013-07-26)
      Critical realism suggests that historical structures may operate as underlying generative mechanisms but not always be activated. This explains the near-absence of references to racism by black students with sickle cell disorder (SCD). Through case studies we show how latent mechanisms are not activated, and how social actors come to develop corporate agency. Themes discussed include: wider/historical racisms (carers' own experiences of overt racism at school); conscious actions (moving away from a school where racism was experienced); naming racism as an emergent strategy (when communal discussions enable multiple negative experiences to be framed and named as racism); and `passing` (not ostensibly experiencing racism if one is sufficiently light-skinned). Critical realism suggests how racism may be structuring the experiences of students with SCD at school even in the absence of specific accounts by young people.
    • Curriculum renewal for interprofessional education in health

      Dunston, Roger; Forman, Dawn; Rogers, Gary; Thistlethwaite, Jill; Yassine, Tagrid; Hager, Jane; Manidis, Maria; Rossiter, Chris; Curtin University (Office for Learning and Teaching Australia, 2014-01)
      In this preface we comment on four matters that we think bode well for the future of interprofessional education in Australia. First, there is a growing articulation, nationally and globally, as to the importance of interprofessional education and its contribution to the development of interprofessional and collaborative health practices. These practices are increasingly recognised as central to delivering effective, efficient, safe and sustainable health services. Second, there is a rapidly growing interest and institutional engagement with interprofessional education as part of pre-registration health professional education. This has changed substantially in recent years. Whilst beyond the scope of our current studies, the need for similar developments in continuing professional development (CPD) for health professionals was a consistent topic in our stakeholder consultations. Third, we observe what might be termed a threshold effect occurring in the area of interprofessional education. Projects that address matters relating to IPE are now far more numerous, visible and discussed in terms of their aggregate outcomes. The impact of this momentum is visible across the higher education sector. Finally, we believe that effective collaboration is a critical mediating process through which the rich resources of disciplinary knowledge and capability are joined to add value to existing health service provision. We trust the conceptual and practical contributions and resources presented and discussed in this report contribute to these developments.
    • Curriculum renewal in interprofessional education in health: establishing leadership and capacity

      Forman, Dawn; Dunston, Roger; Thistlethwaite, Jill; Moran, Monica Catherine; Steketee, Carole; University of Derby (Office for Learning and Teaching Australia, 2016)
      The Curriculum Renewal for Interprofessional Education in Health: ‘Establishing Leadership and Capacity’ (ELC) project builds from a number of Australian and global studies and reports that address a range of critical issues associated with the development of interprofessional education (IPE) and interprofessional practice (IPP) within Australia and globally2.
    • The determination of finger flexor critical force in rock climbers

      Giles, David; Chidley, Joe;; Taylor, Nicola; Torr, Ollie; Hadley, Josh; Randall, Tom; Fryer, Simon; University of Derby (Human Kinetics, 2019-04)
      Purpose: To determine if the mathematical model used for the estimation of critical force (CF) and the energy store component W’ is applicable to intermittent isometric muscle actions of the finger flexors of rock climbers, using a multi-session test. As a secondary aim, the agreement of estimates of CF and W’ from a single-session test were also determined. The CF was defined as the slope coefficient and W’ the intercept of the linear relationship between total “isometric work” (Wlim) and time to exhaustion (Tlim). Methods: Subjects performed three (separated by either 20 m or >24 h) tests to failure using intermittent isometric finger flexor contractions at 45, 60 and 80% of their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Results: Force plotted against Tlim displayed a hyperbolic relationship, correlation coefficients of the parameter estimates from the work–time CF model were consistently very high (R2 > 0.94). Climbers mean CF was 425.7 ± 82.8 N (41.0 ± 6.2% MVC) and W’ 30882 ± 11820 N·s. Good agreement was found between the single and multi-session protocol for CF (ICC(3,1) = 0.900, 95% Confidence Interval [CI95%] 0.616 – 0.979), but not for W’ (ICC(3,1) = 0.768, CI95% 0.190 – 0.949). Conclusions: The results demonstrated the sensitivity of a simple test for the determination of CF and W’, using equipment readily available in most climbing gyms. While further work is still necessary, the test of CF described is of value for understanding exercise tolerance and determine optimal training prescription to monitor improvements the performance of the finger flexors.
    • Developing an Australia wide approach to IPE leadership and sustainability

      Moran, Monica; Forman, Dawn; O’Keefe, Maree; Steketee, Carole; Rogers, Gary D.; Dunston, Roger; University of Western Australia, Geraldton, Australia; University of Derby; University of Adelaide, Australia; University of Notre Dame, Fremantle, Australia; et al. (Springer International Publishing, 2020-07-28)
      Australia is a country and a continent. Whilst health standards are ranked amongst the best in the world, its immense size and distributed population creates unique challenges for the delivery of integrated health and social care services.
    • Developing and maintaining leadership, resilience and sustainability in interprofessional collaboration

      Forman, Dawn; University of Derby (Springer International Publishing, 2020-07-28)
      Interprofessional collaboration has grown significantly in health care organisations, becoming a critical part of the way in which health and social care is delivered. It is now seen as an essential part of effective health care delivery. Health professionals can be assigned to designated teams due to the increasing complexity of health care delivery, or more commonly a number of professionals with different expertise work together in collaborations which can be configured over some distance (Thistlethwaite, Dunston, & Yassine in Journal of Interprofessional Care 32:745–751, 2019).
    • Development and evaluation of student transition writing mentoring

      Elander, James; Westrup, Rebecca; Caldwell, Teresa; Foxcroft, Angela; Norton, Lin; Crooks, Sarah; Wardley, Karen; University of Derby; Liverpool Hope University (Oxford Centre for Staff and Learning Development, 2011-09-01)
      Flying Start, an inter-institutional NTFS project, developed and evaluated programmes in which university students mentored A-level and other pre-university students in academic writing. Feedback showed that the pre-university mentees found the mentors easy to talk to and believed the programme would help them write better at university. Focus groups revealed that mentees would have liked better preparation for the programmes; that interpersonal mentor-mentee interactions affected both sets of students’ experiences; and that mentees valued working with mentors on the aspects of writing that were programme targets. Before-and-after measures showed limited changes in approaches to learning, no changes in understanding of the core criteria for university writing, but small improvements in quality of writing. The evaluation provides the basis for recommendations about wider use of pre-university interventions in academic writing, and about ways the approach could be adapted for different settings.
    • Development and preliminary evaluation of a new anatomically based prosthetic alignment method for below-knee prosthesis.

      Tafti, Nahid; Karimlou, Masoud; Mardani, Mohammad Ali; Jafarpisheh, Amir Salar; Aminian, Gholam Reza; Safari, Reza; University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences; Islamic Azad University; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2018-04-20)
      The objectives of current study were to a) assess similarities and relationships between anatomical landmark-based angles and distances of lower limbs in unilateral transtibial amputees and b) develop and evaluate a new anatomically based static prosthetic alignment method. First sub-study assessed the anthropometrical differences and relationships between the lower limbs in the photographs taken from amputees. Data were analysed via paired t-test and regression analysis. Results show no significant differences in frontal and transverse planes. In the sagittal plane, the anthropometric parameters of the amputated limb were significantly correlated to the corresponding variables of the sound limb. The results served as bases for the development of a new prosthetic alignment method. The method was evaluated on a single subject study. Prosthetic alignment carried out by an experienced prosthetist was compared with such alignment adjusted by an inexperienced prosthetist but with the use of the developed method. In sagittal and frontal planes, the socket angle was tuned with respect to the shin angle, and the position of the prosthetic foot was tuned in relation to the pelvic landmarks. Further study is needed to assess the proposed method on a larger sample of amputees and prosthetists.
    • Development of materials to support parents whose babies cry excessively: findings and health service implications.

      Long, Jaqui; Powell, Charlotte; Bamber, Deborah; Garratt, Rosemary; Brown, Jayne; Dyson, Sue E.; St James-Roberts, Ian (Cambridge University Press, 2018-01-10)
      Aim: To develop evidence-based materials which provide information and support for parents who are concerned about their baby's excessive crying. As well as meeting these parents' needs, the aim was to develop a package of materials suitable for use by the UK National Health Service (NHS). Background: Parents report that around 20% of 1-4 month-old infants in western countries cry excessively without apparent reason. Traditionally, research has focused on the crying and its causes. However, evidence is growing that how parents evaluate and respond to the crying needs to receive equal attention. This focus encompasses parental resources, vulnerabilities, wellbeing, and mental health. At present, the UK NHS lacks a set of routine provisions to support parents who are concerned about their baby's excessive crying. The rationales, methods and findings from a study developing materials for this purpose are reported. Method: Following a literature review, 20 parents whose babies previously cried excessively took part in focus groups or interviews. They provided reports on their experiences and the supports they would have liked when their baby was crying excessively. In addition, they identified their preferred delivery methods and devices for accessing information and rated four example support packages identified by the literature review. Findings: During the period their baby cried excessively, most parents visited a health service professional and most considered these direct contacts to have provided helpful information and support. Websites were similarly popular. Telephones and tablets were the preferred means of accessing online information. Groups to meet other parents were considered an important additional resource by all the parents. Three package elements - a Surviving Crying website, a printed version of the website, and a programme of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy-based support sessions delivered to parents by a qualified practitioner, were developed for further evaluation.
    • Development of NURSE education in Saudi Arabia, Jordan and Ghana: From undergraduate to doctoral programmes

      Anthony, Denis; Alosaimi, Dalyal; Dyson, Sue E.; Saleh, Mohammad; Korsah, Kwadwo; University of Derby; King Saud University, Saudi Arabia; University of Ghana, Ghana; University of Jordan, Jordan (Elseiver, 2020-08-18)
      Doctoral programmes in nursing have a long history in the US where traditional research based PhDs and more clinically based doctoral programmes are common. In the rest of the world PhDs are better accepted though professional doctorates with a thesis component are common in the UK. In countries with newly established or planned doctoral programmes in nursing the research PhD seems the degree of choice. Here we discuss developments in Jordan, Saudi Arabia and Ghana. This study used official documents, strategic plans, curriculum developments and other documentary evidence from Saudi Arabia, Jordan and Ghana. We compared doctoral programmes and development with other countries by reference to the literature. We offer the example of public health and non-communicable diseases in particular as one area where doctorally trained nurses applying international standards in collaboration internationally may be of benefit.
    • The Digital House of Care: information solutions for integrated care

      Muirhead, Andrew; Howard, Brenda; Ward, Derek; University of Derby (Emerald, 2016-10-17)
      Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of a digital tool in an English county striving towards a vision of integrated information that is used to underpin an increasingly integrated future of health and social care delivery. Design/methodology/approach – It discusses the policy context nationally, the origins and implementation of the initiative, the authors’ experiences and viewpoint highlighting key challenges and learning, as well as examples of new work undertaken. Findings – In all, 12 health and care organisations have participated in this project. The ability for local commissioners and providers of services to now understand “flow” both between and within services at a granular level is unique. Costs are modest, and the opportunities for refining and better targeting as well as validating services are significant, thus demonstrating a return on investment. Key learning includes how organisational development was equally as important as the implementation of innovative new software, that change management from grass roots to strategic leaders is vital, and that the whole system is greater than the sum of its otherwise in-silo parts. Practical implications – Data linkage initiatives, whether local, regional or national in scale, need to be programme managed. A robust governance and accountability framework must be in place to realise the benefits of such as a solution, and IT infrastructure is paramount. Social implications – Organisational development, collaborative as well as distributed leadership, and managing a change in culture towards health and care information is critical in order to create a supportive environment that fosters learning across organisational boundaries. Originality/value – This paper draws on the recent experience of achieving large-scale data integration across the boundaries of health and social care, to help plan and commission services more effectively. This rich, multi-agency intelligence has already begun to change the way in which the system considers service planning, and learning from this county’s approach may assist others considering similar initiatives.
    • Digital interventions to promote self-management in people with osteoarthritis: systematic review and meta-analysis - Study protocol

      Safari, Reza; Jackson, Jessica; Dhadda, Buk; Watkins, Merryl; Sheffield, David; Anthony, Denis; Ward, Derek; University of Derby; NHS Southern Derbyshire; Lincolnshire County Council (National Health Service (NHS), 2018-05-11)
      The proposed research is a systematic review and meta-analysis of available randomised controlled trials of digital interventions to promote self-management in people with osteoarthritis. The effects of self-management programs, on patient outcomes such as pain, disability, function and quality of life will be analysed in direct pairwise meta-analysis. The health service outcomes and cost effectiveness data will also be extracted if reported in the papers and will be synthesised narratively.