• Prevalence of pressure ulcers in long term care: A global review.

      Anthony, Denis; Alosoumi, Dalyal; Safari, Reza; University of Derby (Mark Allen Healthcare, 2019)
      To identify the prevalence and incidence of pressure ulcers in people with long term conditions resident in care homes or nursing homes . We followed the PRISMA guideline for systematic reviews however due to funding constraints we do not claim this review to be systematic but it is a narrative review informed by PRISMA. We searched Embase, Medline and CINHAL for observational studies reporting incidence or prevalence data. Data reported relevant head to toe examination of the pressure ulcer in residence of care or nursing homes. Internat and external validity of the included studies were assessed using the checklist devised by Hoy et al (2012). Seventeen studies met the inclusion criteria an included in the study. Some studies gave a full breakdown by grade, some only gave overall figures and some excluded grade I pressure ulcers. However within those constraints certain patterns are clear. Prevalence rates varied from 3.4% to 32.4% and large differences in prevalence in different countries was not explained by methodological differences. While some countries such as Germany, the Netherlands and the USA had robust data some countries such as the UK had none. Pressure ulcers are a common problem in long term care. However there are substantial differences between countries and many countries have no published data.
    • The prototype of a thermoregulatory system for measurement and control of temperature inside prosthetic socket

      Ghoseiri, Kamiar; Ghoseiri, K; Zheng, Y.P; Hing, L.T; Safari, Reza; Leung, A.K.L; University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences; Hong Kong Polytechnic University (SAGE, 2015-06-11)
      Thermal related problems with prostheses are common complaints of amputee people. This article aims to introduce a thermoregulatory technique as a potential solution for those problems in prostheses wearers. A smart thermoregulatory system was designed, manufactured, and installed on a phantom model of a prosthetic socket. It captured temperature data from 16 sensors positioned at the interface between the phantom model and a silicone liner and used their average for comparison with a defined set temperature to select required heating or cooling functions for thermal equilibrium. A thin layer of Aluminum was used to transfer temperature between thermal pump and different sites around the phantom model. The feasibility of this thermoregulatory technique was confirmed by its ability to provide thermal equilibrium. Further investigations to improve the design of thermoregulatory system are necessary including temperature transfer element and power consumption based on thermal capacity and thermal inertia of the residual limb. The smart thermoregulatory system by providing thermal equilibrium between two sides of a prosthetic silicone liner can control residual limb skin temperature and sweating. Consequently, it can improve quality of life in amputee people.
    • Reducing avoidable pressure ulcers.

      Anthony, Denis; HODGSON, Heather; HORNER, Joanna; University of Leeds (Wounds UK., 2017-04-24)
      Risk assessment scales for pressure ulcers have been in use for over 50 years but there is no evidence that such scales reduce pressure ulcer incidence. Pressure ulcer interventions have been shown to be effective, sometimes alongside risk assessment scales. Care bundles are an example of multifaceted approaches that have been successfully used in a variety of clinical areas including for pressure ulcers. Pressure ulcers were monitored before and after implementation of a new scheme based on an existing care bundle. Avoidable pressure ulcers were significantly reduced following implementation of the scheme.
    • Reducing health risk factors in workplaces of low and middle-income countries.

      Anthony, Denis; Dyson, Pamela A.; Lv, Jun; Thankappan, Kavumpurathu R.; Matthews, David R.; University of Leeds; Healthcare; University of Leeds; Leeds UK; Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology & Metabolism; University of Oxford; Oxford UK; School of Public Health; Peking University Health Science Center; Beijing China; Achutha Menon Centre for Health Science Studies; Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology; Trivandrum India; et al. (Wiley., 2015-03-19)
      Objective: To reduce risk factors in workplace settings in low- and middle-income countries. Design and Sample: Workplace interventions were utilized as part of the Community Interventions for Health program, a nonrandomized, controlled study undertaken in three communities in China, India, and Mexico. Exactly, 45 industrial, 82 health and 101 school workplace settings with a target population of 15,726. Two independent cross-sectional surveys of workers were conducted at baseline and follow-up, after 18–24 months of intervention activities. Measures: Culturally appropriate interventions to reduce tobacco use, increase physical activity, and improve dietary intake were delivered in the intervention areas. Results: Exactly, 12,136 adults completed surveys at baseline, and 9,786 at follow-up. In the intervention group, the prevalence of tobacco use reduced significantly in men (-6.0%, p < .001) and the proportion eating five portions of fruit and vegetables daily increased (+6.9%, p < .001) compared with the control group. There were no significant differences between the groups for changes in physical activity or prevalence of overweight. Conclusions: Workplace interventions improved risk factors in China, India, and Mexico.
    • Reported school experiences of young people living with sickle cell disorder in England.

      Dyson, Simon M.; Abuateya, Hala; Atkin, Karl; Culley, Lorraine; Dyson, Sue E.; Rowley, Dave (Wiley, 2010)
      A survey of 569 young people with sickle cell disorder (SCD) in England has found such pupils miss considerable periods of time from school, typically in short periods of two or three days. One in eight has school absences equating to government-defined ‘persistent absence’. Students with SCD report that they are not helped to catch up after these school absences. Half the children reported not being allowed to use the toilet when needed and not being allowed water in class; a third reported being made to take unsuitable exercise and being called lazy when tired. Children perceived both physical environment (temperature, school furniture) and social environment (being upset by teachers or other pupils) as triggers to episodes of their illness. Policy initiatives on school absences; preventive measures to ensure maintenance of good health; and measures to prevent perceived social attitudes precipitating ill health would also support children with other chronic illnesses at school.
    • Respect, trust, and the management of sickle cell disease pain in hospital: comparative analysis of concern-raising behaviors, preliminary model, and agenda for international collaborative research to inform practice

      Elander, James; Beach, Mary Catherine; Haywood, Carlton; University of Derby; John Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA (Taylor and Francis, 2011-07-28)
      Qualitative interview studies suggest that adult patients’ experiences of hospital treatment for sickle cell disease (SCD) pain reflect an absence of respect by providers for patients, and an absence or breakdown of trust. Systematic comparisons between treatment settings could help identify contextual influences on respect and trust. Quantitative comparison of concern-raising behaviors (pain treatment outcomes indicating breakdowns of trust) among adult SCD patients in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A., and London, U.K., followed by analysis of potential explanations for differences, including socio-cultural and behavioral factors, with a preliminary model of the processes leading to concern-raising behaviors. Rates of concern-raising behaviors were significantly higher in Baltimore than London. The model identifies respect and trust as key factors which could be targeted in efforts to improve the quality of SCD pain management in hospital. An agenda for international, interdisciplinary research to improve the treatment of SCD pain in hospital should include: comparative analyses between countries and treatment settings of factors that could influence respect and trust; research to test hypotheses derived from models about the roles of respect and trust in the treatment of pain; studies of the impact of healthcare structures and policy on patients’ experiences of care; research focusing on developmental and interpersonal processes related to respect and trust; applications of attribution and other social psychology theories; and development and evaluation of interventions to improve the hospital treatment of SCD pain by increasing respect and trust.
    • Return to practice: supporting diagnostic radiographers back into the workforce.

      Hyde, Emma; Errett, Sue; University of Derby (2017-06-12)
      The ‘Return to Practice in Diagnostic Radiography’ programme at one UK university provides a structured way for returnees to meet the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) return to practice requirements. The programme is designed to support returnees to re-establish clinical competency in a range of radiographic techniques and diagnostic imaging procedures within their scope of practice. The programme includes scheduled learning and teaching activities, simulation in the clinical skills suite and problem based scenarios. Guided independent study is utilised to support individual learning needs identified in a ‘gaps analysis’ exercise. Placement learning provides the opportunity for returnees to apply underpinning theory into current clinical practice, and demonstrate professional and radiographic skills. This poster shared the experience of successfully supporting the two cohorts of return to practice learners through the programme.
    • The role and value of medicines management work packages 1 & 2

      Giles, David; Lewis, Rachel; Ward, Derek; University of Derby (Southern Derbyshire County Council, 2017-07-28)
      Work Package 1 presents the findings and recommendations from the analysis of Southern Derbyshire’s Medicine Management “Work Log” SharePoint data set. The report provides an overview of the work done by the Medicine Management team. The current form and function of the SharePoint data set are also discussed. The analysis of the dataset (Annex Document) provide context for the recommendations presented, which are based on six case studies selected by Southern Derbyshire Medicines Management team. Work package 2 presents the findings and recommendations from our evaluation of the project to embed Clinical Pharmacists in Patient Facing roles within the ‘Belper Five’ group of practices. This element of the report continues to explore the value of medicines management from the viewpoint of the expanded role of the patient facing Clinical Pharmacists within a general practice setting.
    • Routledge international handbook of nurse education

      Dyson, Sue E.; McAllister, Margaret; University of Derby; Central Queensland University (Routledge, 2019-11-26)
      While vast numbers of nurses across the globe contribute in all areas of healthcare delivery from primary care to acute and long-term care in community settings, there are significant differences in how they are educated, as well as the precise nature of their practice. This comprehensive handbook provides a research-informed and international perspective on the critical issues in contemporary nurse education. As an applied discipline, nursing is implemented differently depending on the social, political and cultural climate in any given context. These factors impact on education, as much as on practice, and are reflected in debates around the value of accredited programmes, and on-the-job training, apprenticeship, undergraduate and postgraduate pathways into nursing. Engaging with these debates amongst others, the authors collected here discuss how, through careful design and delivery of nursing curricula, nurses can be prepared to understand complex care processes, complex healthcare technologies, complex patient needs and responses to therapeutic interventions, and complex organizations. The book discusses historical perspectives on how nurses should be educated; contemporary issues facing educators; teaching and learning strategies; the politics of nurse education; education for advanced nursing practice; global approaches; and educating for the future. Bringing together leading authorities from across the world to reflect on past, present and future approaches to nurse education and nursing pedagogy, this handbook provides a cutting-edge overview for all educators, researchers and policy-makers concerned with nurse education.
    • School ethos and variation in health experience of young people with sickle cell disorder at school.

      Dyson, Sue E.; Atkin, Karl; Culley, Lorraine; Demaine, Jack; Dyson, Simon M. (Radcliffe Publishing, 2012-05)
      Young people with serious chronic illnesses, such as sickle cell disorder, report high levels of negative experiences at school that have adverse effects on their health. Disclosure of sickle cell status appears to be unrelated to improved experiences, and alternative explanations for variable health experiences at school are required. This paper draws on a multi-methods study of young people with sickle cell disorder in England in an attempt to make sense of variable experiences unrelated to disease severity or to teacher/peer awareness of sickle cell disorder. School ethos refers to the manner in which schoolbased interactions combine to bring into effect school values, including the attitudes expected of young people, the attitudes expected of teachers, how young people relate to each other, how young people relate to staff, how the school relates to the community, and a holistic concern with the spiritual, moral, cultural and social development of the young person. It is proposed that these interactions and resulting values are a key to understanding the variable health experiences of young people with sickle cell disorder at school.
    • Shoulder muscle activity in sport climbing in naturally chosen and corrected shoulder positions

      Baláš, Jiří; Duchačová, Alena; Giles, David; Kotalíková, Kateřina; Pánek, David; Draper, Nick; Charles University; University of Derby; University of Cantebury (Bentham Open, 2017-05-31)
      Objective: The aim of the study was to determine electromyographic activity of the scapula stabilizing muscles in naturally chosen and corrected shoulder positions in typical static climbing postures. Methods: Six male participants undertook surface electromyography measurement in four climbing postures for two different shoulder positions. The activity of the lower, middle and upper trapezius, serratus anterior, pectoralis major, and sternocleidomastoid was recorded. Electromyographic activity was expressed as the percentage of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) for each muscle. Results: Climbing postures induced higher activation of middle and lower trapezius in corrected shoulder positions (35.3 ± 11.8 and 61.7 ± 15.4% MVC respectively) than in naturally chosen shoulder positions (18.4 ± 8.9 and 30.1 ± 13.8% MVC respectively). The highest activity of the middle and lower trapezius was found in postures with the arm in external rotation and 90° abduction and in an overhanging posture. Low activation was stated for the other muscles in both shoulder conditions. Conclusion: Results showed that climbers naturally elevate the shoulder during typical static postures. Corrected shoulder positions induce higher activation of the scapula stabilizing muscles than naturally chosen shoulder positions.
    • Sickle cell, habitual dys-positions and fragile dispositions: young people with sickle cell at school.

      Dyson, Simon M.; Atkin, Karl; Culley, Lorraine A.; Dyson, Sue E.; Evans, Hala (Wiley-Blackwell, 2011-03)
      The experiences of young people living with a sickle cell disorder in schools in England are reported through a thematic analysis of forty interviews, using Bourdieu’s notions of field, capital and habitus. Young people with sickle cell are found to be habitually dys-positioned between the demands of the clinic for health maintenance through self-care and the field of the school, with its emphases on routines, consistent attendance and contextual demands for active and passive pupil behaviour. The tactics or dispositions that young people living with sickle cell can then employ, during strategy and struggle at school, are therefore fragile: they work only contingently, transiently or have the unintended consequences of displacing other valued social relations. The dispositions of the young people with sickle cell are framed by other social struggles: innovations in school procedures merely address aspects of sickle cell in isolation and are not consolidated into comprehensive policies; mothers inform, liaise, negotiate and advocate in support of a child with sickle cell but with limited success. Reactions of teachers and peers to sickle cell have the enduring potential to drain the somatic, cultural and social capital of young people living with sickle cell.
    • Singing

      Irons, J. Yoon; Hancox, Grenville; University of Derby; Canterbury Christ Church University (Emerald Publishing Limited, 2021-03-18)
      We are 'hard-wired' to sing - singing has defined our evolution. Through singing we express our feelings, communicate and connect with others. We are all singers: singing is part of us and defines cultures worldwide. Singing also, importantly, makes us feel better: it is, undoubtedly, good for us. This book provides an important overview of current research showing the benefits of singing on our health and wellbeing. Case studies illustrate its power - for example, how singing helps hospitalised children and a man living with Parkinson's. The book also discusses potential barriers for singing and useful strategies needed to overcome them. An example of a community singing group is also demonstrated, alongside practical advice on facilitating community singing groups for health and wellbeing. The book will be valuable to professionals working in health and social care settings, to practitioners and educators interested in engaging in singing for health promotion, and individuals looking to find out more about the benefits and practicalities of singing.
    • Singing as an adjunct therapy for children and adults with cystic fibrosis.

      Irons, J. Yoon; Petocz, Peter; Kenny, Dianna Theadora; Chang, Anne B.; Alder Hey Children's NHS Foundation Trust (Cochrane Library, 2014-06-10)
      Background: Cystic fibrosis is a genetically inherited, life-threatening condition that affects major organs. The management of cystic fibrosis involves a multi-faceted daily treatment regimen that includes airway clearance techniques, pancreatic enzymes and other medications. Previous studies have found that compliance with this intensive treatment is poor, especially among adolescents. Because of both the nature and consequences of the illness and the relentless demands of the treatment, many individuals with cystic fibrosis have a poor quality of life. Anecdotal reports suggest that singing may provide both appropriate exercise for the whole respiratory system and a means of emotional expression which may enhance quality of life. Objectives: To evaluate the effects of singing as an adjunct therapy to standard treatment on the quality of life, morbidity, respiratory muscle strength and pulmonary function of children and adults with cystic fibrosis. Search methods: We searched the Group's Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Date of latest search: 31 March 2014. We also searched major allied complementary data bases, and clinical trial registers. Additionally, we handsearched relevant conference proceedings and journals. Date of latest search: 24 May 2012. Selection criteria: Randomised controlled trials in which singing (as an adjunct intervention) is compared with either a control intervention (for example, playing computer games or doing craft activities) or no singing in people with cystic fibrosis. Data collection and analysis: Results of searches were reviewed against pre-determined criteria for inclusion. Only one eligible trial was available for analysis. Main results: Since only one small study was included, no meta-analysis could be performed. The included study was a parallel, randomised controlled trial undertaken at two paediatric hospitals in Australia. The study evaluated the effects of a singing program on the quality of life and respiratory muscle strength of hospitalised children with cystic fibrosis (mean age 11.6 years, 35% male). While the singing group received eight individual singing sessions, the control group participated in preferred recreational activities, such as playing computer games or watching movies. This study was limited by a small sample size (51 participants) and a high drop-out rate (21%). There were no significant differences between the groups at either post-intervention or follow up; although by the end of treatment there were some within-group statistically significant increases for both singing and control groups in some of the domains of the quality of life questionnaire Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire-Revised (e.g. emotional, social and vitality domains). For the respiratory muscle strength indices, maximal expiratory pressure at follow up (six to eight weeks post-intervention) was higher in the singing group, mean difference 25.80 (95% confidence interval 5.94 to 45.66). There was no significant difference between groups for any of the other respiratory function parameters (maximal inspiratory pressure, spirometry) at either post-intervention or follow up. Authors' conclusions: There is insufficient evidence to determine the effects of singing on quality of life or on the respiratory parameters in people with cystic fibrosis. However, there is growing interest in non-medical treatments for cystic fibrosis and researchers may wish to investigate the impact of this inexpensive therapy on respiratory function and psychosocial well-being further in the future.
    • Singing as an adjunct therapy for children and adults with cystic fibrosis.

      Irons, J. Yoon; Petocz, Peter; Kenny, Dianna Theadora; Chang, Anne B.; Griffith University; South Bank Campus, Griffith University; Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre; 140 Grey Street Brisbane Australia QLD 4101; Macquarie University; Department of Statistics; Eastern Road Sydney NSW Australia 2109; University of Sydney; Behavioural and Social Sciences in Health, Faculty of Health Sciences; East St Lidcombe NSW Australia 1825; Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University; Child Health Division; PO Box 41096 Darwin Northern Territories Australia 0811 (Cochrane Library, 2016-09-15)
      People with cystic fibrosis are at risk of chest infections due to abnormally thick mucus in their airways. Airway clearance is therefore an important part of managing the condition. Increasing anecdotal reports suggest that singing may support lung function and enhance quality of life in people with cystic fibrosis. We searched for trials using the standard search methods of the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group, and conducted extensive searches in other relevant databases and publications. This is an update of a previously published review.Participants from both the singing and recreation groups reported some improvement in quality of life measurements. Participants in the singing group demonstrated a greater increase in maximal expiratory pressure (a substitute measure of respiratory muscle strength test), while participants in the recreation group did not show improvement. No adverse events were reported. There is currently not enough evidence to assess the effect of singing on clinical outcomes in people with cystic fibrosis. Future studies using robust methods are needed to assess the possible effects of singing for people with cystic fibrosis
    • Singing as an adjunct therapy for children and adults with cystic fibrosis.

      Irons, J. Yoon; Petocz, Peter; Kenny, Dianna T; Chang, Ann B.; University of Derby (2019-07-12)
      Cystic fibrosis is a genetically inherited, life‐threatening condition that affects major organs. The management of cystic fibrosis involves a multi‐faceted daily treatment regimen that includes airway clearance techniques, pancreatic enzymes and other medications. Previous studies have found that compliance with this intensive treatment is poor, especially among adolescents. Because of both the nature and consequences of the illness and the relentless demands of the treatment, many individuals with cystic fibrosis have a poor quality of life. Anecdotal reports suggest that singing may provide both appropriate exercise for the whole respiratory system and a means of emotional expression which may enhance quality of life. This is an update of a previously published review. To evaluate the effects of singing as an adjunct therapy to standard treatment on the quality of life, morbidity, respiratory muscle strength and pulmonary function of children and adults with cystic fibrosis. We searched the Group's Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Date of latest search: 07 January 2019. We also searched major allied complementary data bases, and clinical trial registers. Additionally, we hand searched relevant conference proceedings and journals. Date of latest search: 28 March 2019. Randomised controlled trials in which singing (as an adjunct intervention) is compared with either a control intervention (for example, playing computer games or doing craft activities) or no singing in people with cystic fibrosis. Results of searches were reviewed against pre‐determined criteria for inclusion. Only one eligible trial was available for analysis. Since only one small study (n = 40) was included, no meta‐analysis could be performed. The included randomised controlled study was of parallel design and undertaken at two paediatric hospitals in Australia. The study evaluated the effects of a singing program on the quality of life and respiratory muscle strength of hospitalised children with cystic fibrosis (mean age 11.6 years, 35% male). While the singing group received eight individual singing sessions, the control group participated in preferred recreational activities, such as playing computer games or watching movies. This study was limited by a small sample size (51 participants) and a high drop‐out rate (21%). There were no differences between the groups at either post‐intervention or follow‐up; although by the end of treatment there were some improvements in some of the domains of the quality of life questionnaire Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire‐Revised (e.g. emotional, social and vitality domains) for both singing and control groups. For the respiratory muscle strength indices, maximal expiratory pressure at follow‐up (six to eight weeks post‐intervention) was higher in the singing group, mean difference 25.80 (95% confidence interval 5.94 to 45.66). There was no difference between groups for any of the other respiratory function parameters (maximal inspiratory pressure, spirometry) at either post‐intervention or follow‐up. No adverse effects were observed in the singing group; adverse events for the control group were not reported in the paper. There is insufficient evidence to determine the effects of singing on quality of life or on the respiratory parameters in people with cystic fibrosis. However, there is growing interest in non‐medical treatments for cystic fibrosis and researchers may wish to investigate the impact of this inexpensive therapy on respiratory function and psychosocial well‐being further in the future.
    • Singing for people with Parkinson's disease

      Irons, J. Yoon; coren, Esther; Young, Megan K; Stewart, Donald E; Gschwandtner, Manfred; Mellick, George D; Health and Social Care Research Centre, University of Derby; Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre, Griffith University, Australia (Cochrane, 2019-02-26)
      To compare the efficacy and effectiveness of singing interventions with non‐singing intervention or usual care on QoL, wellbeing, and speech and communication among people with PD. We will assess the QoL and the physical, psychological, and social health and wellbeing of people with PD who receive a singing intervention, compared to non‐singing intervention or usual care.
    • Social media: blurred lines between personal and professional behaviour

      Jackson, Jessica; University of Derby (Medical Education Solutions, 2019-04-17)
      It is now over twenty years since the birth of social media and, according to Statista, the number of people engaged in these types of online networking platforms has reached over 39 million in the UK alone. These users include a generation who have grown up with such fast social interactions in a virtual world of posts for ‘likes’, ‘friends’ and ‘followers’. These young adults’ desire to engage in social media is often intertwined with their everyday lives.
    • Socket interface pressure and amputee reported outcomes for comfortable and uncomfortable conditions of patellar tendon bearing socket: a pilot study

      Safari, Reza; Tafti, Nahid; Aminian, Gholamreza; University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences (Taylor & Francis, 2015-03-11)
      The objectives of the current study were to compare intra-socket pressure differences between comfortable and uncomfortable socket conditions, and the usefulness of subject perception of satisfaction, activity limitations, and socket comfort in distinguishing between these two socket conditions. Five unilateral trans-tibial amputees took part in the study. They answered the Socket Comfort Score (SCS) and Trinity Amputation and Prosthetic Experience Scale (TAPES) questionnaires before the interface pressure (in standing and walking) was measured for the uncomfortable socket condition at five regions of the residual limb. Participants were then provided with a comfortable socket and wore it for two weeks. Participants who were satisfied with the socket fit after two weeks repeated the SCS and TAPES questionnaires and interface pressure measurements. The differences between the test results of the two conditions were not statistically significant, except for the interface pressure at the popliteal region during the early stance phase, TAPES socket fit subscale, and the SCS. Due to large variability of the data and the lack of statistical significance, no firm conclusion can be made on the possible relationship between the interface pressure values and the patient-reported outcomes of the two socket conditions. A larger sample size and longer acclimation period are required to locate significant differences.
    • Songs for health education and promotion: a systematic review with recommendations

      Sheffield, David; Irons, J. Yoon; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2021-09-06)
      We aimed to assess evidence of the effectiveness of song-based public health programmes and to examine the analyses of song lyrics to learn what their key qualities for public health promotion are. A systematic search was employed to identify empirical studies that examined song interventions for public health education and promotion. We searched the following databases: MEDLINE, PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO and AMED. We also backwards searched references of all relevant studies. Of the 137 studies identified, ten studies were included: four were quantitative and six were qualitative. The qualities of the included studies were assessed to be fair or good. The studies were from developing/low-income countries, South Africa and the United States, involving children and adults. Through a narrative data synthesis, three themes were identified; song-based programmes increased public health knowledge and changed behaviours. Additionally, developing songs for public health promotion involved consultations with local people utilising culturally and socially relevant genres or songs. Although the current evidence is limited by the small number of available studies and their heterogeneity, there is evidence that songs may be an effective method to deliver public health messages that result in improved education and changes in behaviour. Several advantages of using songs as public health strategies were identified that included their social and cultural relevance, ubiquity, low cost and enjoyment. Given these advantages, further research with the robust methodology is required to assess the benefits of songs using quantifiable outcomes along with evaluation of processes. We recommend that public health professionals, stakeholders and communities utilise songs as public health strategies.