• Values and ethics in CBT

      Kingdon, David; Maguire, Nick; Stalmeisters, Dzintra; Townend, Michael; University of Derby (Sage, 2017-03-17)
      This book covers the values and ethics in the field of CBT.
    • Ventilatory muscle strength, diaphragm thickness and pulmonary function in world-class powerlifters.

      Brown, Peter I.; Venables, Heather; Liu, Hymsuen; de Witt, Julie T.; Brown, Michelle R.; Faghy, Mark; University of Derby (Springer, 2013)
      Resistance training activates the ventilatory muscles providing a stimulus similar to ventilatory muscle training. We examined the effects of elite powerlifting training upon ventilatory muscle strength, pulmonary function and diaphragm thickness in world-class powerlifters (POWER) and a control group (CON) with no history of endurance or resistance training, matched for age, height and body mass.
    • What changes in the transition to learning at university?

      Elander, James; Foster, Ed; Norton, Lin; Foxcroft, Angela; University of Derby; Nottingham Trent University; Liverpool Hope University (Oxford Centre for Staff and Learning Development, 2010-09-01)
      This paper reviews evidence about factors affecting student transitions to learning at university. We first review theoretical models of student transitions, and consider their different emphases and end-points. We then examine evidence about academic factors (eg approaches to learning and beliefs about knowledge), social factors (eg engagement and integration) and pedagogic factors (eg teaching methods) as potential influences on student learning transitions. We then attempt a synthesis of the findings and theory, and propose a transitions model in which quality of learning is the key central factor.
    • Which behavioural and exercise interventions targeting fatigue show the most promise in multiple sclerosis? A systematic review with narrative synthesis and meta-analysis

      Moss-Moris, R; Harrison, A.M; Safari, Reza; Norton, S; van der Linden, M.L; Picariello, F; Thomas, S; White, C; Mercer, T; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2019-08-28)
      Fatigue is a common and highly debilitating symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS). This meta-analytic systematic review with detailed narrative synthesis examined randomised-controlled (RCTs) and controlled trials of behavioural and exercise interventions targeting fatigue in adults with MS to assess which treatments offer the most promise in reducing fatigue severity/impact. Medline, EMBASE and PsycInfo electronic databases, amongst others, were searched through to August 2018. Thirty-four trials (12 exercise, 16 behavioural and 6 combined; n = 2,434 participants) met inclusion criteria. Data from 31 studies (n = 1,991 participants) contributed to the meta-analysis. Risk of bias (using the Cochrane tool) and study quality (GRADE) were assessed. The pooled (SMD) end-of-treatment effects on self-reported fatigue were: exercise interventions (n = 13) -.84 (95% CI -1.20 to -.47); behavioural interventions (n = 16) -.37 (95% CI -.53 to -.22); combined interventions (n = 5) -.16 (95% CI: -.36 to .04). Heterogeneity was high overall. Study quality was very low for exercise interventions and moderate for behavioural and combined interventions. Considering health care professional time, subgroup results suggest web-based cognitive behavioural therapy for fatigue, balance and/or multicomponent exercise interventions may be the cost-efficient therapies. These need testing in large RCTs with long-term follow-up to help define an implementable fatigue management pathway in MS.
    • Which exercise and behavioural interventions show most promise for treating fatigue in multiple sclerosis? A network meta-analysis

      Harrison, Anthony M; Safari, Reza; Mercer, Tom; Picariello, Federica; van der Linden, Marietta L; White, Claire; Moss-Morris, Rona; Norton, Sam; University of Derby (SAGE Publications, 2021-04-20)
      Fatigue is a common, debilitating symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS) without a current standardised treatment. The aim of this systematic review with network meta-analyses was to estimate the relative effectiveness of both fatigue-targeted and non-targeted exercise, behavioural and combined (behavioural and exercise) interventions. Nine electronic databases up to August 2018 were searched, and 113 trials (n = 6909) were included: 34 were fatigue-targeted and 79 non-fatigue-targeted trials. Intervention characteristics were extracted using the Template for Intervention Description and Replication guidelines. Certainty of evidence was assessed using GRADE. Pairwise meta-analyses showed that exercise interventions demonstrated moderate to large effects across subtypes regardless of treatment target, with the largest effect for balance exercise (SMD = 0.84). Cognitive behavioural therapies (CBTs) showed moderate to large effects (SMD = 0.60), with fatigue-targeted treatments showing larger effects than those targeting distress. Network meta-analysis showed that balance exercise performed significantly better compared to other exercise and behavioural intervention subtypes, except CBT. CBT was estimated to be superior to energy conservation and other behavioural interventions. Combined exercise also had a moderate to large effect. Treatment recommendations for balance and combined exercise are tentative as the certainty of the evidence was moderate. The certainty of the evidence for CBT was high.
    • Why do student nurses want to be nurses?

      Holt, Paula; Perkinton, Louise; Davies, Fiona; University of Derby (EMAP, 2014-01-01)
      Nursing became an all graduate entry profession in September 2013; this move and the publication of the Francis report have brought the debate around nurse education and nurses' capacity to care into sharper focus. There is much debate over what makes a good nurse and whether graduate nurses lack care and compassion.
    • Work based assessment of teamwork: an interprofessional approach.

      Thistlethwaite, Jill; Forman, Dawn; Dunston, Roger; Moran, Monica Catherine; University of Derby (Office for Learning and Teaching Australia, 2015)
      This report Work-based assessment of teamwork: an interprofessional approach describes the Office for Learning and Teaching (OLT) funded project of the same name. It focuses on the rationale for, the development of and the piloting of a tool for observing and giving feedback on an individual student’s behavior in an interprofessional team based activity. The study was conducted during 2012–2014 with a project team initially led by the University of Queensland, and included team members from five Australian universities in three states (University of Queensland, University of Technology Sydney, The University of Sydney, Central Queensland University and Curtin University), as well as from the UK (University of Derby) and Canada (University of British Columbia).
    • ‘Youth Working’ youth workers: Filling the student support void

      Howell, T.J.; University of Derby (TAG, 2018-06-28)
      Initial findings from a replication of the the Krause and Coates (2008) study to examine the seven scales of student engagement. Recruitment to undergraduate youth work programmes are at risk, with programmes closing and many of those left struggling with unsustainably low numbers. However, numbers of younger applicants is growing. They are acquiring suitable experience from a range of sources, including the NCS model of recruiting from within, leaves school and college leavers with sufficient youth work experience to start a programme, albeit with limited life experience. Furthermore, there has been a spike of under graduate students who want to purse a career in youth work, after positive experiences of receiving youth work interventions, compounded by increasing numbers of applicants with support needs, including learning difficulties and a wide spectrum of mental health needs. Mature applicants still apply wihtout formal qualifications, and all students have to unlearn their experiences of schooling to maximise the transformational potential of undergraduate yoth work study. This session will explore the seven scales of engagement, loosely transition; peer to peer support; academic engagement; on line engagement; student to staff relationships and beyond class / social engagement. These were explored through the constant comparative method of qualitative analysis to explore the difference between the experience of the first year students , comparing those who identify as with support needs and those who do not after the first half of their first year of study. There are implications for living the values of the National Occupational Standard in the delivery of undergraduate programmes. There are implications for designing induction activities across the year, and qualitative feedback on a first year residential. Crucially there are implications for sustainable workloads of academics with significant time pressure to deliver teaching and learning and generating REF-able research. Join this session and hear the initial findings from this small-scale qualitative study, and work through the challenges nationally navigating the socially just commitment to social mobility, the range of support needs presenting at HEIs nationwide and propose how to generate best practice while remaining value driven and committed gatekeepers to the professional qualification. Is it acceptable to recruit students with limited resilience yet potential and maintain standards? How do we effectively promote engagement for first years? What are the implications for recruitment, programme delivery and workload planning?