• "I don’t want to hold your hand": Can Covid-19 public health messages delivered through songs?

      Sheffield, David; Irons, J Yoon; University of Derby (The British Psychological Society, 2020-10-28)
      In response to the outbreak of Covid-19, governments around the world have published their guidelines including rigorous hand washing, respiratory etiquette, social distancing and restrictions in movements and gatherings (European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, 2020). Songs have been used to share key advice since the start of the outbreak in many countries (Hui, 2020). In the UK, the first advice proffered concerned rigorous hand washing.
    • 'I felt like I was doing something wrong': A qualitative exploration of mothers' experiences of breastfeeding

      Jackson, Jessica; Hallam, Jenny; University of Derby (MAG, 2019-04-18)
      Despite its multiple health benefits, rates of breastfeeding to 2 years and beyond remain low in the UK. This qualitative study explored the experiences of support provided by health professionals to mothers breastfeeding beyond infancy. A key finding of the study was that health services are effective at supporting breastfeeding in the postnatal period, but that beyond the 1-year review the focus shifts to rapid weaning. A new approach to support breastfeeding continuation alongside the introduction of complementary foods is needed in line with professional guidance and recommendations. As critical reflective practitioners, health visitors are ideally placed to support and educate women about the wider social complexities of breastfeeding. However, health service commissioners need to recognise the importance of investment in the profession to enable health visitors to use their skills fully.
    • Increased knowledge of the effects of smoking and second-hand smoke encourages smoke-free homes.

      Fenton, Brenda; Thankappan, Kavumpurathu Raman; Champagne, Beatriz; Lv, Jun; Anthony, Denis; University of Leeds; Director, Community-based Research and Evaluation, MATRIX Public Health Solutions Inc., USA; Professor, Achutha Menon Centre for Health Science Studies, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, India; Executive Director, InterAmerican Heart Foundation, USA; Associate Professor, Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University Health Science Center, China; et al. (Sage, 2014-04-15)
      Objective: To establish the drivers for smoke-free homes among current daily smokers. Design: A cross-sectional study employing interviews (adults) and self-completed surveys (schoolchildren). Sample: Children aged 12 and 14 in schools in four cities in China, India, Mexico and England.Adults in the community. Measurements: Knowledge, attitude, beliefs and behaviour relevant to second-hand smoke in home. Intervention: None. Results: A total of 8994 adults and 14,756 children were surveyed. Knowledge of some of the effects of tobacco is high, but other effects are poorly understood in all cities.
    • Inscribed on the body: gender and difference in the arts therapies

      Hogan, Susan; University of Derby (Routledge, 2019-07-01)
      Gender and Difference in the Arts Therapies: Inscribed on the Body offers worldwide perspectives on gender in arts therapies practice and provides understandings of gender and arts therapies in a variety of global contexts. Bringing together leading researchers and lesser-known voices, it contains an eclectic mix of viewpoints, and includes detailed case studies of arts therapies practice in an array of social settings and with different populations. In addition to themes of gender identification, body politics and gender fluidity, this title discusses gender and arts therapies across the life-course, encompassing in its scope, art, music, dance and dramatic play therapy. Gender and Difference in the Arts Therapies demonstrates clinical applications of the arts therapies in relation to gender, along with ideas about best practice. It will be of great interest to academics and practitioners in the field of arts therapies globally.
    • An integrative systematic review of creative arts interventions for older informal caregivers of people with neurological conditions.

      Irons, J Yoon; Garip, Gulcan; Cross, Ainslea J; Sheffield, David; Bird, Jamie; University of Derby (PloS, 2020-12-07)
      We aimed to assess and synthesise the current state of quantitative and qualitative research concerning creative arts interventions for older informal caregivers of people with neurological conditions. A systematic search was employed to identify studies that examined creative arts interventions for older informal caregivers, which were synthesised in this integrative review. We searched the following databases: MEDLINE, PubMed, EBSCO, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, Scopus, Web of Science, and Google Scholar. We also backwards searched references of all relevant studies and inspected trials registers. Of the 516 studies identified, 17 were included: one was quantitative, nine were qualitative and seven used mixed methods. All included quantitative studies were pilot or feasibility studies employing pre- and post-test design with small sample sizes. Studies varied in relation to the type of creative intervention and evaluation methods, which precluded meta-analysis. Large effect sizes were detected in wellbeing measures following singing and art interventions. The qualitative synthesis highlighted that interventions created space for caregivers to make sense of, accept and adapt to their identity as a caregiver. Personal developments, such as learning new skills, were viewed positively by caregivers as well as welcoming the opportunity to gain cognitive and behavioural skills, and having opportunities to unload emotions in a safe space were important to caregivers. Group creative interventions were particularly helpful in creating social connections with their care-recipients and other caregivers. The current review revealed all creative interventions focused on caregivers of people living with dementia; subsequently, this identified gaps in the evidence of creative interventions for informal caregivers of other neurological conditions. There are encouraging preliminary data on music and art interventions, however, little data exists on other art forms, e.g., drama, dance. Creative interventions may appeal to many caregivers, offering a range of psycho-social benefits. The findings of the current review open the way for future research to develop appropriate and creative arts programmes and to test their efficacy with robust tools.
    • Interprofessional education for first year psychology students: career plans, perceived relevance and attitudes

      Roberts, Lynne D.; Forman, Dawn; University of Derby (Taylor Francis, 2014-10-08)
      Undergraduate psychology students have been largely excluded from interprofessional education (IPE) initiatives. In contrast to many health professions, undergraduate psychology students do not engage in work placements as part of their degree, and many enter careers outside the health care context. However, the collaborative skills gained through an IPE experience may well be beneficial to students who work in this wider context. This research examines whether undergraduate psychology students’ views of IPE vary according to their planned career directions, and if so, whether the perceived relevance of IPE mediates the relationships. A sample of 188 Australian university undergraduate psychology students completed an online questionnaire following completion of a first-year IPE health sciences program. Path analysis indicated that psychology students’ attitudes towards IPE are associated with both professional identification and practitioner orientation, fully mediated through the perceived relevance of IPE to future career and study plans. Stronger professional identification and practitioner orientation were associated with greater perceived relevance and more positive and less negative attitudes towards IPE. Placing a stronger emphasis on the generalizability of IP skills taught may increase students’ awareness of the relevance outside of the health context, reducing disengagement of students planning alternative careers.
    • Interprofessional health education in Australia: Three research projects informing curriculum renewal and development

      Steketee, Carole; Forman, Dawn; Dunston, Roger; Yassine, Tagrid; Matthews, Lynda; Saunders, Rosemary; Nicol, Pam; Alliex, Selma; University of Derby; Curtin University (Elsevier, 2014-05)
      Purpose This paper reports on three interrelated Australian studies that provide a nationally coherent and evidence-informed approach to interprofessional education (IPE). Based on findings from previous studies that IPE tends to be marginalized in mainstream health curriculum, the three studies aspired to produce a range of resources that would guide the sustainable implementation of IPE across the Australian higher education sector. Method Nine national universities, two peak industry bodies and a non-government organization constituted the study team. Data were gathered via a mixture of stakeholder consultations, surveys and interviews and analyzed using quantitative and qualitative methods. Results & Conclusion An important outcome was a curriculum renewal framework which has been used to explore the implications of the study's findings on Australian nursing. While the findings are pertinent to all health professions, nursing is well placed to take a leading role in establishing IPE as a central element of health professional education.
    • Introducing the individual teamwork observation and feedback tool (iTOFT): Development and description of a new interprofessional teamwork measure

      Thistlethwaite, Jill; Dallest, Kathy; Moran, Monica Catherine; Dunston, Roger; Roberts, Chris; Eley, Diann; Bogossian, Fiona; Forman, Dawn; Bainbridge, Lesley; Drynan, Donna; et al. (Taylor and Francis, 2016-06-08)
      The individual Teamwork Observation and Feedback Tool (iTOFT) was devised by a consortium of seven universities in recognition of the need for a means of observing and giving feedback to individual learners undertaking an interprofessional teamwork task. It was developed through a literature review of the existing teamwork assessment tools, a discussion of accreditation standards for the health professions, Delphi consultation and field-testing with an emphasis on its feasibility and acceptability for formative assessment. There are two versions: the Basic tool is for use with students who have little clinical teamwork experience and lists 11 observable behaviours under two headings: ‘shared decision making’ and ‘working in a team’. The Advanced version is for senior students and junior health professionals and has 10 observable behaviours under four headings: ‘shared decision making’, ‘working in a team’, ‘leadership’, and ‘patient safety’. Both versions include a comprehensive scale and item descriptors. Further testing is required to focus on its validity and educational impact.
    • Is ultrasound screening for vasa praevia clinically justified and a financially viable screening test? A literature review.

      Coleman, Gillian; Venables, Heather; University of Derby; College of Health and Social Care, University of Derby, Derby, UK; College of Health and Social Care, University of Derby, Derby, UK (Sage, 2018-02-01)
      Vasa praevia is an obstetric complication currently not screened for within the United Kingdom, which if undetected prenatally can lead to fetal death when the membranes rupture. Internationally, guidelines are available providing guidance on the best screening policy and management pathways. However, the UK National Screening Committee and Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists do not support screening due to a lack of evidence. Recent studies explore the ability of ultrasound to detect vasa praevia prenatally in both the general and high-risk populations. Whilst there is no consensus on the ‘best’ screening strategy, the majority of authors note that targeted screening of the high-risk population is the most achievable and cost-effective strategy. Although not infallible, a standard screening protocol could identify the majority of cases in the high-risk group. Introduction of a screening strategy would affect training needs of professionals within the UK and would have implications on the need to produce guidelines on management and quality assurance. Further research is also needed to define a relevant high-risk population and explore how this would impact on service provision. This review explores the current evidence base for systematic screening and the implications for service.
    • Issues, applications and outcomes in interprofessional education

      Forman, Dawn; University of Derby (MedKnow Publications, 2014-04)
      In this issue, we are very pleased to present six articles, each of which has a strong interprofessional theme and which, we believe, collectively provide a flavor of the diversity of interprofessional community-oriented education, practice and research activity occurring internationally.
    • ‘It’s quite a taboo subject’: an investigation of mother’s experiences of breastfeeding beyond infancy and the challenges they face

      Jackson, Jessica; Hallam, Jenny; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2021-06-10)
      Current recommendations state that women should breastfeed their child up to 2 years and beyond. However, the UK has one of the lowest breastfeeding rates in the world. This could in part be explained by the stigma mothers face when breastfeeding an older child. This research aims to provide a detailed understanding of what motivates women to continue breastfeeding beyond infancy and the barriers they face to (i) add to existing research literature which has examined this area and (ii) support and normalize this practice. Semi-structured interviews were conducted between April and June 2018 with 24 women who had breastfed at least one child past 12 months. A theory-driven thematic analysis identified themes that ran through the interviews centering on the benefits of continued breastfeeding, the stigma mothers faced when breastfeeding past infancy and the challenges of returning to work. The women felt that continued breastfeeding enabled them to play a central role in their child’s health and develop an attachment led parental style but faced social and cultural stigma due to a lack of public awareness of current breastfeeding recommendations. Interventions which raise awareness of breastfeeding beyond infancy are needed to normalize this practice in the UK.
    • Leadership and collaboration: Further developments for interprofessional education

      Forman, Dawn; Jones, Marion; Thistlethwaite, Jill; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015)
      Leadership and Collaboration provides international examples of how leadership of interprofessional education and practice has developed in various countries and examines how interprofessional education and collaborative practice can make a difference to the care of the patient, client and community.
    • Leadership development for interprofessional education and collaborative practice

      Forman, Dawn; Jones, Marion; Thistlethwaite, Jill; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014)
      Leadership Development of Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice is an edited compilation of chapters written by international medical and health professional experts. The book provides historical and current perspectives on leadership in healthcare.
    • Leading research and evaluation in interprofessional education and collaborative practice

      Forman, Dawn; Jones, Marion; Thistlethwaite, Jill; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016)
      Expanding upon Leadership Development for Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice and Leadership and Collaboration, the third installment to this original and innovative collection of books considers a variety of research models and theories. Emphasizing research and evaluation in leadership aspects, Leading Research and Evaluation in Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice
    • Learning and change within person-centred therapy: Views of expert therapists

      Renger, Sue; Macaskill, Ann; Naylor, Bill; Sheffield Hallam University; University of Derby (Wiley, 2020-01-12)
      Traditionally in Person-centred Therapy (PCT) clients are counselled for as long as required. It is a non-directive process. Recently, financial constraints have introduced time limits for therapy in health care, so it seemed appropriate to revisit the practice of PCT in the current UK context. The aim was to explore the concepts of learning and change within PCT and to consider whether learning is facilitated. Five experienced person-centred therapists, who were involved in educating therapists, participated in semi-structured interviews. Questions explored their views on learning and change in therapy, whether learning processes can be facilitated in PCT - both philosophically and practically, and the outcomes of PCT. Therapists were not specifically asked about time pressure but rather it was left to see if it emerged as an issue. Ten major themes emerged; learning and change, goals, learning process, PCT process, issues on non-directivity, questioning, outcomes, assessment and diagnosis, and other methods used. The issue of time pressure permeated many of these themes. Views were often contradictory reflecting the inconclusive views in the literature, particularly in relation to how clients learn and the relationship between change and learning.
    • Local authorities and the education of young people with sickle cell disorders in England.

      Dyson, Simon M.; Abuateya, Hala; Atkin, Karl; Culley, Lorraine A.; Dyson, Sue E.; Rowley, David T. (Routledge, 2008)
      The successful inclusion of minority ethnic pupils with sickle cell disorders (SCD) raises a number of challenges for educational systems. In England, local education authorities were important drivers for innovative responses to complex needs and the former Inner London Education Authority produced guidance in 1989 on SCD in schools. Local education authorities, however, have been superseded by centralised curricula on the one hand and by local management of schools on the other. We know little about the impact of these changes on managing chronic conditions such as SCD. A survey was conducted with 107 local authorities in England to assess responses to needs of pupils with SCD. The majority of authorities did not know the numbers of children with SCD under their jurisdiction, even though most agreed with government guidance that all such children should have individual healthcare plans. Only two had policies on SCD and most authorities referred to generic guidance on pupils with medical needs in schools. The paper concludes, however, that such generic guidance fails in a number of ways to meet the needs of young people with SCD, in terms of prevention, challenging disability discrimination and, crucially, in failing to recognise how ethnicity and racism mediate the experiences of young black disabled students. Developing policies suitable for the education needs of young people with SCD would also help develop the very narrow guidance currently suggested for inclusion of pupils with medical conditions.
    • Looking to the future: Framing the implementation of interprofessional education and practice with scenario planning

      Forman, Dawn; Nicol, Pam; Nicol, Paul; University of Derby (Wolters Kluwer, 2015-12)
      Background: Adapting to interprofessional education and practice requires a change of perspective for many health professionals. We aimed to explore the potential of scenario planning to bridge the understanding gap and framing strategic planning for interprofessional education (IPE) and practice (IPP), as well as to implement innovative techniques and technology for large‑group scenario planning. Methods: A full‑day scenario planning workshop incorporating innovative methodology was designed and offered to participants. The 71 participants included academics from nine universities, as well as service providers, government, students and consumer organisations. The outcomes were evaluated by statistical and thematic analysis of a mixed method survey questionnaire. Results: The scenario planning method resulted in a positive response as a means of collaboratively exploring current knowledge and broadening entrenched attitudes. It was perceived to be an effective instrument for framing strategy for the implementation of IPE/IPP, with 81 percent of respondents to a post‑workshop survey indicating they would consider using scenario planning in their own organisations. Discussion: The scenario planning method can be used by tertiary academic institutions as a strategy in developing, implementing and embedding IPE, and for the enculturation of IPP in practice settings.
    • Lower limb prosthetic interfaces: Clinical and technological advancement and potential future direction

      Safari, Reza; University of Derby (SAGE Publications, 2020-11-08)
      The human–prosthesis interface is one of the most complicated challenges facing the field of prosthetics, despite substantive investments in research and development by researchers and clinicians around the world. The journal of the International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics, Prosthetics and Orthotics International, has contributed substantively to the growing body of knowledge on this topic. In celebrating the 50th anniversary of the International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics, this narrative review aims to explore how human–prosthesis interfaces have changed over the last five decades; how research has contributed to an understanding of interface mechanics; how clinical practice has been informed as a result; and what might be potential future directions. Studies reporting on comparison, design, manufacturing and evaluation of lower limb prosthetic sockets, and osseointegration were considered. This review demonstrates that, over the last 50 years, clinical research has improved our understanding of socket designs and their effects; however, high-quality research is still needed. In particular, there have been advances in the development of volume and thermal control mechanisms with a few designs having the potential for clinical application. Similarly, advances in sensing technology, soft tissue quantification techniques, computing technology, and additive manufacturing are moving towards enabling automated, data-driven manufacturing of sockets. In people who are unable to use a prosthetic socket, osseointegration provides a functional solution not available 50 years ago. Furthermore, osseointegration has the potential to facilitate neuromuscular integration. Despite these advances, further improvement in mechanical features of implants, and infection control and prevention are needed.
    • Managing managerialism – how the 21st Century manager can truly thrive.

      Hampson, J.; Howell, T.J.; University of Derby (Youth and Policy, 2018-05)
      Managers embrace the current funding landscape by finding a compromise that allows them to still meet the needs of young people without selling out their values. Managers should be ‘principled pragmatists’, in pursuit of success but cautious to unravel the pedagogy of the profession clearly misunderstood by many commissioners. Rather than seeing targets as limitations, they offer the chance to be creative and refocus work into something truly meaningful. Case studies and narrative enquiries capturing lived experiences can often be the way to a funder’s heart and wallet. By promoting praxis, young people can be involved in the ethical questions around funding projects, in order to avoid teaching young people how to ‘play the system’ and enable them to tackle directly the structural systems of oppression. The socio-political forces continue to both constrain and empower practice, the survival of the profession rests on the shoulders of managers who are able to prove their worth with a foresight for strategy and a passion for people over power. Managers must shed the business-led archetype, acknowledge competitors as potential partners, meet needs less sporadically and use the tools of marketisation to achieve autonomy. By creating services that boast social capital in practitioner expertise, outstanding impactful work can be achieved Youth work is recognised as a distinct pedagogical approach to work with young people, the 21st century manager must be a campaigner where value-driven professionals leading multi-disciplinary teams can co-create change in our communities in spite of commissioners, funders and government.
    • Mental health and wellbeing in parents of excessively crying infants: prospective evaluation of a support package.

      Powell, Charlotte; Bamber, Deborah; Long, Jaqui; Garratt, Rosemary; Brown, Jayne; Rudge, Sally; Morris, Tom; Bhupendra Jaicim, Nishal; Plachcinski, Rachel; Dyson, Sue E.; et al. (John Wiley & Sons Ltd, 2018-04-17)
      Background During the first four months of age, approximately 20% of infants cry a lot without an apparent reason. Most research has targeted the crying and its causes, but there is a need for equal attention to the impact of the crying on parents and subsequent outcomes. This study reports the findings from a prospective evaluation of a package of materials designed to support the wellbeing and mental health of parents who judge their infant to be crying excessively. The resulting ‘Surviving Crying’ package comprised a website, printed materials, and a programme of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy - based support sessions delivered to parents by a qualified practitioner. It was designed to be suitable for National Health Service (NHS) use. Methods Parents were referred to the study by NHS Health Visitors or Community Public Health Nurses. Fifty seven parents of excessively crying babies received the support package and provided rating scale measures of depression, anxiety, frustration because of the crying, and other measures before receiving the support package, together with outcome measures afterwards. Results Significant reductions in depression and anxiety were found with the number of parents meeting clinical criteria for depression or anxiety halving between baseline and outcome. These improvements were not explained by changes in infant crying. Reductions also occurred in the number of parents reporting the crying to be a large or severe problem (from 28 to 3 parents) or feeling very or extremely frustrated by the crying (from 31 to 1 parent). Other findings included increases in parents’ confidence, knowledge of infant crying and improvements in parents’ sleep. Conclusions The findings suggest that the Surviving Crying package may be effective in supporting the wellbeing and mental health of parents of excessively crying babies. Further, large-scale controlled trials of the package in NHS settings are warranted.