• Birth shock!

      Hogan, Susan; University of Derby (Routledge, 2019-07-30)
      Arts Therapies and Gender Issues offers international perspectives on gender in arts therapies research and demonstrates understandings of gender and arts therapies in a variety of global contexts. Analysing current innovations and approaches in the arts therapies, it discusses issues of cultural identity, which intersect with sex, gender norms, stereotypes and sexual identity. The book includes unique and detailed case studies such as the emerging discipline of creative writing for therapeutic purposes, re-enactment phototherapy, performative practice and virtual reality. Bringing together leading researchers, it demonstrates clinical applications and shares ideas about best practice. Incorporating art, drama, dance and music therapy, this book will be of great interest to academics and researchers in the fields of arts therapies, psychology, medicine, psychotherapy, health and education. It will also appeal to practitioners and teachers of art, dance-movement, drama and music therapy.
    • The body of work as a legitimate form of independent scholarship.

      Bird, Jamie; Stephanou, Mary; Wellen, Allessandar; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-10-25)
      This chapter will outline key principles that underpin the use of creativity within final-year projects of undergraduate and postgraduate programmes. It will set forth a rational for directing students towards using a particular form of arts-based research that aids critical thinking and reflexivity whilst engaging in art practice. The programmes referenced in this chapter are delivered at the University of Derby. The undergraduate programme – Creative Expressive Therapies – is outlined in detail within other chapters of this book. The post-graduate programmes include Art Therapy, Dramatherapy and Dance and Movement Psychotherapy. Those postgraduate programmes are regulated by various professional bodies and lead to students being able to practice in their chosen field. What those programmes share is the placing of creativity, art-making and performance at the heart of their pedagogic philosophy and practice. What they also share is a focus upon the therapeutic use of creativity and the therapeutic use of self. Whilst the undergraduate programmes are positioned within an arts in health and arts in education paradigm, the post-graduate programmes are broadly psychotherapeutic in their approach to creativity and therapeutic relationships. Either way, a better understanding of the role of the therapeutic use of creativity and self is enhanced by embedding both into the process of independent scholarship.
    • Broken biosecurity? Veterinarians’ framing of biosecurity on dairy farms in England

      Shortall, Orla; Ruston, Annmarie; Green, Martin; Brennan, Marnie; Wapenaar, Wendela; Kaler, Jasmeet; University of Derby; University of Nottingham; Canterbury Christ Church University (Elsevier, 2016-06-04)
      There is seen to be a need for better biosecurity – the control of disease spread on and off farm – in the dairy sector. Veterinarians play a key role in communicating and implementing biosecurity measures on farm, and little research has been carried out on how veterinarians see their own and farmers’ roles in improving biosecurity. In order to help address this gap, qualitative interviews were carried out with 28 veterinarians from Royal College of Veterinary Surgeon farm accredited practices in England. The results were analysed using a social ecology framework and frame analysis to explore not only what barriers vets identified, but also how vets saw the problem of inadequate biosecurity as being located. Veterinarians’ frames of biosecurity were analysed at the individual, interpersonal and contextual scales, following the social ecology framework, which see the problem in different ways with different solutions. Farmers and veterinarians were both framed by veterinarians as individualised groups lacking consistency. This means that best practice is not spread and veterinarians are finding it difficult to work as a group to move towards a “predict and prevent” model of veterinary intervention. But diversity and individualism were also framed as positive and necessary among veterinarians to the extent that they can tailor advice to individual farmers. Veterinarians saw their role in educating the farmer as not only being about giving advice to farmers, but trying to convince the farmer of their perspective and values on disease problems. Vets felt they were meeting with limited success because vets and farmers may be emphasising different framings of biosecurity. Vets emphasise the individual and interpersonal frames that disease problems are a problem on farm that can and should be controlled by individual farmers working with vets. According to vets, farmers may emphasise the contextual frame that biosecurity is largely outside of their control on dairy farms because of logistical, economic and geographical factors, and so some level of disease on dairy farms is not entirely unexpected or controllable. There needs to be a step back within the vet-farmer relationship to realise that there may be different perspectives at play, and within the wider debate to explore the question of what a biosecure dairy sector would look like within a rapidly changing agricultural landscape
    • Care of the person with dementia : interprofessional practice and education

      Forman, Dawn; Pond, Dimity; University of Derby; Newcastle University Australia (Cambridge University Press, 2015-11)
      Care of the Person with Dementia responds to the urgent need for health practitioners to take an innovative approach to the challenge of dementia. The first Australian text of its kind, it combines evidence-based resources with interprofessional education and practice, exploring the ethical, social and environmental repercussions of dementia to provide a comprehensive overview of dementia care in an Australian context. The text is structured around a model of interprofessional education and practice (IPE) tailored to dementia care. This model incorporates the context of care, an important element missing from other recognised models of IPE. Throughout the book, principles of IPE are explained within the context of dementia, drawing on exemplars from a body of current, well-researched and evaluated dementia practice. Written by experienced academics, and providing national and international perspectives, this is a unique and crucial resource to develop collaborative skills and professional knowledge in the management of dementia.
    • Challenges facing the farm animal veterinary profession in England: A qualitative study of veterinarians’ perceptions and responses

      Ruston, Annmarie; Shortall, Orla; Green, Martin; Brennan, Marnie; Wapenaar, Wendela; Kaler, Jasmeet; University of Derby; Univeristy of Nottingham; Canterbury Christ Church University (Elsevier, 2016-05-14)
      The farm animal veterinary profession in the UK has faced a number of challenges in recent decades related to the withdrawal of government funding and a contraction of the agricultural sector. They have come under pressure to respond by developing skills and focusing on disease prevention advisory services. However, this puts veterinarians in competition with other providers of these services, and moves in this direction have only been partial. Failure to respond to these challenges puts the veterinary profession at risk of de-professionalisation—a loss of their monopoly over knowledge, an erosion of client beliefs in their service ethos and a loss of work autonomy. This paper explores how farm animal veterinarians in England perceive these challenges and are responding to them. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were carried out with 28 veterinarians from Royal College of Veterinary Surgeon farm accredited practices. Veterinarians were chosen from high, medium and low density cattle farming regions. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and themes identified through the constant comparison method. The majority of respondents recognised the challenges facing the veterinary profession. Most believed their role had changed, moving towards that of a disease prevention adviser who was part of the farm management team. In terms of maintaining and redefining their professional status, farm animal veterinarians do have a defined body of knowledge and the ability to develop trusting relationships with clients, which enhances their competitiveness. However, while they recognise the changes and challenges, moves towards a disease prevention advisory model have only been partial. There seem to be little effort towards using Farm accreditation status or other strategies to promote their services. They do not appear to be finding effective strategies for putting their knowledge on disease prevention into practice. Disease prevention appears to be delivered on farm on an ad hoc basis, they are not promoting their disease prevention services to farmers effectively or using their professional position to stave off competition. Farm animals veterinarians will need to realign their veterinary expertise to the demands of the market, work together rather than in competition, improve their skills in preventive medicine, consolidate information given by non-veterinary advisors, develop new business models appropriate to their services and develop entrepreneurial skills to demonstrate their market value if they are to avoid becoming marginalised
    • Cochrane systematic review singing for people with parkinson’s: preliminary findings

      Irons, J. Yoon; coren, Esther; Young, Megan K; Gschwandtner, Manfred; Stewart, Donald E; Mellick, George D; Health and Social Care Research Centre, University of Derby (University of Derby, 2019-06-05)
      This is a Conference (5th World Parkinson's Congress) poster based on the on-going Cochrane Systematic review on the effects of singing for people with Parkinson's.
    • Community Interventions for Health (CIH): A monograph

      Dyson,Pamela; Anthony, Denis; University of Oxford (Oxford Health Alliance, 2015)
      Non communicable disease (NCD), including cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes and chronic respiratory diseases, accounted for over 65.5% of deaths in 2010, with more than 80% of these occurring in low and middle income countries (LMIC). Approximately 30% of the deaths in LMIC occur prematurely and are largely preventable. NCD is also associated with increased morbidity and reduced quality of life, and it has been estimated that the global economic impact of NCD could total US$47 trillion over the next twenty years, equivalent to 5% of GDP. The causes of NCD have their roots in three major modifiable risk factors; tobacco use, physical inactivity and unhealthy diet and prevention of NCD by addressing these factors at the community level is fast becoming an area of interest. Most authorities, including the United Nations (UN), the World Health Organisation (WHO) and the US Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend evidence based strategies for lifestyle interventions, but there is limited high grade evidence for population or community based approaches and most of the available evidence is derived from studies conducted in high risk individuals in high income countries. The population approach is inclusive and addresses many factors including health education, structural environmental change, engagement of health providers, transport and education ministries, policy and legislative initiatives and partnerships and coalitions with community organisations. In 2008, the Oxford Health Alliance, a UK registered health charity (No 1117580), began its Community Interventions for Health (CIH) program which was designed to utilise this population approach and which adopted multi factorial, comprehensive strategies for prevention of NCD by addressing modifiable lifestyle risk factor reduction. CIH is an international collaborative study that took place between 2008 2011 in communities in China, India and Mexico and was designed to reduce the risk of NCD by targeting the three main risk factors of tobacco use, physical inactivity and unhealthy diet. The aim of CIH was to evaluate culturally specific strategies to (i) decrease the prevalence of smoking and smokeless tobacco use, (ii) improve diet by increasing intake of fruit and vegetables and reducing use of salt and (iii) increase levels of physical activity in local communities in India, China and Mexico. CIH was conducted over 5 years, and showed that population based strategies to improve health were effective in adults, and had a positive impact on risk factors for NCD by improving dietary intake and ameliorating secular trends for reduced physical activity and increases in overweight and obesity.
    • Community Interventions for Health can support clinicians in advising patients to reduce tobacco use, improve dietary intake and increase physical activity.

      Anthony, Denis; Dyson, Pamela A; Lv, Jun; Thankappan, Kavumpurathu Raman; Champgane, Beatriz; Matthews, David R; University of Leeds; University of Oxford; Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology; International American Heart Organisation; et al. (Wiley, 2016-07-25)
      AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To increase clinical interventions to reduce modifiable risk factors for noncommunicable disease in low- and middle-income countries. BACKGROUND: Noncommunicable disease is the leading cause of death in the world and is common in low- and middle-income countries. Risk factors for noncommunicable disease are modifiable and health professionals are in an unique position to intervene and influence them. DESIGN: Clinical interventions were used as part of the Community Interventions for Health programme, a nonrandomised, controlled study undertaken in three communities - one each in China, India and Mexico. METHODS: All clinicians in intervention and control areas of the study were invited to complete surveys. A total of 2280 completed surveys at baseline and 2501 at follow-up. Culturally appropriate interventions to reduce tobacco use, improve dietary intake and increase physical activity were delivered in the intervention areas. RESULTS: Clinicians in the intervention group felt more prepared to advise smoking cessation and improvement of diet. They were more likely to test serum cholesterol and blood pressure, but less likely to take measurements of height, hip, waist and skin-fold thickness. There were more resources available to clinicians in the intervention group and they used counselling more and complementary medicine less than those in the control group. CONCLUSIONS: Community interventions which have been shown to have a positive effect in the community and workplace also change clinical practice. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Community interventions make clinicians, including nurses, more likely to feel prepared to offer advice and more likely to use counselling. This would be expected to reduce risk factors in patients.
    • A comparison of the performance of the Braden Q and the Glamorgan paediatric pressure ulcer risk assessment scales in general and intensive care paediatric and neonatal units.

      Willock, Jane; Habiballah, Laila; Long, Deborah; Palmer, Kelli; Anthony, Denis; University of Leeds; University of Oxford (Elsevier, 2016-03-15)
      Aims To compare the predictive ability of two risk assessment scales used in children. Background There are several risk assessment scales (RASs) employed in paediatric settings but most have been modified from adult scales such as the Braden Q whereas the Glamorgan was an example of a scale designed for children. Methods Using incidence data from 513 paediatric hospital admissions, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) was employed to compare the two scales. The area under the curve (AUC) was the outcome of interest. Results The two scales were similar in this population in terms of area under the curve. Neonatal and paediatric intensive care were similar in terms of AUC for both scales but in general paediatric wards the Braden Q may be superior in predicting risk. Conclusion Either scale could be used if the predictive ability was the outcome of interest. The scales appear to work well with neonatal, paediatric intensive care and general children’s wards. However the Glamorgan scale is probably preferred by childrens’ nurses as it is easy to use and designed for use in children. There is some suggestion that while the two scales are similar in intensive care, for general paediatrics the Braden Q may be the better scale.
    • Competencies and frameworks in interprofessional education: A comparative analysis

      Thistlethwaite, Jill; Forman, Dawn; Matthews, Lynda; Rogers, Gary; Steketee, Carole; Yassine, Tagrid; University of Derby (Wolters Kluwer, 2014-06)
      Health professionals need preparation and support to work in collaborative practice teams, a requirement brought about by an aging population and increases in chronic and complex diseases. Therefore, health professions education has seen the introduction of interprofessional education (IPE) competency frameworks to provide a common lens through which disciplines can understand, describe, and implement team-based practices. Whilst an admirable aim, often this has resulted in more confusion with the introduction of varying definitions about similar constructs, particularly in relation to what IPE actually means.The authors explore the nature of the terms competency and framework, while critically appraising the concept of competency frameworks and competency-based education. They distinguish between competencies for health professions that are profession specific, those that are generic, and those that may be achieved only through IPE. Four IPE frameworks are compared to consider their similarities and differences, which ultimately influence how IPE is implemented. They are the Interprofessional Capability Framework (United Kingdom), the National Interprofessional Competency Framework (Canada), the Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice (United States), and the Curtin University Interprofessional Capability Framework (Australia).The authors highlight the need for further discussion about establishing a common language, strengthening ways in which academic environments work with practice environments, and improving the assessment of interprofessional competencies and teamwork, including the development of assessment tools for collaborative practice. They also argue that for IPE frameworks to be genuinely useful, they need to augment existing curricula by emphasizing outcomes that might be attained only through interprofessional activity
    • Conflict management styles used by nurses in Jordan

      Al-Hamdan, Zaid; Norrie, Peter; Anthony, Denis; University of Leeds; Jordan University of Science and Technology, Jordan; De Montfort University, Leicester; Assistant Professor, Faculty of Nursing, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Jordan; Principal Lecturer and Senior Research Fellow, School of Nursing and Midwifery, De Montfort University, UK; Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, De Montfort University, UK (Sage, 2014-02-01)
      The aim of this study is to investigate the conflict management styles used by nurse managers in Jordan. There are five main styles which nurse managers use to deal with conflict. At present research into their utilisation is dominated by reports from Western countries. This research is the second to investigate their use by nurses in an Arab country and it illustrates both similarities and differences with this earlier work, allowing an initial profile to be constructed which may be applicable to the larger Arab world of health care. Cross sectional quantitative survey of nurse managers in Jordan. The Rahim Organisation Conflict Inventory (ROCI II) questionnaire was completed by 350 (83% response).The nurse managers were most likely to use an integrating style of conflict management, followed in rank order by comprising, obliging, dominating and avoiding. A tentative model of the styles which nurse managers in Arab countries use to manage conflict is proposed, which suggests that these managers are likely to provide stable workplaces.
    • Coping with joint pain in haemophilia

      Bailey, Jacqueline; Robinson, Georgina; Elander, James; London Metropolitan University; University of Surrey (British Psychological Society, 2005-05-01)
      Some Rolling Stones fans might think that joint bleeds in haemophilia are now more a case of ‘Its all over now’ than ‘Let it bleed’, for just as Mick Jagger’s song writing skills have changed since the 1960s and 70s, so has haemophilia care - treatment has improved dramatically over the last 30 years. Prophylactic clotting factor concentrates are now commonly used to prevent bleeding episodes among patients with severe haemophilia. Many patients, however, and especially those aged over 40, still live with chronic pain caused by arthritic complications of repeated bleeds into joints, leading to disability and reduced quality of life, and this aspect of the condition has not been widely recognised by health psychologists. Haemophilia patients' experiences of pain were the subject of a recent health psychology work placement and are the focus of an ongoing research project, collaborations with the UK Haemophilia Society, and this article summarises some aspects of that work.
    • Creating a coaching culture for managers in your organisation

      Forman, Dawn; Joyce, Mary; McMahon, Gladeana; Univeristy of Derby (Routledge, 2013)
      Creating a Coaching Culture for Managers in your Organisation is for managers leaders and coaches interested in extending the practice of coaching to achieve broader organisational outcomes. The book offers a practical approach on how to use coaching strategically to create a culture that supports change, builds leadership capacity, and achieves a high degree of alignment between the goals and aspirations of organisations, and their staff.
    • Creation of consensus recommendations for collaborative practice in the Malaysian psychiatric system: a modified Delphi study

      Shoesmith, Wendy; Chua, Sze Hung; Giridharan, Beena; Forman, Dawn; Fyfe, Sue; University Malaysia Sabah, Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia; Ministry of Health, Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia; Curtin University, Miri, Sarawak, Malaysia; University of Derby (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2020-06-19)
      There is strong evidence that collaborative practice in mental healthcare improves outcomes for patients. The concept of collaborative practice can include collaboration between healthcare workers of different professional backgrounds and collaboration with patients, families and communities. Most models of collaborative practice were developed in Western and high-income countries and are not easily translatable to settings which are culturally diverse and lower in resources. This project aimed to develop a set of recommendations to improve collaborative practice in Malaysia. In the first phase, qualitative research was conducted to better understand collaboration in a psychiatric hospital (previously published). In the second phase a local hospital level committee from the same hospital was created to act on the qualitative research and create a set of recommendations to improve collaborative practice at the hospital for the hospital. Some of these recommendations were implemented, where feasible and the outcomes discussed. These recommendations were then sent to a nationwide Delphi panel. These committees consisted of healthcare staff of various professions, patients and carers. The Delphi panel reached consensus after three rounds. The recommendations include ways to improve collaborative problem solving and decision making in the hospital, ways to improve the autonomy and relatedness of patients, carers and staff and ways to improve the levels of resources (e.g. skills training in staff, allowing people with lived experience of mental disorder to contribute). This study showed that the Delphi method is a feasible method of developing recommendations and guidelines in Malaysia and allowed a wider range of stakeholders to contribute than traditional methods of developing guidelines and recommendations.
    • Creative ageing: the social policy challenge.

      Hogan, Susan; Bradfield, E.; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-11-27)
      By 2071, the number of people over 65 could double to nearly 21.3 million, while the number of people aged 80 and over could more than treble to 9.5 million. Over the next 30 years, the number of people with dementia in the UK could double to 1.4 million. The current policy landscape marks a shift in thinking, away from ‘deficit’ models of later life towards a paradigm shift which ‘allows people to realise their potential for physical, social, and mental wellbeing throughout the life-course and to participate in society’ (World Health Organisation 2002, p. 3). Where previous models of later-life care have focused on supporting acute illness in older age, health-care systems are now forced to find ways to support individuals to take responsibility for their own health within their own communities. In 2008, the New Economics Foundation (NEF) was commissioned by the UK Government’s Foresight Project on Mental Capital and Wellbeing to review the interdisciplinary work of more than 400 researchers from across the world. The aim was to identify a set of evidencebased actions to improve wellbeing which individuals could be encouraged to build into their daily lives. This was distilled down to the Five Ways to Wellbeing, which is now a major driver of health policy in the UK. They are: connect, be active, take notice, keep learning, give This chapter will look at how different types of creativity in older age can meet the social policy recommendations embodied within the Five Ways to Wellbeing with specific detailed examples. The chapter will also relate this to the ongoing work on wellbeing, post-2008. Though some commentators have suggested this formulation is absurdly reductive, Five Ways to Wellbeing has had considerable success in being accessible to a wide-range of audiences and easy to embed in policy statements and to communicate to community-based organisational teams. Following a brief introduction to the British policy context, this chapter looks at ways in which Five Ways to Wellbeing can be realised through arts engagement providing detailed examples of arts practices that help sustain a creative older age.
    • Critical Pedagogy in Nursing: Transformational Approaches to Nurse Education in a Globalized World

      Dyson, Sue E. (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018)
      This book explores the academic processes of nursing education in times of uncertainty around healthcare policy and healthcare provision. Grounded in research examining current theory, policy and culture around nursing pedagogy, Sue Dyson addresses the core issues facing nurses today and argues that the current curriculum no longer reflects or serves contemporary nursing practice. In a time of scandals, cuts in funding and shortfalls in the profession, this book provides an answer to the growing call for a dynamic restructuring of nurse education. Offering a critical analysis of innovative pedagogies for nursing, the author proposes the notion of the co-created curriculum as a way forward for nurse education in the post-Francis era. This will be an invaluable read to academics, practitioners and policy makers in the fields of nursing, medicine, education, education policy and medical sociology.
    • Critical realism, agency and sickle cell: case studies of young people with sickle cell disorder at school

      Dyson, Simon M.; Atkin, Karl; Culley, Lorraine; Dyson, Sue E. (Taylor and Francis, 2013-07-26)
      Critical realism suggests that historical structures may operate as underlying generative mechanisms but not always be activated. This explains the near-absence of references to racism by black students with sickle cell disorder (SCD). Through case studies we show how latent mechanisms are not activated, and how social actors come to develop corporate agency. Themes discussed include: wider/historical racisms (carers' own experiences of overt racism at school); conscious actions (moving away from a school where racism was experienced); naming racism as an emergent strategy (when communal discussions enable multiple negative experiences to be framed and named as racism); and `passing` (not ostensibly experiencing racism if one is sufficiently light-skinned). Critical realism suggests how racism may be structuring the experiences of students with SCD at school even in the absence of specific accounts by young people.
    • Curriculum renewal for interprofessional education in health

      Dunston, Roger; Forman, Dawn; Rogers, Gary; Thistlethwaite, Jill; Yassine, Tagrid; Hager, Jane; Manidis, Maria; Rossiter, Chris; Curtin University (Office for Learning and Teaching Australia, 2014-01)
      In this preface we comment on four matters that we think bode well for the future of interprofessional education in Australia. First, there is a growing articulation, nationally and globally, as to the importance of interprofessional education and its contribution to the development of interprofessional and collaborative health practices. These practices are increasingly recognised as central to delivering effective, efficient, safe and sustainable health services. Second, there is a rapidly growing interest and institutional engagement with interprofessional education as part of pre-registration health professional education. This has changed substantially in recent years. Whilst beyond the scope of our current studies, the need for similar developments in continuing professional development (CPD) for health professionals was a consistent topic in our stakeholder consultations. Third, we observe what might be termed a threshold effect occurring in the area of interprofessional education. Projects that address matters relating to IPE are now far more numerous, visible and discussed in terms of their aggregate outcomes. The impact of this momentum is visible across the higher education sector. Finally, we believe that effective collaboration is a critical mediating process through which the rich resources of disciplinary knowledge and capability are joined to add value to existing health service provision. We trust the conceptual and practical contributions and resources presented and discussed in this report contribute to these developments.
    • Curriculum renewal in interprofessional education in health: establishing leadership and capacity

      Forman, Dawn; Dunston, Roger; Thistlethwaite, Jill; Moran, Monica Catherine; Steketee, Carole; University of Derby (Office for Learning and Teaching Australia, 2016)
      The Curriculum Renewal for Interprofessional Education in Health: ‘Establishing Leadership and Capacity’ (ELC) project builds from a number of Australian and global studies and reports that address a range of critical issues associated with the development of interprofessional education (IPE) and interprofessional practice (IPP) within Australia and globally2.
    • The determination of finger flexor critical force in rock climbers

      Giles, David; Chidley, Joe;; Taylor, Nicola; Torr, Ollie; Hadley, Josh; Randall, Tom; Fryer, Simon; University of Derby (Human Kinetics, 2019-04)
      Purpose: To determine if the mathematical model used for the estimation of critical force (CF) and the energy store component W’ is applicable to intermittent isometric muscle actions of the finger flexors of rock climbers, using a multi-session test. As a secondary aim, the agreement of estimates of CF and W’ from a single-session test were also determined. The CF was defined as the slope coefficient and W’ the intercept of the linear relationship between total “isometric work” (Wlim) and time to exhaustion (Tlim). Methods: Subjects performed three (separated by either 20 m or >24 h) tests to failure using intermittent isometric finger flexor contractions at 45, 60 and 80% of their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Results: Force plotted against Tlim displayed a hyperbolic relationship, correlation coefficients of the parameter estimates from the work–time CF model were consistently very high (R2 > 0.94). Climbers mean CF was 425.7 ± 82.8 N (41.0 ± 6.2% MVC) and W’ 30882 ± 11820 N·s. Good agreement was found between the single and multi-session protocol for CF (ICC(3,1) = 0.900, 95% Confidence Interval [CI95%] 0.616 – 0.979), but not for W’ (ICC(3,1) = 0.768, CI95% 0.190 – 0.949). Conclusions: The results demonstrated the sensitivity of a simple test for the determination of CF and W’, using equipment readily available in most climbing gyms. While further work is still necessary, the test of CF described is of value for understanding exercise tolerance and determine optimal training prescription to monitor improvements the performance of the finger flexors.