• Prevalence of pressure ulcers in Africa: A systematic review and meta-analysis

      Anthony, Denis; Alosaimi, Dalyal; Korsah, Kwadwo; Safari, Reza; Shiferaw, Wondimeneh Shibabaw; University of Derby; College of Nursing, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia; Institute of Medicine and College of Health Sciences, Debre Berhan University, Ethiopia; School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Ghana, Ghana (Elsevier, 2021-10-27)
      A recent global review of pressure ulcers contained no studies from Africa. To identify the prevalence and incidence of pressure ulcers in Africa. Bibliographic databases, African specific databases, grey literature. Studies with prevalence or incidence data of pressure ulcers from Africa since the year 2000. Any age, including children, in any setting, specifically including hospital patients from any clinical area but not restricted to hospital settings. Holy score for bias, Joanna Briggs Institute Critical Appraisal Instrument. We followed the PRISMA guideline for systematic reviews. We searched Embase, Medline, Scopus, CINHAL, Google Scholar, specialist African databases and grey literature for studies reporting incidence or prevalence data. Nineteen studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in the study. Point prevalence rates varied from 3.4% to 18.6% for medical/surgical and other general hospital units with a pooled prevalence of 11%, for grades II-IV 5%. For spinal injury units the pooled prevalence was 44%. Restricted to English, French and Arabic. Prevalence of pressure ulcers in Africa reported here is similar to figures from a recent review of prevalence in Europe and two recent global reviews of hospitalised patients. Prevalence of pressure ulcers in spinal cord injury patients is similar to figures from a review of developing countries. The reporting of prevalence is lacking in detail in some studies. Studies using an observational design employing physical examination of patients showed higher prevalence than those relying on other methods such as medical notes or databases. Further prevalence and incidence studies are needed in Africa. Reporting of such studies should ensure items in the “Checklist for Prevalence Studies” from Joanna Briggs Institute (or similar well regarded resources) are addressed and the PICOS model and PRISMA guidelines are employed. Systematic review registration number. Prospero registration number CRD42020180093
    • Multiple emotions, multiple selves: compassion focused therapy chairwork

      Bell, Tobyn; Montague, Jane; Elander, James; Gilbert, Paul; University of Derby (Cambridge University Press (CUP), 2021-07-19)
      Compassion focused therapy (CFT) is rooted in an evolutionary view of the human mind as formed of a multitude of contrasting, and often conflicting, motivations, emotions and competencies. A core aim of the therapy is to help clients understand the nature of their mind in a way that is de-pathologizing and de-shaming. The approach is also focused on the cultivation of compassion to work with these difficult aspects of mind. CFT includes the ‘multiple-selves’ intervention which involves the differentiation of threat-based emotion and an exploration of their conflict. Compassion is then applied to the client’s affective world to aid regulation and integration. This paper focuses on clients’ experiences of a chairwork version of multiple-selves, wherein clients personify their emotions in separate chairs. Nine participants with depression were interviewed directly following the intervention and the resulting data were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Three interconnecting themes were identified: appreciating emotional complexity; the role of chairwork process; and compassionate integration. The results highlight the importance of emotional differentiation in understanding internal multiplicity and conflict in depression, and the role of compassion in creating a sense of personal coherence. The embodied and enactive nature of chairwork was found to be of benefit in identifying and separating emotion, and in developing new forms of self-relating. The paper discusses the clinical implications of such findings for the treatment of depression.
    • ‘It’s quite a taboo subject’: an investigation of mother’s experiences of breastfeeding beyond infancy and the challenges they face

      Jackson, Jessica; Hallam, Jenny; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2021-06-10)
      Current recommendations state that women should breastfeed their child up to 2 years and beyond. However, the UK has one of the lowest breastfeeding rates in the world. This could in part be explained by the stigma mothers face when breastfeeding an older child. This research aims to provide a detailed understanding of what motivates women to continue breastfeeding beyond infancy and the barriers they face to (i) add to existing research literature which has examined this area and (ii) support and normalize this practice. Semi-structured interviews were conducted between April and June 2018 with 24 women who had breastfed at least one child past 12 months. A theory-driven thematic analysis identified themes that ran through the interviews centering on the benefits of continued breastfeeding, the stigma mothers faced when breastfeeding past infancy and the challenges of returning to work. The women felt that continued breastfeeding enabled them to play a central role in their child’s health and develop an attachment led parental style but faced social and cultural stigma due to a lack of public awareness of current breastfeeding recommendations. Interventions which raise awareness of breastfeeding beyond infancy are needed to normalize this practice in the UK.
    • Which exercise and behavioural interventions show most promise for treating fatigue in multiple sclerosis? A network meta-analysis

      Harrison, Anthony M; Safari, Reza; Mercer, Tom; Picariello, Federica; van der Linden, Marietta L; White, Claire; Moss-Morris, Rona; Norton, Sam; University of Derby (SAGE Publications, 2021-04-20)
      Fatigue is a common, debilitating symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS) without a current standardised treatment. The aim of this systematic review with network meta-analyses was to estimate the relative effectiveness of both fatigue-targeted and non-targeted exercise, behavioural and combined (behavioural and exercise) interventions. Nine electronic databases up to August 2018 were searched, and 113 trials (n = 6909) were included: 34 were fatigue-targeted and 79 non-fatigue-targeted trials. Intervention characteristics were extracted using the Template for Intervention Description and Replication guidelines. Certainty of evidence was assessed using GRADE. Pairwise meta-analyses showed that exercise interventions demonstrated moderate to large effects across subtypes regardless of treatment target, with the largest effect for balance exercise (SMD = 0.84). Cognitive behavioural therapies (CBTs) showed moderate to large effects (SMD = 0.60), with fatigue-targeted treatments showing larger effects than those targeting distress. Network meta-analysis showed that balance exercise performed significantly better compared to other exercise and behavioural intervention subtypes, except CBT. CBT was estimated to be superior to energy conservation and other behavioural interventions. Combined exercise also had a moderate to large effect. Treatment recommendations for balance and combined exercise are tentative as the certainty of the evidence was moderate. The certainty of the evidence for CBT was high.
    • Exploring factors having an impact on attitudes and motivations towards volunteering in the undergraduate nursing student population − A comparative study of the UK and Ghana

      Dyson, Sue E.; Korsah, K.A.; Liu, L.Q.; O’Driscoll, M.; van den Akker, O.B.A; University of Derby; University of Ghana; Middlesex University (Elsevier, 2021-04-10)
      This study explores attitudes and motivations towards volunteering in nursing students in Ghana compared with nursing students in the United Kingdom (UK). Ghana traditionally follows a western model of nurse education, with students studying programmes commensurate in theory and practice, making Ghana a suitable location for a comparative study. We explored similarities and differences in attitudes and motivation towards volunteering to challenge and inform our common place practice towards nursing pedagogy. Ghanaian students displayed positive attitudes towards volunteering, although these did not translate into increased motivation to volunteer while at university. Students reported financial constraints as reasons for not volunteering as did UK students, although Ghanaian students used available resources for daily living expenses, whereas UK students prioritised available resources to pay down student debt. Structured volunteering was absent from both Ghanaian and UK nursing programmes, despite its potential to increase the variety of social groups or situations to which students are exposed, to increase self-confidence and to encourage greater reflection on practice through doing. Structural challenges within countries may provide a better explanation of variation in student motivation towards volunteering, than cross-cultural variation in attitudes towards volunteering between countries.
    • Singing

      Irons, J. Yoon; Hancox, Grenville; University of Derby; Canterbury Christ Church University (Emerald Publishing Limited, 2021-03-18)
      We are 'hard-wired' to sing - singing has defined our evolution. Through singing we express our feelings, communicate and connect with others. We are all singers: singing is part of us and defines cultures worldwide. Singing also, importantly, makes us feel better: it is, undoubtedly, good for us. This book provides an important overview of current research showing the benefits of singing on our health and wellbeing. Case studies illustrate its power - for example, how singing helps hospitalised children and a man living with Parkinson's. The book also discusses potential barriers for singing and useful strategies needed to overcome them. An example of a community singing group is also demonstrated, alongside practical advice on facilitating community singing groups for health and wellbeing. The book will be valuable to professionals working in health and social care settings, to practitioners and educators interested in engaging in singing for health promotion, and individuals looking to find out more about the benefits and practicalities of singing.
    • Physical activity: understanding and addressing inequalities

      Jackson, Jessica; Roscoe, Clare M. P.; Mourton, Niamh; University of Derby (Public Health England, 2021-02-22)
      This guidance can be used by local level practitioners and commissioners to begin tackling inequalities in physical activity across and within protected characteristic groups. It presents the findings of a review, analysis and research aimed at understanding the enablers, barriers and opportunities for increasing physical activity across inequality groups. Three major themes are identified as considerations for action by practitioners and commissioners: enablers, barriers, and identifying opportunity community consultation, engagement, and partnership adopting a holistic approach for protected characteristics and intersectionality The document concludes with a full set of recommendations for commissioners and practitioners to consider when designing services and interventions locally.
    • How Many Maneuvers Should We Do for Maximal Inspiratory and Expiratory Muscle Pressure Testing in Children: A Retrospective Review in Children with Cystic Fibrosis

      Boonjindasup, Wicharn; Chang, Anne B.; Marchant, Julie M.; Irons, J. Yoon; McElrea, Margaret S.; Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT, Australia; Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand; Cough, Asthma & Airways Research Group, Centre for Children’s Health Research, Level 7, 62 Graham Street, South Brisbane, QLD, 4101, Australia; Queensland Children’s Hospital, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; et al. (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2021-02-15)
      Objectives Maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) could be useful clinical parameters in monitoring many conditions including cystic fibrosis (CF). However, current protocols for undertaking the measurements lack standardization including the number of repeated attempts to achieve best values. We aimed to (a) determine the optimum number of attempts to achieve best MIP/MEP values, and (b) evaluate if the number of attempts is consistent across two different test days. Methods We analyzed data of a previous randomized controlled trial involving the effect of singing on respiratory muscle strength in 35 children with CF. On two different days (T1, T2) children performed MIP/MEP with at least ten attempts each to achieve < 10% repeatability. Results All children achieved repeatable MIP/MEP values within 10–11 attempts with 24 (68.6%) and 26 (74.3%) of these achieving best values of MIP and MEP, respectively, at attempts 6–11. Median values of the pressures by three, five, eight and all attempts significantly increased with more attempts (all p < 0.05). At T2, 56% required fewer attempts to achieve best values, but 32% required more attempts, indicating that the number of attempts required was inconsistent between test days. Conclusion It is likely that at least ten attempts (best two within < 10% variability) is required to achieve best and reliable MIP/MEP in children with CF. A larger sample size in children with CF and various conditions is required to consolidate these findings.
    • A systematic review of evidence about the role of alexithymia in chronic back pain

      Elander, James; Kapadi, Romaana; Bateman, Antony H.; University of Derby; Royal Derby Spinal Centre, University Hospitals of Derby and Burton NHS Foundation Trust (British Psychological Society, 2021-02-01)
      Individuals with alexithymia struggle to make sense of their emotions. Alexithymia has been associated with a range of physical illnesses, but may influence different illnesses differently, so to understand the role of alexithymia in illness it is important to focus on specific conditions. This article reviews evidence from ten reports published between 2000 and 2018 of studies with samples of adults with chronic back pain that used the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS). The studies were conducted in Germany, Israel, Italy, Russia, Turkey and the USA. Eight studies involved clinical samples and two involved public transit workers. Studies that compared participants with high and low alexithymia consistently found associations with measures of pain. The findings show that more severe alexithymia plays a role in the experience of chronic back pain, and support the incorporation of alexithymia-related elements in interventions to help people with chronic back pain improve their emotional regulation and reduce their pain-related distress.
    • An integrative systematic review of creative arts interventions for older informal caregivers of people with neurological conditions.

      Irons, J Yoon; Garip, Gulcan; Cross, Ainslea J; Sheffield, David; Bird, Jamie; University of Derby (PloS, 2020-12-07)
      We aimed to assess and synthesise the current state of quantitative and qualitative research concerning creative arts interventions for older informal caregivers of people with neurological conditions. A systematic search was employed to identify studies that examined creative arts interventions for older informal caregivers, which were synthesised in this integrative review. We searched the following databases: MEDLINE, PubMed, EBSCO, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, Scopus, Web of Science, and Google Scholar. We also backwards searched references of all relevant studies and inspected trials registers. Of the 516 studies identified, 17 were included: one was quantitative, nine were qualitative and seven used mixed methods. All included quantitative studies were pilot or feasibility studies employing pre- and post-test design with small sample sizes. Studies varied in relation to the type of creative intervention and evaluation methods, which precluded meta-analysis. Large effect sizes were detected in wellbeing measures following singing and art interventions. The qualitative synthesis highlighted that interventions created space for caregivers to make sense of, accept and adapt to their identity as a caregiver. Personal developments, such as learning new skills, were viewed positively by caregivers as well as welcoming the opportunity to gain cognitive and behavioural skills, and having opportunities to unload emotions in a safe space were important to caregivers. Group creative interventions were particularly helpful in creating social connections with their care-recipients and other caregivers. The current review revealed all creative interventions focused on caregivers of people living with dementia; subsequently, this identified gaps in the evidence of creative interventions for informal caregivers of other neurological conditions. There are encouraging preliminary data on music and art interventions, however, little data exists on other art forms, e.g., drama, dance. Creative interventions may appeal to many caregivers, offering a range of psycho-social benefits. The findings of the current review open the way for future research to develop appropriate and creative arts programmes and to test their efficacy with robust tools.
    • Florence Nightingale (1820–1910) – what does history say about her feminism?

      Hogan, Susan; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2020-11-28)
      Is Florence Nightingale becoming unfashionable? The UK’s largest union UNISON voted to drop the use of Nightingale’s image for their union as she was considered to be unrepresentative of modern nursing. One of those backing the motion is on record as saying, ‘All over Eastern Europe, statues of Lenin are being taken off their pedestals, dismantled and pulled off to be cut up.… It is in the same vein that we must enter the new Millennium, start to exorcise the myth of Florence Nightingale’. This paper will discuss modern attitudes to Nightingale in terms of her feminism (not a term she used of herself) and survey scholarly articles that address Nightingale in relation to the position of women. It ends with reflections on the iconography of notable women.
    • Lower limb prosthetic interfaces: Clinical and technological advancement and potential future direction

      Safari, Reza; University of Derby (SAGE Publications, 2020-11-08)
      The human–prosthesis interface is one of the most complicated challenges facing the field of prosthetics, despite substantive investments in research and development by researchers and clinicians around the world. The journal of the International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics, Prosthetics and Orthotics International, has contributed substantively to the growing body of knowledge on this topic. In celebrating the 50th anniversary of the International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics, this narrative review aims to explore how human–prosthesis interfaces have changed over the last five decades; how research has contributed to an understanding of interface mechanics; how clinical practice has been informed as a result; and what might be potential future directions. Studies reporting on comparison, design, manufacturing and evaluation of lower limb prosthetic sockets, and osseointegration were considered. This review demonstrates that, over the last 50 years, clinical research has improved our understanding of socket designs and their effects; however, high-quality research is still needed. In particular, there have been advances in the development of volume and thermal control mechanisms with a few designs having the potential for clinical application. Similarly, advances in sensing technology, soft tissue quantification techniques, computing technology, and additive manufacturing are moving towards enabling automated, data-driven manufacturing of sockets. In people who are unable to use a prosthetic socket, osseointegration provides a functional solution not available 50 years ago. Furthermore, osseointegration has the potential to facilitate neuromuscular integration. Despite these advances, further improvement in mechanical features of implants, and infection control and prevention are needed.
    • "I don’t want to hold your hand": Can Covid-19 public health messages delivered through songs?

      Sheffield, David; Irons, J Yoon; University of Derby (The British Psychological Society, 2020-10-28)
      In response to the outbreak of Covid-19, governments around the world have published their guidelines including rigorous hand washing, respiratory etiquette, social distancing and restrictions in movements and gatherings (European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, 2020). Songs have been used to share key advice since the start of the outbreak in many countries (Hui, 2020). In the UK, the first advice proffered concerned rigorous hand washing.
    • How healthcare providers’ own death anxiety influences their communication with patients in end-of-life care: A thematic analysis

      Clare, Emma; Elander, James; Baraniak, Amy; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2020-10-27)
      Healthcare providers’ own death anxiety can influence end-of-life communication. We interviewed nine palliative care health providers about their experiences of providing end-of-life care. Participants also completed the Revised Death Anxiety Scale. A thematic analysis of the interview transcripts identified one theme labelled ‘avoidant coping’ and another labelled ‘death anxiety awareness’, which are presented in the context of the participants’ own Revised Death Anxiety Scale scores. The findings show that avoidant death anxiety coping can compromise end-of-life communication, but that greater awareness of death anxiety can help overcome avoidant coping. The findings can inform potential improvements in healthcare practice and training.
    • Using behavioural insights to reduce sugar in primary school children's packed lunches in derby; A cluster randomised controlled trial

      Bunten, Amanda; Porter, Lucy; Burgess-Allen, Jilla; Howell-Jones, Rebecca; Jackson, Jessica; Ward, Derek; Staples, Vicki; Staples, Paul; Rowthorn, Harriet; Saei, Ayoub; et al. (Elsevier BV, 2020-10-08)
      Children's packed lunches contain more sugar than school-provided meals. Interventions to improve the provision of healthier packed lunches have modest effects on lunch contents. This cluster randomised controlled trial tested an intervention to encourage healthier provision of packed lunches by parents of primary school children in Derby. Schools were randomised to intervention (n = 8) or control (n = 9) using blocked random allocation. In the intervention group, parents of children who brought packed lunches to school in years 3–6 (age 7–11 years) received three bundles of materials (including packed lunch planner, shopping list, information on sugar content of popular lunchbox items and suggestions for healthier swap alternatives) in bookbags/lunchboxes over a 4-week period. Control parents received no materials. Photos of lunchbox contents were taken at baseline, immediately post-intervention and at three-month follow-up. A parental survey aimed to assess capability, opportunity and motivation for packing a healthier lunchbox. No intervention effects were observed for primary outcomes (presence and number of sugary snacks or chilled sugary desserts). The intervention had a significant impact on one secondary outcome (increased number of healthier “swap” items suggested in intervention materials) immediately post-intervention, but this effect had disappeared at three-month follow-up. No intervention effects were found on survey variables. Parent comments revealed that materials were either received positively (as they reinforced existing behaviours) or negatively (as they were not perceived to be helpful or appropriate). The results of this study suggest that providing educational materials and resources to parents of primary school children in Derby was not sufficient to increase provision of healthier packed lunches. Future research should investigate how behavioural science can support families to improve the nutritional content of primary school children's lunchboxes.
    • Development of NURSE education in Saudi Arabia, Jordan and Ghana: From undergraduate to doctoral programmes

      Anthony, Denis; Alosaimi, Dalyal; Dyson, Sue E.; Saleh, Mohammad; Korsah, Kwadwo; University of Derby; King Saud University, Saudi Arabia; University of Ghana, Ghana; University of Jordan, Jordan (Elseiver, 2020-08-18)
      Doctoral programmes in nursing have a long history in the US where traditional research based PhDs and more clinically based doctoral programmes are common. In the rest of the world PhDs are better accepted though professional doctorates with a thesis component are common in the UK. In countries with newly established or planned doctoral programmes in nursing the research PhD seems the degree of choice. Here we discuss developments in Jordan, Saudi Arabia and Ghana. This study used official documents, strategic plans, curriculum developments and other documentary evidence from Saudi Arabia, Jordan and Ghana. We compared doctoral programmes and development with other countries by reference to the literature. We offer the example of public health and non-communicable diseases in particular as one area where doctorally trained nurses applying international standards in collaboration internationally may be of benefit.
    • Arts in health: Pregnancy, birth & new parenthood

      Hogan, Susan; University of Derby (Routledge, 2020-08-06)
      Art making offers a means for women to express and understand their changed sense of self-identity and sexuality as a result of pregnancy and motherhood. This introduction presents an overview of the key concepts discussed in the subsequent chapters of this book. The book introduces readers to the various ways in which art is being used with women who are experiencing different stages of childbearing–who may be unable to conceive and are struggling with infertility treatment, or experience miscarriage and loss, or are facing other issues of adjustment. It acknowledges that ideals around pregnancy and childbirth are highly contested, that this contestation, coupled with the very liminality of the event itself is challenging, if not potentially destabilising for new mothers and their partners. The English political activist and law reporter Vanessa Olorenshaw has pointed out that motherhood demands interdependence and sits uncomfortably with the dominant neo-liberal ideology of ‘self’ and ‘individualism’ as the core objects of a happy selfhood.
    • Developing an Australia wide approach to IPE leadership and sustainability

      Moran, Monica; Forman, Dawn; O’Keefe, Maree; Steketee, Carole; Rogers, Gary D.; Dunston, Roger; University of Western Australia, Geraldton, Australia; University of Derby; University of Adelaide, Australia; University of Notre Dame, Fremantle, Australia; et al. (Springer International Publishing, 2020-07-28)
      Australia is a country and a continent. Whilst health standards are ranked amongst the best in the world, its immense size and distributed population creates unique challenges for the delivery of integrated health and social care services.
    • Developing and maintaining leadership, resilience and sustainability in interprofessional collaboration

      Forman, Dawn; University of Derby (Springer International Publishing, 2020-07-28)
      Interprofessional collaboration has grown significantly in health care organisations, becoming a critical part of the way in which health and social care is delivered. It is now seen as an essential part of effective health care delivery. Health professionals can be assigned to designated teams due to the increasing complexity of health care delivery, or more commonly a number of professionals with different expertise work together in collaborations which can be configured over some distance (Thistlethwaite, Dunston, & Yassine in Journal of Interprofessional Care 32:745–751, 2019).
    • Governance options for effective interprofessional education: Exposing the gap between education and healthcare services

      O’Keefe, Maree; Forman, Dawn; Moran, Monica; Steketee, Carole; The University of Adelaide, Australia; University of Derby; The University of Western, Australia; The University of Notre Dame Australia (Informa UK Limited, 2020-07-24)
      The increase in interprofessional models of collaborative practice and identification of health services as interprofessional organisations, sits somewhat awkwardly with traditional governance systems for both health services and educational institutions. Whereas health services have a primary focus on assuring competence and safety for health care practice, educational institutions have a primary focus on assuring academic standards within specific qualifications. Bridging the gap between these two systems with a workable option has proven challenging, especially in relation to interprofessional education (IPE). Given the need to ensure ‘work ready’ graduates within a more interprofessional and collaborative workforce, it is important to review the quality assurance governance models that are in place and to consider which of these existing governance systems, if either, is the more appropriate model for enabling and supporting IPE. This paper describes current issues in relation to governance for quality assurance, summarises the current state of research in the field and discusses potential governance options moving forward. Given that existing governance models are not meeting the challenges of IPE, there is a need to achieve greater alignment between the academic and health service governing systems.