• Group singing has multiple benefits in the context of chronic pain: an exploratory pilot study

      Irons, J. Yoon; Kuipers, Pim; Wan, Aston; Stewart, Donald E; Health and Social Care Research Centre, University of Derby (Elsevier, 2019-09-05)
      This paper reports findings of a pilot singing intervention to assist people living with chronic pain. Pain Management Clinic out-patients participated in 10 weekly group singing sessions. Benefits of the intervention and its impact on participants’ (N=4) experience of pain were explored qualitatively. Three main themes comprising over 20 separate codes indicated physical, psychological and social dimensions associated with the intervention. People with chronic pain identify multiple benefits from participating in a group singing program. Group singing in chronic pain settings has multiple benefits; and can be a beneficial adjunct to conventional pain management care and nursing, which may positively complement clinical outcomes.
    • Parental and health professional evaluations of a support service for parents of excessively crying infants

      Bamber, Deborah; Powell, Charlotte; Long, Jaqui; Garratt, Rosie; Brown, Jayne; Rudge, Sally; Morris, Tom; Bhupendra Jaicim, Nishal; Plachcinski, Rachel; Dyson, Sue E.; et al. (Springer Nature/ BMC, 2019-08-22)
      The ‘Surviving Crying’ study was designed to develop and provisionally evaluate a support service for parents of excessively crying babies, including its suitability for use in the United Kingdom (UK) National Health Service (NHS). The resulting service includes three materials: a website, a printed booklet, and a Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) programme delivered to parents by a qualified professional. This study aimed to measure whether parents used the materials and to obtain parents’ and NHS professionals’ evaluations of whether they are fit for purpose. Parents were asked about participating in a randomised controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate the materials fully in health service use. Methods: Participants were 57 parents with babies they judged to be crying excessively and 96 NHS Health Visitors (HVs). Parental use and parents’ and HVs’ ratings of the Surviving Crying materials were measured. Results: Thirty four parents reported using the website, 24 the printed booklet and 24 the CBT sessions. Parents mostly accessed the website on mobile phones or tablets and use was substantial. All the parents and almost all HVs who provided data judged the materials to be helpful for parents and suitable for NHS use. If offered a waiting list control group, 85% of parents said they would have been willing to take part in a full RCT evaluation of the Surviving Crying package. Discussion and conclusions: The findings identify the need for materials to support parents of excessively crying babies within national health services in the UK. The Surviving Crying support package appears suitable for this purpose and a full community-level RCT of the package is feasible and likely to be worthwhile. Limitations to the study and barriers to delivery of the services were identified, indicating improvements needed in future research.
    • The eye of the beholder

      Bird, Jamie; University of Derby (Routledge, 2019-07-30)
      This chapter addresses issues that arose from being a male researcher and art therapist conducting arts-based research with women who had experienced domestic violence and abuse. Engaging in such research required that I critically engage with issues of gender within the context of conducting research. Through the lens of one particular vignette taken from a larger study, this paper will engage with broader ideas about gender and the conducting of arts-based research and art therapy. Whilst this chapter will have relevance for those men engaged in research or art therapy that involves aspects of domestic violence and abuse, it will also have relevance to those who are interested in wider discussions to be had about the influence of gender upon relationships within therapy and research. This has always been a topic worthy of sustained investigation, but the contemporary emergence within public discourse about abuses of male privilege within various professions make this an especially important subject to attend to. Drawing upon the work of Sandra Harding (1998, 2004), Jeff Hearn (1998) and Ann Murphy (2012), I will explore how feminist standpoint theory and reflexivity helped to manage, and make sense of, the concerns and anxieties that arose whilst conducting research into violence against women. Anxieties about research becoming therapy merged with anxieties about being a male researcher working with women who had experienced domestic violence and abuse. Whilst this chapter does not aim to outline in depth what an arts-based research methodology looks like within the context of studying domestic violence and abuse, it begins by describing the methodology in enough detail to provide a context within which the nature of the research process can be appreciated. The findings of the research are presented in sufficient detail to allow the overall findings of the research to be understood. There then follows examples of words and images produced by one woman, who used her participation as a way of ensuring that she was seen clearly by myself and by other research participants. This aspect of wanting to be seen became an embodiment of the need to acknowledge my own standpoint and reflexive position as a male researcher. Evaluative comments about participation made by other women are used to show how vulnerability was a feature of taking part in this research for both participants and for me. The concept of vulnerability is examined with reference made to ideas about imagination and empathy from the perspective of feminist philosophy, which in turn helps to shape a discussion about the place of gender within research, art therapy, and the boundary between them. In keeping with the principles of feminist standpoint theory and strong objectivity, as set forth by Harding (1998), this chapter is written from a first-person perspective.
    • Singing as an adjunct therapy for children and adults with cystic fibrosis.

      Irons, J. Yoon; Petocz, Peter; Kenny, Dianna T; Chang, Ann B.; University of Derby (2019-07-12)
      Cystic fibrosis is a genetically inherited, life‐threatening condition that affects major organs. The management of cystic fibrosis involves a multi‐faceted daily treatment regimen that includes airway clearance techniques, pancreatic enzymes and other medications. Previous studies have found that compliance with this intensive treatment is poor, especially among adolescents. Because of both the nature and consequences of the illness and the relentless demands of the treatment, many individuals with cystic fibrosis have a poor quality of life. Anecdotal reports suggest that singing may provide both appropriate exercise for the whole respiratory system and a means of emotional expression which may enhance quality of life. This is an update of a previously published review. To evaluate the effects of singing as an adjunct therapy to standard treatment on the quality of life, morbidity, respiratory muscle strength and pulmonary function of children and adults with cystic fibrosis. We searched the Group's Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Date of latest search: 07 January 2019. We also searched major allied complementary data bases, and clinical trial registers. Additionally, we hand searched relevant conference proceedings and journals. Date of latest search: 28 March 2019. Randomised controlled trials in which singing (as an adjunct intervention) is compared with either a control intervention (for example, playing computer games or doing craft activities) or no singing in people with cystic fibrosis. Results of searches were reviewed against pre‐determined criteria for inclusion. Only one eligible trial was available for analysis. Since only one small study (n = 40) was included, no meta‐analysis could be performed. The included randomised controlled study was of parallel design and undertaken at two paediatric hospitals in Australia. The study evaluated the effects of a singing program on the quality of life and respiratory muscle strength of hospitalised children with cystic fibrosis (mean age 11.6 years, 35% male). While the singing group received eight individual singing sessions, the control group participated in preferred recreational activities, such as playing computer games or watching movies. This study was limited by a small sample size (51 participants) and a high drop‐out rate (21%). There were no differences between the groups at either post‐intervention or follow‐up; although by the end of treatment there were some improvements in some of the domains of the quality of life questionnaire Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire‐Revised (e.g. emotional, social and vitality domains) for both singing and control groups. For the respiratory muscle strength indices, maximal expiratory pressure at follow‐up (six to eight weeks post‐intervention) was higher in the singing group, mean difference 25.80 (95% confidence interval 5.94 to 45.66). There was no difference between groups for any of the other respiratory function parameters (maximal inspiratory pressure, spirometry) at either post‐intervention or follow‐up. No adverse effects were observed in the singing group; adverse events for the control group were not reported in the paper. There is insufficient evidence to determine the effects of singing on quality of life or on the respiratory parameters in people with cystic fibrosis. However, there is growing interest in non‐medical treatments for cystic fibrosis and researchers may wish to investigate the impact of this inexpensive therapy on respiratory function and psychosocial well‐being further in the future.
    • An agenda for best practice research on group singing, health, and well-being

      Dingle, Genevieve A.; Clift, Stephen; Finn, Saoirse; Gilbert, Rebekah; Groarke, Jenny M; Irons, J. Yoon; Jones-Bartoli, Alice; Lamont, Alexandra; Launay, Jacques; Martin, Eleanor S; et al. (Sage, 2019-07-10)
      Research on choirs and other forms of group singing has been conducted for several decades and there has been a recent focus on the potential health and wellbeing benefits, particularly in amateur singers. Experimental, quantitative and qualitative studies show evidence of a range of biopsychosocial and wellbeing benefits to singers; however, there are many challenges to rigour and replicability. To support the advances of research into group singing, the authors met and discussed theoretical and methodological issues to be addressed in future studies. The authors are from five countries and represent the following disciplinary perspectives: music psychology, music therapy, community music, clinical psychology, educational and developmental psychology, evolutionary psychology, health psychology, social psychology, and public health. This paper summarises our collective thoughts in relation to the priority questions for future group singing research, theoretical frameworks, potential solutions for design and ethical challenges, quantitative measures, qualitative methods, and whether there is scope for a benchmarking set of measures across singing projects. With eight key recommendations, the paper sets an agenda for best practice research on group singing.
    • Evaluating clinical placements in Saudi Arabia with the CLES+T scale

      Anthony, Denis; Al-Anazi, Norah; Alosaimi, Dalyal; Pandaan, Isabelita; Dyson, Sue; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2019-07-09)
      The clinical learning environment and supervision (CLES) tool has been enhanced with an additional sub-scale for measuring the quality of nurse teacher’s involvement to form the CLES+T scale. It has been widely used in many countries to evaluate clinical placements. Here we report data from Saudi Arabia. The CLES+T was employed to measure satisfaction among student nurses concerning their clinical learning environment. Linear regression was used to determine relationships of various variables to the outcomes of total CLES+T score and those of its subscales. Students were generally satisfied with their placements. For female students the number of visits of the nurse tutor was positively associated with most subscales and with the total score. For males, who had fewer visits of nurse tutor, there was no such association. Nurse tutor visits are positive in terms of clinical placement evaluation by female student nurses. Saudi nursing students are generally similar to students in other international studies in terms of their appraisal of clinical placements.
    • Cochrane systematic review singing for people with parkinson’s: preliminary findings

      Irons, J. Yoon; coren, Esther; Young, Megan K; Gschwandtner, Manfred; Stewart, Donald E; Mellick, George D; Health and Social Care Research Centre, University of Derby (University of Derby, 2019-06-05)
      This is a Conference (5th World Parkinson's Congress) poster based on the on-going Cochrane Systematic review on the effects of singing for people with Parkinson's.
    • A group singing program improves quality of life: An international study

      Irons, J. Yoon; Hancox, Grenville; Vella-Burrows, Trish; Han, E-Y; Chong, H-J; Sheffield, David; Stewart, Donald E; Health and Social Care Research Centre, University of Derby (University of Derby, 2019-06-05)
      People with Parkinson’s (PwPs) may experience stigma, isolation, stress and anxiety due to the chronic nature of Parkinson’s. Complementary therapies, including singing, have been reported to impact positively on quality of life (QoL) in PwPs. This paper reports on an international trial of Sing to Beat Parkinson’s®, a community group singing program, involving PwPs from Australia, the UK, and South Korea on QoL and mental well-being. PwPs (N=95; mean age=70.26; male 45%) participated in a standardized 6-month weekly group singing program, which included breathing exercises, vocal warm-ups and preferred song singing. PDQ39 and modified DASS21 were administered at baseline and follow-up to assess QoL and mental well-being, respectively. MANOVA and ANOVAs were performed with significance set as p<.05. MANOVA showed statistically significant multivariate effects of Time, Country, Time by Country and Time by Gender interactions on QoL. Follow-up univariate ANOVAs revealed main effects of Time on Stigma and Social Support domains of QoL; both improved. Further, MANOVA revealed a multivariate effect of Time on mental well-being; anxiety and stress significantly decreased from pre-test to post-test. This first international singing study with PwPs demonstrated that group singing enhanced some aspects of quality of life and mental well-being. Participating in a weekly group singing program for a 6-month period impacted positively on social support, and feeling stigmatized, as well as reductions in anxiety and stress. The findings are encouraging and warrant further research using more robust designs that include comparator groups.
    • Online research in health

      Anthony, Denis; University of Derby (Sage, 2019-04-30)
      This chapter shows some of the ways to use online resources in health research. It looks not only at internet-based data sources but also more widely at some of the clinical databases to illustrate the advantages and limitations of using these for research. In general, using internet-based resources can be make health research quicker and less labour intensive with rapid access to data and references. It can also provide tools to carry out data collection and analysis. However, researchers may have to learn how to use the tools available and not all health data are available. Some clinical databases are closed systems for reasons of patient confidentiality. These systems may be web-based but are on intranets rather than on the public internet with wider access – such as those that are part of hospital information and support systems (HISS).
    • Domestic violence and suicide attempt among married women: A case‐control study

      Rahmani, F; Salmasi, S; Rahmani, F; Bird, J; ASghari, E; Robai, N; Asghari Jafarabadi, M; Gholizadeh, L; University of Derby (Wiley, 2019-04-23)
      The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of domestic violence‐related factors on suicide attempt in married women. Suicide is a global public health concern that poses significant burden on individuals, families and communities. There is limited research on factors predicting suicide attempt in women. A retrospective case‐control design was adopted. Using a convenience sampling method, 610 participants, admitted to a teaching referral hospital in Northwest of XXX, were recruited to the study and assigned to case or control groups based on whether or not they had attempted suicide. The participants in two groups were matched in the terms of important demographic characteristics. Domestic violence‐related factors were considered as independent variables and suicide attempt as dependent variable. Descriptive statistics, simple and multivariate logistic regression analysis were used to analyze the data. Odd ratios (OR) of domestic violence related factors were compared between the groups. We used STROBE checklist as an EQUATOR in this study. The mean age of participants in the case and control groups was 28.4 years and 29.45 years, respectively. The infidelity was the strongest predictor of suicide attempt in women (OR 44.57, 95%CI 6.08‐326. 63, p<0.001), followed by being threatened to physical assault by husband (OR 37.01, 95%CI 11.54‐118.67, p<0.001), jealousy of husband (OR 23.46, 95%CI 11.63‐47.30, p<0.001), and previous attempts to divorce (OR 16.55, 95%CI 5.91‐46.31, p<0.001). Suicide attempt was significantly lower in women who reported a sense of peace in life or lived with their mother or father‐in‐law (p<0.001). To reduce the risk of suicide in women, violence against women should be condemned and appropriate prevention measures be taken by health professionals. Recognizing risk, assessment and referral of victims of domestic violence should be an integral part of health care systems.
    • 'I felt like I was doing something wrong': A qualitative exploration of mothers' experiences of breastfeeding

      Jackson, Jessica; Hallam, Jenny; University of Derby (MAG, 2019-04-18)
      Despite its multiple health benefits, rates of breastfeeding to 2 years and beyond remain low in the UK. This qualitative study explored the experiences of support provided by health professionals to mothers breastfeeding beyond infancy. A key finding of the study was that health services are effective at supporting breastfeeding in the postnatal period, but that beyond the 1-year review the focus shifts to rapid weaning. A new approach to support breastfeeding continuation alongside the introduction of complementary foods is needed in line with professional guidance and recommendations. As critical reflective practitioners, health visitors are ideally placed to support and educate women about the wider social complexities of breastfeeding. However, health service commissioners need to recognise the importance of investment in the profession to enable health visitors to use their skills fully.
    • Social media: blurred lines between personal and professional behaviour

      Jackson, Jessica; University of Derby (Medical Education Solutions, 2019-04-17)
      It is now over twenty years since the birth of social media and, according to Statista, the number of people engaged in these types of online networking platforms has reached over 39 million in the UK alone. These users include a generation who have grown up with such fast social interactions in a virtual world of posts for ‘likes’, ‘friends’ and ‘followers’. These young adults’ desire to engage in social media is often intertwined with their everyday lives.
    • A Statutory youth service proposal: Multi-professionally located to build on the past yet equipped for the future

      Howell, T.J.; Robinson, N.; University of Derby (Youth and Policy, 2019-04-15)
      Austerity at its worst has left young people socially isolated, mentally ill and disempowered by their adult peers. The claim to making youth work a protected statutory service is growing momentum. The Civil Society Strategy praises the transformational impact of youth work on working with the most disadvantaged young people. However, the Youth Violence Commission goes one step further suggesting a statutory youth service is an essential preventative measure to tackle youth violence and gangs. With such momentum and cross-party support, sufficient thought must be given to what form a statutory youth service could take to build on existing infrastructure, rather than propose a rebuilding programme on the scale of Albemarle, maybe repurposing the 1000 closed Sure Start buildings could be the answer. This paper proposes a statutory youth service based on embedding lifelong informal education to avoid gaps in transition between life stages and public services, extending the reach of the Sure Start initiative through family community hubs. This offer would be a process curriculum with political education and praxis at its heart. It would be OFSTED inspected, measuring the quality of inputs rather than outputs with local organisation determined by local youth panels making decisions on local priorities.
    • The determination of finger flexor critical force in rock climbers

      Giles, David; Chidley, Joe;; Taylor, Nicola; Torr, Ollie; Hadley, Josh; Randall, Tom; Fryer, Simon; University of Derby (Human Kinetics, 2019-04)
      Purpose: To determine if the mathematical model used for the estimation of critical force (CF) and the energy store component W’ is applicable to intermittent isometric muscle actions of the finger flexors of rock climbers, using a multi-session test. As a secondary aim, the agreement of estimates of CF and W’ from a single-session test were also determined. The CF was defined as the slope coefficient and W’ the intercept of the linear relationship between total “isometric work” (Wlim) and time to exhaustion (Tlim). Methods: Subjects performed three (separated by either 20 m or >24 h) tests to failure using intermittent isometric finger flexor contractions at 45, 60 and 80% of their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Results: Force plotted against Tlim displayed a hyperbolic relationship, correlation coefficients of the parameter estimates from the work–time CF model were consistently very high (R2 > 0.94). Climbers mean CF was 425.7 ± 82.8 N (41.0 ± 6.2% MVC) and W’ 30882 ± 11820 N·s. Good agreement was found between the single and multi-session protocol for CF (ICC(3,1) = 0.900, 95% Confidence Interval [CI95%] 0.616 – 0.979), but not for W’ (ICC(3,1) = 0.768, CI95% 0.190 – 0.949). Conclusions: The results demonstrated the sensitivity of a simple test for the determination of CF and W’, using equipment readily available in most climbing gyms. While further work is still necessary, the test of CF described is of value for understanding exercise tolerance and determine optimal training prescription to monitor improvements the performance of the finger flexors.
    • Parents’ experiences of having an excessively crying baby and implications for support services

      Garratt, Rosemary; Bamber, Deborah; Powell, Charlotte; Long, Jaqui; Brown, Jayne; Turney, Nicy; Chessman, Jo; Dyson, Sue; St James-Roberts, Ian; De Montfort University; et al. (Mark Allen Group (MAGonline), 2019-03-20)
      Evidence suggests that around 20% of healthy babies cry for long periods without apparent reason, causing significant distress to parents and a range of adverse outcomes. This study explored parents’ experiences of having an excessively crying baby and their suggestions for improved NHS support. Focus groups and interviews with 20 parents identified three key themes: disrupted expectations and experiences of parenthood; stigma and social isolation; seeking support and validation of experience. Parents experienced shock, anxiety and a sense of failure, leading to self-imposed isolation and a reluctance to seek help. Other people’s reactions sometimes reinforced their feelings. Parents need more support, including from health professionals, to cope with excessive crying, and recommendations for this support are given.
    • Singing for people with Parkinson's disease

      Irons, J. Yoon; coren, Esther; Young, Megan K; Stewart, Donald E; Gschwandtner, Manfred; Mellick, George D; Health and Social Care Research Centre, University of Derby; Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre, Griffith University, Australia (Cochrane, 2019-02-26)
      To compare the efficacy and effectiveness of singing interventions with non‐singing intervention or usual care on QoL, wellbeing, and speech and communication among people with PD. We will assess the QoL and the physical, psychological, and social health and wellbeing of people with PD who receive a singing intervention, compared to non‐singing intervention or usual care.
    • Prevalence of pressure ulcers in long term care: A global review.

      Anthony, Denis Martin; Alosoumi, Dalyal; Safari, Reza; University of Derby (Mark Allen Healthcare, 2019)
      To identify the prevalence and incidence of pressure ulcers in people with long term conditions resident in care homes or nursing homes . We followed the PRISMA guideline for systematic reviews however due to funding constraints we do not claim this review to be systematic but it is a narrative review informed by PRISMA. We searched Embase, Medline and CINHAL for observational studies reporting incidence or prevalence data. Data reported relevant head to toe examination of the pressure ulcer in residence of care or nursing homes. Internat and external validity of the included studies were assessed using the checklist devised by Hoy et al (2012). Seventeen studies met the inclusion criteria an included in the study. Some studies gave a full breakdown by grade, some only gave overall figures and some excluded grade I pressure ulcers. However within those constraints certain patterns are clear. Prevalence rates varied from 3.4% to 32.4% and large differences in prevalence in different countries was not explained by methodological differences. While some countries such as Germany, the Netherlands and the USA had robust data some countries such as the UK had none. Pressure ulcers are a common problem in long term care. However there are substantial differences between countries and many countries have no published data.
    • Creative ageing: the social policy challenge.

      Hogan, Susan; Bradfield, E.; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-11-27)
      By 2071, the number of people over 65 could double to nearly 21.3 million, while the number of people aged 80 and over could more than treble to 9.5 million. Over the next 30 years, the number of people with dementia in the UK could double to 1.4 million. The current policy landscape marks a shift in thinking, away from ‘deficit’ models of later life towards a paradigm shift which ‘allows people to realise their potential for physical, social, and mental wellbeing throughout the life-course and to participate in society’ (World Health Organisation 2002, p. 3). Where previous models of later-life care have focused on supporting acute illness in older age, health-care systems are now forced to find ways to support individuals to take responsibility for their own health within their own communities. In 2008, the New Economics Foundation (NEF) was commissioned by the UK Government’s Foresight Project on Mental Capital and Wellbeing to review the interdisciplinary work of more than 400 researchers from across the world. The aim was to identify a set of evidencebased actions to improve wellbeing which individuals could be encouraged to build into their daily lives. This was distilled down to the Five Ways to Wellbeing, which is now a major driver of health policy in the UK. They are: connect, be active, take notice, keep learning, give This chapter will look at how different types of creativity in older age can meet the social policy recommendations embodied within the Five Ways to Wellbeing with specific detailed examples. The chapter will also relate this to the ongoing work on wellbeing, post-2008. Though some commentators have suggested this formulation is absurdly reductive, Five Ways to Wellbeing has had considerable success in being accessible to a wide-range of audiences and easy to embed in policy statements and to communicate to community-based organisational teams. Following a brief introduction to the British policy context, this chapter looks at ways in which Five Ways to Wellbeing can be realised through arts engagement providing detailed examples of arts practices that help sustain a creative older age.
    • The body of work as a legitimate form of independent scholarship.

      Bird, Jamie; Stephanou, Mary; Wellen, Allessandar; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-10-25)
      This chapter will outline key principles that underpin the use of creativity within final-year projects of undergraduate and postgraduate programmes. It will set forth a rational for directing students towards using a particular form of arts-based research that aids critical thinking and reflexivity whilst engaging in art practice. The programmes referenced in this chapter are delivered at the University of Derby. The undergraduate programme – Creative Expressive Therapies – is outlined in detail within other chapters of this book. The post-graduate programmes include Art Therapy, Dramatherapy and Dance and Movement Psychotherapy. Those postgraduate programmes are regulated by various professional bodies and lead to students being able to practice in their chosen field. What those programmes share is the placing of creativity, art-making and performance at the heart of their pedagogic philosophy and practice. What they also share is a focus upon the therapeutic use of creativity and the therapeutic use of self. Whilst the undergraduate programmes are positioned within an arts in health and arts in education paradigm, the post-graduate programmes are broadly psychotherapeutic in their approach to creativity and therapeutic relationships. Either way, a better understanding of the role of the therapeutic use of creativity and self is enhanced by embedding both into the process of independent scholarship.
    • Fatigue interventions in long term, physical health conditions: a scoping review of systematic reviews.

      Hulme, Katrin; Safari, Reza; Thomas, Sarah; Mercer, Tom; White, Claire; Van der Linden, Marietta; Moss-Morris, Rona; University of Derby; King’s College London; Staffordshire University; et al. (PLOS, 2018-10-12)
      Fatigue is prominent across many long term physical health conditions. This scoping review aimed to map the fatigue intervention literature, to ascertain if certain interventions may be effective across conditions, and if novel interventions tested in specific long term conditions may be promising for other conditions.