• Competencies and frameworks in interprofessional education: A comparative analysis

      Thistlethwaite, Jill; Forman, Dawn; Matthews, Lynda; Rogers, Gary; Steketee, Carole; Yassine, Tagrid; University of Derby (Wolters Kluwer, 2014-06)
      Health professionals need preparation and support to work in collaborative practice teams, a requirement brought about by an aging population and increases in chronic and complex diseases. Therefore, health professions education has seen the introduction of interprofessional education (IPE) competency frameworks to provide a common lens through which disciplines can understand, describe, and implement team-based practices. Whilst an admirable aim, often this has resulted in more confusion with the introduction of varying definitions about similar constructs, particularly in relation to what IPE actually means.The authors explore the nature of the terms competency and framework, while critically appraising the concept of competency frameworks and competency-based education. They distinguish between competencies for health professions that are profession specific, those that are generic, and those that may be achieved only through IPE. Four IPE frameworks are compared to consider their similarities and differences, which ultimately influence how IPE is implemented. They are the Interprofessional Capability Framework (United Kingdom), the National Interprofessional Competency Framework (Canada), the Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice (United States), and the Curtin University Interprofessional Capability Framework (Australia).The authors highlight the need for further discussion about establishing a common language, strengthening ways in which academic environments work with practice environments, and improving the assessment of interprofessional competencies and teamwork, including the development of assessment tools for collaborative practice. They also argue that for IPE frameworks to be genuinely useful, they need to augment existing curricula by emphasizing outcomes that might be attained only through interprofessional activity
    • Curriculum renewal for interprofessional education in health

      Dunston, Roger; Forman, Dawn; Rogers, Gary; Thistlethwaite, Jill; Yassine, Tagrid; Hager, Jane; Manidis, Maria; Rossiter, Chris; Curtin University (Office for Learning and Teaching Australia, 2014-01)
      In this preface we comment on four matters that we think bode well for the future of interprofessional education in Australia. First, there is a growing articulation, nationally and globally, as to the importance of interprofessional education and its contribution to the development of interprofessional and collaborative health practices. These practices are increasingly recognised as central to delivering effective, efficient, safe and sustainable health services. Second, there is a rapidly growing interest and institutional engagement with interprofessional education as part of pre-registration health professional education. This has changed substantially in recent years. Whilst beyond the scope of our current studies, the need for similar developments in continuing professional development (CPD) for health professionals was a consistent topic in our stakeholder consultations. Third, we observe what might be termed a threshold effect occurring in the area of interprofessional education. Projects that address matters relating to IPE are now far more numerous, visible and discussed in terms of their aggregate outcomes. The impact of this momentum is visible across the higher education sector. Finally, we believe that effective collaboration is a critical mediating process through which the rich resources of disciplinary knowledge and capability are joined to add value to existing health service provision. We trust the conceptual and practical contributions and resources presented and discussed in this report contribute to these developments.
    • Interprofessional health education in Australia: Three research projects informing curriculum renewal and development

      Steketee, Carole; Forman, Dawn; Dunston, Roger; Yassine, Tagrid; Matthews, Lynda; Saunders, Rosemary; Nicol, Pam; Alliex, Selma; University of Derby; Curtin University (Elsevier, 2014-05)
      Purpose This paper reports on three interrelated Australian studies that provide a nationally coherent and evidence-informed approach to interprofessional education (IPE). Based on findings from previous studies that IPE tends to be marginalized in mainstream health curriculum, the three studies aspired to produce a range of resources that would guide the sustainable implementation of IPE across the Australian higher education sector. Method Nine national universities, two peak industry bodies and a non-government organization constituted the study team. Data were gathered via a mixture of stakeholder consultations, surveys and interviews and analyzed using quantitative and qualitative methods. Results & Conclusion An important outcome was a curriculum renewal framework which has been used to explore the implications of the study's findings on Australian nursing. While the findings are pertinent to all health professions, nursing is well placed to take a leading role in establishing IPE as a central element of health professional education.