• Development of NURSE education in Saudi Arabia, Jordan and Ghana: From undergraduate to doctoral programmes

      Anthony, Denis; Alosaimi, Dalyal; Dyson, Sue E.; Saleh, Mohammad; Korsah, Kwadwo; University of Derby; King Saud University, Saudi Arabia; University of Ghana, Ghana; University of Jordan, Jordan (Elseiver, 2020-08-18)
      Doctoral programmes in nursing have a long history in the US where traditional research based PhDs and more clinically based doctoral programmes are common. In the rest of the world PhDs are better accepted though professional doctorates with a thesis component are common in the UK. In countries with newly established or planned doctoral programmes in nursing the research PhD seems the degree of choice. Here we discuss developments in Jordan, Saudi Arabia and Ghana. This study used official documents, strategic plans, curriculum developments and other documentary evidence from Saudi Arabia, Jordan and Ghana. We compared doctoral programmes and development with other countries by reference to the literature. We offer the example of public health and non-communicable diseases in particular as one area where doctorally trained nurses applying international standards in collaboration internationally may be of benefit.
    • Evaluating clinical placements in Saudi Arabia with the CLES+T scale

      Anthony, Denis; Al-Anazi, Norah; Alosaimi, Dalyal; Pandaan, Isabelita; Dyson, Sue E.; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2019-07-09)
      The clinical learning environment and supervision (CLES) tool has been enhanced with an additional sub-scale for measuring the quality of nurse teacher’s involvement to form the CLES+T scale. It has been widely used in many countries to evaluate clinical placements. Here we report data from Saudi Arabia. The CLES+T was employed to measure satisfaction among student nurses concerning their clinical learning environment. Linear regression was used to determine relationships of various variables to the outcomes of total CLES+T score and those of its subscales. Students were generally satisfied with their placements. For female students the number of visits of the nurse tutor was positively associated with most subscales and with the total score. For males, who had fewer visits of nurse tutor, there was no such association. Nurse tutor visits are positive in terms of clinical placement evaluation by female student nurses. Saudi nursing students are generally similar to students in other international studies in terms of their appraisal of clinical placements.
    • Prevalence of pressure ulcers in Africa: A systematic review and meta-analysis

      Anthony, Denis; Alosaimi, Dalyal; Korsah, Kwadwo; Safari, Reza; Shiferaw, Wondimeneh Shibabaw; University of Derby; College of Nursing, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia; Institute of Medicine and College of Health Sciences, Debre Berhan University, Ethiopia; School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Ghana, Ghana (Elsevier, 2021-10-27)
      A recent global review of pressure ulcers contained no studies from Africa. To identify the prevalence and incidence of pressure ulcers in Africa. Bibliographic databases, African specific databases, grey literature. Studies with prevalence or incidence data of pressure ulcers from Africa since the year 2000. Any age, including children, in any setting, specifically including hospital patients from any clinical area but not restricted to hospital settings. Holy score for bias, Joanna Briggs Institute Critical Appraisal Instrument. We followed the PRISMA guideline for systematic reviews. We searched Embase, Medline, Scopus, CINHAL, Google Scholar, specialist African databases and grey literature for studies reporting incidence or prevalence data. Nineteen studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in the study. Point prevalence rates varied from 3.4% to 18.6% for medical/surgical and other general hospital units with a pooled prevalence of 11%, for grades II-IV 5%. For spinal injury units the pooled prevalence was 44%. Restricted to English, French and Arabic. Prevalence of pressure ulcers in Africa reported here is similar to figures from a recent review of prevalence in Europe and two recent global reviews of hospitalised patients. Prevalence of pressure ulcers in spinal cord injury patients is similar to figures from a review of developing countries. The reporting of prevalence is lacking in detail in some studies. Studies using an observational design employing physical examination of patients showed higher prevalence than those relying on other methods such as medical notes or databases. Further prevalence and incidence studies are needed in Africa. Reporting of such studies should ensure items in the “Checklist for Prevalence Studies” from Joanna Briggs Institute (or similar well regarded resources) are addressed and the PICOS model and PRISMA guidelines are employed. Systematic review registration number. Prospero registration number CRD42020180093