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dc.contributor.authorHill, Adam J.
dc.contributor.authorLewis, Simon P.
dc.contributor.authorHawksford, Malcolm O. J.
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-24T09:20:48Z
dc.date.available2013-04-24T09:20:48Z
dc.date.issued2012-11
dc.identifier.citationProc. Institute of Acoustics Conference on Reproduced Sound 2012en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/283752
dc.description.abstractLow-frequency sound source localization generates considerable amount of disagreement between audio/acoustics researchers, with some arguing that below a certain frequency humans cannot localize a source with others insisting that in certain cases localization is possible, even down to the lowest audible of frequencies. Nearly all previous work in this area depends on subjective evaluations to formulate theorems for low-frequency localization. This, of course, opens the argument of data reliability, a critical factor that may go some way to explain the reported ambiguities with regard to low-frequency localization. The resulting proposal stipulates that low-frequency source localization is highly dependent on room dimensions, source/listener location and absorptive properties. In some cases, a source can be accurately localized down to the lowest audible of frequencies, while in other situations it cannot. This is relevant as the standard procedure in live sound reinforcement, cinema sound and home-theater surround sound is to have a single mono channel for the low-frequency content, based on the assumption that human’s cannot determine direction in this band. This work takes the first steps towards showing that this may not be a universally valid simplification and that certain sound reproduction systems may actually benefit from directional low-frequency content.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherInstitute of Acousticsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ioa.org.uk/uploads/event-documents/RS2012%20programme.pdfen
dc.subjectAcousticsen
dc.subjectLocalizationen
dc.subjectSound reproductionen
dc.subjectMultichannel sounden
dc.subjectAudio engineeringen
dc.titleTowards a generalized theory of low-frequency sound source localizationen
dc.typePreprinten
dc.typeMeetings and Proceedingsen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Essexen
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T13:00:06Z
html.description.abstractLow-frequency sound source localization generates considerable amount of disagreement between audio/acoustics researchers, with some arguing that below a certain frequency humans cannot localize a source with others insisting that in certain cases localization is possible, even down to the lowest audible of frequencies. Nearly all previous work in this area depends on subjective evaluations to formulate theorems for low-frequency localization. This, of course, opens the argument of data reliability, a critical factor that may go some way to explain the reported ambiguities with regard to low-frequency localization. The resulting proposal stipulates that low-frequency source localization is highly dependent on room dimensions, source/listener location and absorptive properties. In some cases, a source can be accurately localized down to the lowest audible of frequencies, while in other situations it cannot. This is relevant as the standard procedure in live sound reinforcement, cinema sound and home-theater surround sound is to have a single mono channel for the low-frequency content, based on the assumption that human’s cannot determine direction in this band. This work takes the first steps towards showing that this may not be a universally valid simplification and that certain sound reproduction systems may actually benefit from directional low-frequency content.


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