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dc.contributor.authorHayes, Dennis
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-17T13:16:47Z
dc.date.available2012-09-17T13:16:47Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.citationAcademic freedom and the diminished subject 2009, 57 (2):127 British Journal of Educational Studiesen
dc.identifier.issn0007-1005
dc.identifier.issn1467-8527
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1467-8527.2009.00432.x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/244312
dc.descriptionDiscussions about freedom of speech and academic freedom today are about the limits to those freedoms. However, these discussions take place mostly in the higher education trade press and do not receive any serious attention from academics and educationalists. In this paper several key arguments for limiting academic freedom are identified, examined and placed in an historical context.That contextualisation shows that with the disappearance of social and political struggles to extend freedom in society there has come a narrowing of academic life and a new and impoverished concept of ‘academic freedom’ for a diminished idea of the human subject, of humanity and of human potentialen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1467-8527.2009.00432.xen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to British Journal of Educational Studiesen
dc.subjectAcademic freedomen
dc.subjectFree speechen
dc.subjectDiminished subjecten
dc.titleAcademic freedom and the diminished subjecten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Educational Studiesen


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