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dc.contributor.authorPates, John
dc.contributor.authorOliver, Rachael
dc.contributor.authorMaynard, Ian
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-10T12:30:47Z
dc.date.available2012-07-10T12:30:47Z
dc.date.issued2001
dc.identifier.citationThe Effects of Hypnosis on Flow States and Golf-Putting Performance 2001, 13 (4):341 Journal of Applied Sport Psychologyen
dc.identifier.issn1041-3200
dc.identifier.issn1533-1571
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/104132001753226238
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the effects of hypnosis on flow states and golf-putting performance in 5 competitive players. The investigation utilized an ideographic singlesubject multiple baseline across subjects design combined with a procedure that monitors the internal experience of the participants (Wollman, 1986). The method of intervention utilized in this study involved hypnotic induction, hypnotic regression, and trigger control procedures. The results indicated that all 5 participants increased both their mean golf putting performance and their mean flow scores from baseline to intervention. There were no overlapping data points between the baseline and intervention for either performance or flow state. Additionally, each participant indicated that they had felt the intervention was useful in keeping them relaxed, confident, and focused. Three of the golfers also reported experiencing reduced concerns about performing and more control over their putting stroke.
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/104132001753226238en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Applied Sport Psychologyen
dc.titleThe effects of hypnosis on flow states and golf-putting performance
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSheffield Hallam Universityen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Applied Sport Psychologyen
html.description.abstractThis study examined the effects of hypnosis on flow states and golf-putting performance in 5 competitive players. The investigation utilized an ideographic singlesubject multiple baseline across subjects design combined with a procedure that monitors the internal experience of the participants (Wollman, 1986). The method of intervention utilized in this study involved hypnotic induction, hypnotic regression, and trigger control procedures. The results indicated that all 5 participants increased both their mean golf putting performance and their mean flow scores from baseline to intervention. There were no overlapping data points between the baseline and intervention for either performance or flow state. Additionally, each participant indicated that they had felt the intervention was useful in keeping them relaxed, confident, and focused. Three of the golfers also reported experiencing reduced concerns about performing and more control over their putting stroke.


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