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dc.contributor.authorAbbott, Dina
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-29T13:35:59Z
dc.date.available2012-05-29T13:35:59Z
dc.date.issued2012-05-29
dc.identifier.citationEnhancing online climate change education: distance and conventional university collaboration for a Master's curriculum 2012, 6 (1):78 International Journal of Innovation and Sustainable Developmenten
dc.identifier.issn1740-8822
dc.identifier.issn1740-8830
dc.identifier.doi10.1504/IJISD.2012.046055
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/226431
dc.descriptionSee also a longer version: ‘Expanding Citizen and Practitioner Engagement with the Climate Change Challenge Through Collaborative Masters Curriculum, Open Educational Resources, E-learning Communities and Virtual Mobility’, presented at a conference of European Association of Distance Teaching Universities (EDTU), Zermatt, Switzerland, September 2010 (www.eadtu.nl/.../Accepted%20Presentations%20for%20Newsletter.pd).en
dc.description.abstractThis paper analyses the different ways in which both distance and conventional universities engage with learning and teaching. It argues that rather than seeing their roles as institutionally compartmentalised, there is much benefit in delivering online education through an institutional collaboration which develops synergies with a potential to contribute to citizen and professional practitioner empowerment, in this case, for debates about climate change. The example the paper draws on is that of a European Region Action Scheme for the Mobility of University Students (Erasmus) project ‘The Lived experience of climate change (LECH-e): interdisciplinary e-module development and virtual mobility’. The project brings together five distance and three conventional universities across six EU countries, plus the European Association of Distance Teaching Universities (EADTU), to create a Master’s curriculum in the area of climate change. It argues that universities across Europe have complementary strengths, both in terms of their disciplinary expertise and the ways in which they engage with students. Understanding the complex, real-world challenge of climate change requires a holistic approach which draws on these complementary strengths through collaborative work. Keywords: conventional universities; distance-learning universities; Master’s curriculum in climate change; collaboration.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.inderscience.com/link.php?id=46055en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to International Journal of Innovation and Sustainable Developmenten
dc.subjectConventional universitiesen
dc.subjectDistance-learning universities
dc.subjectMaster's curriculum in climate change
dc.subjectCollaboration
dc.titleEnhancing online climate change education: distance and conventional university collaboration for a Master's curriculumen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Innovation and Sustainable Developmenten
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T12:52:10Z
html.description.abstractThis paper analyses the different ways in which both distance and conventional universities engage with learning and teaching. It argues that rather than seeing their roles as institutionally compartmentalised, there is much benefit in delivering online education through an institutional collaboration which develops synergies with a potential to contribute to citizen and professional practitioner empowerment, in this case, for debates about climate change. The example the paper draws on is that of a European Region Action Scheme for the Mobility of University Students (Erasmus) project ‘The Lived experience of climate change (LECH-e): interdisciplinary e-module development and virtual mobility’. The project brings together five distance and three conventional universities across six EU countries, plus the European Association of Distance Teaching Universities (EADTU), to create a Master’s curriculum in the area of climate change. It argues that universities across Europe have complementary strengths, both in terms of their disciplinary expertise and the ways in which they engage with students. Understanding the complex, real-world challenge of climate change requires a holistic approach which draws on these complementary strengths through collaborative work. Keywords: conventional universities; distance-learning universities; Master’s curriculum in climate change; collaboration.


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