• Analysis, modeling and wide-area spatiotemporal control of low-frequency sound reproduction

      Hill, Adam J.; University of Essex (University of Essex, 2012-01)
      This research aims to develop a low-frequency response control methodology capable of delivering a consistent spectral and temporal response over a wide listening area. Low-frequency room acoustics are naturally plagued by room-modes, a result of standing waves at frequencies with wavelengths that are integer multiples of one or more room dimension. The standing wave pattern is different for each modal frequency, causing a complicated sound field exhibiting a highly position-dependent frequency response. Enhanced systems are investigated with multiple degrees of freedom (independently-controllable sound radiating sources) to provide adequate low-frequency response control. The proposed solution, termed a chameleon subwoofer array or CSA, adopts the most advantageous aspects of existing room-mode correction methodologies while emphasizing efficiency and practicality. Multiple degrees of freedom are ideally achieved by employing what is designated a hybrid subwoofer, which provides four orthogonal degrees of freedom configured within a modest-sized enclosure. The CSA software algorithm integrates both objective and subjective measures to address listener preferences including the possibility of individual real-time control. CSAs and existing techniques are evaluated within a novel acoustical modeling system (FDTD simulation toolbox) developed to meet the requirements of this research. Extensive virtual development of CSAs has led to experimentation using a prototype hybrid subwoofer. The resulting performance is in line with the simulations, whereby variance across a wide listening area is reduced by over 50% with only four degrees of freedom. A supplemental novel correction algorithm addresses correction issues at select narrow frequency bands. These frequencies are filtered from the signal and replaced using virtual bass to maintain all aural information, a psychoacoustical effect giving the impression of low-frequency. Virtual bass is synthesized using an original hybrid approach combining two mainstream synthesis procedures while suppressing each method‟s inherent weaknesses. This algorithm is demonstrated to improve CSA output efficiency while maintaining acceptable subjective performance.
    • A hybrid virtual bass system for optimized steady-state and transient performance

      Hill, Adam J.; Hawksford, Malcolm O. J.; University of Essex (IEEE, 2010-09)
      Bandwidth extension of a constrained loudspeaker system is regularly achieved employing nonlinear bass synthesis. The method operates on the doctrine of the missing fundamental whereby humans infer the presence of a fundamental tone when presented with a signal consisting of higher harmonics of said tone. Nonlinear devices and phase vocoders are commonly used for signal generation; both exhibiting deficiencies. A system is proposed where the two approaches are used in tandem via a mixing algorithm to suppress these deficiencies. Mixing is performed by signal transient content analysis in the frequency domain using constant-Q transforms. The hybrid approach is rated subjectively against various nonlinear device and phase vocoder techniques using the MUSHRA test method.
    • Wide-area psychoacoustic correction for problematic room-modes using nonlinear bass synthesis

      Hill, Adam J.; Hawksford, Malcolm O. J.; University of Essex (Audio Engineering Society, 2011-11)
      Small room acoustics are characterized by a limited number of dominant low-frequency room-modes that result in wide spatio-pressure variations that traditional room correction systems may find elusive to correct over a broad listening area. A psychoacoustic-based methodology is proposed whereby signal components coincident only with problematic modes are filtered and substituted by virtual bass components to forge an illusion of the suppressed frequencies. Although this approach can constitute a standalone correction system, the impetus for development is for use within well-established correction methodologies. A scalable and hierarchical approach is studied using subjective evaluation to confirm uniform wide-area performance. Bass synthesis exploits parallel nonlinear and phase vocoder generators with outputs blended as a function of transient and steady-state signal content.