• Analysis, modeling and wide-area spatiotemporal control of low-frequency sound reproduction

      Hill, Adam J.; University of Essex (University of Essex, 2012-01)
      This research aims to develop a low-frequency response control methodology capable of delivering a consistent spectral and temporal response over a wide listening area. Low-frequency room acoustics are naturally plagued by room-modes, a result of standing waves at frequencies with wavelengths that are integer multiples of one or more room dimension. The standing wave pattern is different for each modal frequency, causing a complicated sound field exhibiting a highly position-dependent frequency response. Enhanced systems are investigated with multiple degrees of freedom (independently-controllable sound radiating sources) to provide adequate low-frequency response control. The proposed solution, termed a chameleon subwoofer array or CSA, adopts the most advantageous aspects of existing room-mode correction methodologies while emphasizing efficiency and practicality. Multiple degrees of freedom are ideally achieved by employing what is designated a hybrid subwoofer, which provides four orthogonal degrees of freedom configured within a modest-sized enclosure. The CSA software algorithm integrates both objective and subjective measures to address listener preferences including the possibility of individual real-time control. CSAs and existing techniques are evaluated within a novel acoustical modeling system (FDTD simulation toolbox) developed to meet the requirements of this research. Extensive virtual development of CSAs has led to experimentation using a prototype hybrid subwoofer. The resulting performance is in line with the simulations, whereby variance across a wide listening area is reduced by over 50% with only four degrees of freedom. A supplemental novel correction algorithm addresses correction issues at select narrow frequency bands. These frequencies are filtered from the signal and replaced using virtual bass to maintain all aural information, a psychoacoustical effect giving the impression of low-frequency. Virtual bass is synthesized using an original hybrid approach combining two mainstream synthesis procedures while suppressing each method‟s inherent weaknesses. This algorithm is demonstrated to improve CSA output efficiency while maintaining acceptable subjective performance.
    • Chameleon subwoofer arrays in live sound

      Hill, Adam J.; Hawksford, Malcolm O. J.; University of Essex (Institute of Acoustics, 2011-06)
      Live-sound subwoofer systems should deliver low-frequency sound evenly distributed throughout the audience area while simultaneously minimizing sound pressure levels on stage. Approximate solutions generally exploit cardioid subwoofers and/or steerable subwoofer clusters, yet require venue-specific manual fine tuning limited mainly by practical positioning issues. Enhanced live-sound systems are explored using a virtual three-dimensional acoustic space to model dominant venue characteristics. Specifically the Chameleon Subwoofer Array (CSA) is incorporated, already proposed as a solution to small-room low-frequency sound reproduction by extending the available degrees of freedom to control sound distribution in the target space. The CSA is adapted and scaled to match the large-scale dimensions typical of live events with 3-D simulation used to optimize and validate performance. Adaptation of existing industry-standard equipment with only minor modification is presented as a core feature.
    • Individualized low-frequency response manipulation for multiple listeners using chameleon subwoofer arrays

      Hill, Adam J.; Hawksford, Malcolm O. J.; University of Essex (IEEE, 2011-07)
      Low-frequency acoustical responses are naturally position dependent across wide listening areas. This is predominantly due to room modes in small, closed spaces. Numerous methodologies have been proposed targeting room mode compensation to give an objectively even response across all listening locations. These techniques cannot guarantee, however, that every listener receives an equally pleasing subjective response. Chameleon subwoofer arrays (CSA) were originally developed to minimize low-frequency spatiotemporal variations by addressing frequency response errors at multiple listening locations using a subwoofer system consisting of multiple degrees of freedom. The CSA system can alternatively be utilized to control listening locations independently, allowing each listener to adjust their localized low-frequency response to their liking. This alternate CSA implementation is evaluated using a bespoke finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm for small home theater applications.
    • Kick-Drum signal acquisition, isolation and reinforcement optimization in live sound

      Hill, Adam J.; Hawksford, Malcolm O. J.; Rosenthal, Adam P.; Gand, Gary; University of Essex; Gand Concert Sound (Audio Engineering Society, 2011-05)
      A critical requirement for popular music in live-sound applications is the achievement of a robust kick-drum sound presented to the audience and the drummer while simultaneously achieving a workable degree of acoustic isolation for other on-stage musicians. Routinely a transparent wall is placed in parallel to the kick-drum heads to attenuate sound from the drummer’s monitor loudspeakers, although this can cause sound quality impairment from comb filter interference. Practical optimization techniques are explored, embracing microphone selection and placement (including multiple microphones in combination), isolation-wall location, drum-monitor electronic delay and echo cancellation. A system analysis is presented augmented by real-world measurements and relevant simulations using a bespoke Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) algorithm.
    • Low-frequency temporal accuracy of small-room sound reproduction

      Hill, Adam J.; Hawksford, Malcolm O. J.; University of Derby; University of Essex (Audio Engineering Society, 2012-10)
      Small-room sound reproduction is strongly affected by room-modes in the low-frequency band. While the spectral impact of room-modes is well understood, there is less information on how modes degrade the spatiotemporal response of a sound reproduction system. This topic is investigated using a bespoke finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation toolbox to virtually test common subwoofer configurations using tone bursts to judge waveform fidelity over a wide listening area. Temporal accuracy is compared to the steady-state frequency response to determine any link between the two domains. The simulated results are compared to practical measurements for validation.
    • Practical applications of chameleon subwoofer arrays

      Hill, Adam J.; Hawksford, Malcolm O. J.; University of Essex (Audio Engineering Society, 2012-04)
      Spatiotemporal variations of the low-frequency response in a closed-space are predominantly caused by room-modes. Chameleon subwoofer arrays (CSA) were developed to minimize this variance over a listening area using multiple independently-controllable source components and calibrated with one-time measurements. Although CSAs are ideally implemented using hybrid (multiple source component) subwoofers, they can alternatively be realized using conventional subwoofers. This capability is exploited in this work where various CSA configurations are tested using commercially-available subwoofers in a small-sized listening room. Spectral and temporal evaluation is performed using tone-burst and maximum length sequence (MLS) measurements. The systems are implemented with practicality in mind, keeping the number of subwoofers and calibration measurements to a minimum while maintaining correction benefits.