Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Neil
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-19T10:52:34Z
dc.date.available2011-10-19T10:52:34Z
dc.date.issued2011-10
dc.identifier.citationPostfrontier Writing Issue, document 2, Online since 27en
dc.identifier.issnURL : http://ejas.revues.org/9272
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/145903
dc.description.abstractThis article uses the works of the writer, memoirist, and Lakewood, California public official, D. J. Waldie to deepen our concept of “region” and to re-assess many of the stereotypical discourses associated with the American suburbs. In the fashionable parlance of Mike Davis’ City of Quartz, Los Angeles has become defined by its “suburban badlands”; however, Waldie‘s work takes a different view in which his suburban home in LA is the focus for a more complex, multi-faceted approach to post-war suburbia. Typified by his re-assessment of the suburban grid as a “compass of possibilities,” his writings encourage a more nuanced and layered view of the communities and cultures fostered in such places. His key work Holy Land is an argument about why a disregarded place, an ordinary place like suburbia, can in fact contain qualities of life that are profound and reassuring. Through examining his work in its cultural and theoretical context this article looks below the expected “grid” of suburbia to demonstrate the rich life beyond its apparent anonymity.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEuropean Journal of American Studiesen
dc.titleThe compass of possibilities: re-mapping the suburbs of Los Angeles in the writings of D.J. Waldieen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalEuropean Journal of American Studiesen
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T12:41:29Z
html.description.abstractThis article uses the works of the writer, memoirist, and Lakewood, California public official, D. J. Waldie to deepen our concept of “region” and to re-assess many of the stereotypical discourses associated with the American suburbs. In the fashionable parlance of Mike Davis’ City of Quartz, Los Angeles has become defined by its “suburban badlands”; however, Waldie‘s work takes a different view in which his suburban home in LA is the focus for a more complex, multi-faceted approach to post-war suburbia. Typified by his re-assessment of the suburban grid as a “compass of possibilities,” his writings encourage a more nuanced and layered view of the communities and cultures fostered in such places. His key work Holy Land is an argument about why a disregarded place, an ordinary place like suburbia, can in fact contain qualities of life that are profound and reassuring. Through examining his work in its cultural and theoretical context this article looks below the expected “grid” of suburbia to demonstrate the rich life beyond its apparent anonymity.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Waldie EJAS PDF.pdf
Size:
156.9Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
main article

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record