Now showing items 1-20 of 177

    • Horizons

      Hall, Mark; University of Derby (SACI Florence, 2016-06-04)
    • Art, Maternal and Matrixial Encounters

      McCloskey, Paula; University of Sheffield (2013-12-06)
      Funded by the ESRC as a studentship ‘Art, Maternal and Matrixial Encounters’ is my PhD thesis. The opening paragraphs contextualise the research: ‘Ten years ago I saw the art-practice of French born artist Louise Bourgeois. I had come across her work before, but this time it was different. This time something happened. Viewing the work had an effect on me that I had not experienced before. I was drawn to the images and moved by them. I was mesmerised by the sensations that beholding the work was able to ignite in me. I was a newly single mother in my mid-twenties when this happened. I was in the midst of a traumatic time in my trajectory, a time where I felt lonely and lost. Louise Bourgeois' work was something I felt connected to, it made me feel differently about myself and my situation. Over time, I would come to think and refer to this happening as an encounter, it being an event that marked a tipping point in life. This encounter with Louise Bourgeois' oeuvre, this event that catalysed change is the starting point for this research….The feelings, the intensity, the sensations all worked in a way that was new and exciting. I could not let go of this 'happening'. I wanted to understand it, make sense of it and learn from it. At the time of this early encounter with Bourgeois' oeuvre I was in a distraught post-natal state, I felt that Bourgeois', art in a complex way that I did not understand, connected to my maternity. The complex connection to my maternity, both in terms of the reference to the maternal in the images and to how they made me feel is an important aspect of how I experienced Bourgeois' practice from the outset. When I first started to contemplate what this experience, this happening, might be, thinking of it as an encounter – an art encounter. At the time I was ignorant of this concept's use in philosophical and psychoanalytic texts that I would later discover and use when I embarked on this research. I started reflecting on my experience as an encounter, because when I discovered the work of Louise Bourgeois it constituted an unexpected event that I would credit with catalysing a turning point in my life. Once I started this research my understanding of encounter changed, as did my understanding of the encounter I experienced with the practice of Louise Bourgeois. Following the encounter with Bourgeois' art I read about, (among other uses of the concept of encounters) art encounters in the work of Simon O'Sullivan4 and maternal encounters in the work of Lisa Baraitser, which explore ideas and thinking that art encounters and maternal encounters respectively can potentially have a transformative affect/effect on subjectivity. Both of these books, along with others, which will be explored in the main text, informed how I came to think of the term encounter. The point of raising their use and influence at this stage is to alert the reader to the use specifically of the term art-encounter from the outset as stemming from my initial tacit use of the term encounter to think of my experience of the work of Louise Bourgeois, which would later be informed by reading around art and other encounters. I use it then to literally describe this experience, as well as exploring what an art-encounter is in more general terms as I work-through my art-encounter throughout this thesis. This research is one outcome of a process of contemplation that I engaged in to try and understand and make sense of this art-encounter. My art-encounter is thus not only used to locate the origins of this research; it is also invoked as a heuristic device to explore encounters beyond the scope of my art-encounter experience. This exploration continues to use my art-encounter, in part, as a case-study to consider, in the first instance, art-encounters' possible capacity for subjective transformation. Part of the contemplation of my art-encounter, which will be explored in more detail in different places throughout this thesis, was a consideration of the place of my maternal experience in the naming of the art-encounter with the work of Louise Bourgeois. The investigation into my art-encounter thus involves a teasing out of the place of maternal experience in this encounter; and, once again, using this experience, or the contemplation of this experience as a heuristic device within this research. In the process of deciphering the place of my maternal experience in the conditions and causes of my art-encounter I explore the potential of using traumatic maternal experience as a site of knowledge in and of itself. The process of inquiry into my art-encounter, and exploration of the place of my maternal experience in this encounter works towards revealing some insight into the conditions and characteristics of possible subjectivising encounters. This short narrative serves to introduce the research and provides some explanation for the two research questions, below, in terms of the issues embedded into the first, and then to the issues explored through the second: How can we understand an art-encounter's capacity for subjective transformation? When the invocation of traumatic maternal experience is explored as site of knowledge in the context of an art-encounter, what new insights might emerge into the conditions and characteristics of potentially subjectivising encounters?’
    • Nightbreed - the cabal cut

      Cherrington, Russell; University of Derby (Seraphim Films / Morgan Creek Films, 2017-12-01)
      Nightbreed is a 1990 Fantasy/Horror Film created by Polymath Clive Barker. In 2012 Russell Cherrington with the aid of Jimmi Johnson took all the available film elements, work prints, original cinema release and the 2nd draft script. The question was can the film be recreated and would it have an impact and a meaning in 2012. The finished film was screened at over 50 Film Festivals around the world from 2013 to 2015. It led to the Occupy Midian movement with over 10,000 follwers on Twitter, Facebook and the Internet. The film was restored into a Directors Cut in 2015 and finally in 2017 the Cabal Cut was released on Blu Ray.
    • The archaea (2017).

      Rushton, Stephanie; University of Derby (2017-03-24)
      The Archaea’ features a series of constructed photographic tableaux of tangled, botanical phantasmagoria, which refer to the landscape with a suggestion of figuration. Inspired by the ‘Jungle paintings’ of Max Ernst and alluding to Ballardian themes of Nature’s retribution, the resulting images succeed in being both menacing and simultaneously humorous. The high-contrast, backlit, large scale photographs are created in the studio and subsequently manipulated with a digital technique; used here to denote an underlying molecular structure redolent of microscopic photography. This serves to enforce a link between animal and vegetable but also lends the work a painterly quality, paradoxically at odds with the photographic medium. The resulting imagery emits a dreamlike quality that induces the pareidolic illusion latent in the human Psyche, this anthropomorphism further reinforcing the Archean molecular link between everything that exists. All plants, animals and humans, are biologically connected and this genetic inheritance can be traced back to the human brain and spinal column. The split between animals and plants on the Phylogenetic tree occurred around 1.6 million years ago, however with some plant species we still share as much as 75% genetic similarity.
    • The archaea (2015).

      Rushton, Stephanie; University of Derby (2015-09-15)
      Archaea’ refers to the kingdom of single celled organisms with the simplest known molecular structure, thought to be the closest living ancestor to the origin of all life on earth. ‘The Archaea’ features a series of constructed photographic tableaux of tangled, botanical phantasmagoria, which refer to the landscape with a suggestion of figuration. Inspired by the ‘Jungle paintings’ of Max Ernst and alluding to Ballardian themes of Nature’s retribution, the resulting images succeed in being both menacing and simultaneously humorous. The high-contrast, backlit, large scale photographs are created in the studio and subsequently manipulated with a digital technique; used here to denote an underlying molecular structure redolent of microscopic photography. This serves to enforce a link between animal and vegetable but also lends the work a painterly quality, paradoxically at odds with the photographic medium. The resulting imagery emits a dreamlike quality that induces the pareidolic illusion latent in the human Psyche, this anthropomorphism further reinforcing the Archean molecular link between everything that exists. All plants, animals and humans, are biologically connected and this genetic inheritance can be traced back to the human brain and spinal column. The split between animals and plants on the Phylogenetic tree occurred around 1.6 million years ago, however with some plant species we still share as much as 75% genetic similarity.
    • The archaea: painting digital photography.

      Rushton, Stephanie; University of Derby (Cambridge Scholars Publishing., 2018-09-01)
      How does one make a photographic body of work about Deep Ecology; the philosophy that considers humans to be equal to and no more important than any other species, advocating a radical re-adjustment of the relationship between humans and nature? This was the question I asked myself when I began a photographic project in 2014 entitled The Archaea. My interest stems from exploring the ecological relationship between humanity and the earth, and there are many sub-fields of psychology emerging to study these effects, such as eco-psychology or conservation psychology.
    • Across the decades (60 years).

      Basi, Philip Ranjit; University Of Derby (2016-08)
      2015 was the 60th year that the Derby West Indian Community Association (DWICA) has been delivering services to the Black and Culturally Diverse Community. DWICA acknowledged that the “DIAMOND” anniversary this was a milestone that should be celebrated. Through a funding application process DWICA successfully secured project financial resources from Heritage Lottery Fund to deliver a project called “Across the Decades” which showcased the achievements made by DWICA over the past sixty (60) years. This project was the foundation for the organisation to collated and document it’s’ legacy detailing the contributions made by the pioneering African Caribbean community coming to the city Derby, in the main from the Caribbean. In addition document the following (2nd & 3rd) generation’s contribution towards community development in Derby.
    • Exploring new voices in applied theatre.

      Jones, Rhiannon; Connelly, Heather; University of Derby (2019-01)
      Exploring New Voices: Future Practice in Applied Theatre Conference. Extend and refresh your practice among a creative community of theatre-makers, academics and world-class practitioners. We’ll be asking questions, addressing challenges, and sharing ideas as we explore how Applied Theatre can bring ‘New Voices’ into our work and revolutionise the way we co-create with diverse communities. Teachers, academics, students, and theatre-makers will all find new ways of developing and exploring their practice. You will exchange invaluable insights with practitioners working in a variety of fields within Applied Theatre, and participate in workshops led by the nation’s leading Applied Theatre specialists, each of whom will guide participants on a different area of practice under the umbrella concept of shared agency with communities. As part of the event InDialogue, (2019) Dr Rhiannon Jones (University of Derby) and Dr Heather Connelly (University of Lincoln) - Co Founders of InDialogue presented their artistic research & collaboration which focuses on the use of dialogue to generate practice across all creative disciplines. They also announced the call for participation for InDialogue 2019; the international symposium hosted by Derby Theatre.
    • 100 years of Bollywood part 1 & 2: queens of melody.

      Basi, Philip Ranjit; University Of Derby (BBC Red Button., 2014-01)
      BBC Asian Network curated a season of Bollywood-related content to mark the 100th Anniversary of the Indian Film Industry with an exciting offering of star interviews, Red Button specials and major BBC collaborations focused at providing a lasting legacy of this important anniversary. As the producer director of Asian Network’s successful Red Button TV offering I was tasked bringing the rich heritage of the Indian film industry to life through BBC archive and reflecting the work of community organisations right across the UK celebrating the wonder of Bollywood. Celebrating 100 years of Indian Cinema with the biggest stars who have featured on the BBC since the 70's. BBC Asian Network charted the journey of how Bollywood became the largest film industry in the world from the first ever film in shown in 1913. This special programme, featured interviews from Bollywood’s leading stars over the decades from legends including Rajesh Khanna, Raj Kapoor and Dilip Kumar right through to recent times where actors such as Shah Rukh Khan, Madhuri Dixit, Sri Devi, Anil Kapoor and Salman Khan took the industry global. This special programme was available on the Red Button and featured interviews from Bollywood's leading stars over the decades and had an audience of 850,00. Part 2 featured films start that had been performed and been on the BBC Asian Network and had special features from the Indian Film Awards and Bollywood Carmen, this show had an audience of 650,00. Queens Of Melody – The BBC Philharmonic and Asian Network collaborated for the first time ever in a celebration of the life and songs of Pakistani singer Noor Jehan and other legendary singers. International artists Shazia Manzoor and Qurat-ul-ain Balouch perform alongside the BBC Philharmonic in Bradford in front of a live audience for this unique event.
    • Riot 1831 1958 1981 2011 in Nottingham.

      Jones, Rhiannon; Nottingham Trent University (New Art Exchange, ADP Riot Tour and L-13.org Prophetic Promotions Press., 2016-09)
      In 2012 New Art Exchange opened its new season with a specially developed session considering the impact of the Nottingham riots one year on. Rhiannon Jones was commissioned by New Art Exchange, Synapse Arts and Nottingham City Council, to design a research project to facilitate conversations between voices of the hard to reach, local community members, youth groups and academics to discuss the effect that the riots has had on the people of Nottingham. This article was commissioned by New Art Exchange 5 years on, in 2016, was commissioned review the impact of Rhiannon Jones' 2012 project Mediated Riots, in order to revisit the lasting impact of the methodological findings and reflect on the research questions that the project raised. It questions the value of reflexivity, and the politics of socially and dialogically engaged research projects. The article was included in the publication that toured with ADP Riot Tour to 36 sites across the UK on a nationwide tour.
    • The drawing board

      Jones, Rhiannon; Kelly, Traci; Nottingham Trent University (2014)
      Traci Kelly and Rhiannon Jones’ collaborative practice presents writing as a dynamic visual and lived encounter in a manner particularly suited to a gallery context. The work exemplifies practice–as–research and is theoretically grounded in phenomenology, feminist and post feminist perspectives. It intentionally subverts and ruins the representation of writing in order to privilege the visceral and subjective production of the writerly.The momentum of the work developed during a writing residency initiated by Nottingham based international writer Michael Pinchbeck who invited the artists to collaborate in October 2014. The residency and the continuation into exhibition is an investigation into the materiality of chalk and writing as a physicality of site and self. The artists have predominantly employed performance and performativity as a temporal mode of making works, which exist in the interstice of documentation, artwork and survey. Their collaboration all plays with video installation and photographs along with developing sculptural works and the utilising of debris from gestures to creative seductive and fluid abstract surfaces. These Inter-related works explore writing as object, writing as materiality, the process of writing through the body and the subject invention inherent in writing a subject into being. An unedited sketchbook of the current body of writing investigations, from which several exhibition works are distilled, can be viewed within these two facebook albums Kelly & Jones’ residency in 2014. The Drawing Board was a space for handwritten performances that aims to turn a corridor into a destination and to return the walls of an old school building in Nottingham to their former use as a place of display. The Drawing Board explores how we write, how we perform writing and how writing performs.
    • The Eile project.

      McCloskey, Paula; Vardy, Sam; University of Derby, Sheffield Hallam University (2016-07)
      The Eile Project is an ongoing investigation of borders using art research methods. The research aims to investigate border subjectivities, border-linking/making; territorial fictioning, based in, across, and about the geopolitical border between Ireland and the UK. It uses multimedia visual art research that uses the subjective, spatial, political and imaginative, yet highly contested, concept of borders/bordering to respond to some of the immediate political and environmental challenges of our time. The Eile Project takes places on the contested UK border which crosses the island of Ireland dividing the land into the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. The investigation seeks to generate new ways of thinking of this border through the creation a new aesthetics generated mainly through site-specific performance acts by the character ‘Eile’. Through performative gestures using a range of materials Eile intervenes into this geopolitical border scene to develop a border-fictioning. ‘Eile’ is a creature of the border who has been summoned to interact with buildings, different species, the bogs, rivers, flora and fauna, caves, mountains and so on against the unfolding socio-political drama of this border, which at present takes the form of ‘Brexit’ (but previously has had many other iterations, such as ‘The Troubles’). This work has its roots in Paula’s family history. Paula’s family are from Ballyshannon, County Donegal, a small border town in the Republic of Ireland. Her mother was brought up in an Irish Protestant family and her father as Irish Catholic. Paula was born in 1975 at the height of the so-called ‘Troubles’ and during her childhood lived in England, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, regularly traversing the border. This brings a particular ‘situated knowledge’ (knowing as partial and located, and generated through interactions, Donna Haraway) to this border research practice, which is used in when Paula performs ‘Eile’ on the border-sites. There have been various outputs so far including site-specific performances, conferences, talks book chapters. This is an ongoing research project. This output links to the website which shows the history of the project, images, and film.
    • The Eile project experiment 3.

      McCloskey, Paula; Vardy, Sam; university of Derby; Sheffield Hallam University (2017-10)
      The Eile Project is an ongoing investigation of borders using art research methods. The research aims to investigate border subjectivities, border-linking/making; territorial fictioning, based in, across, and about the geopolitical border between Ireland and the UK. It uses multimedia visual art research that uses the subjective, spatial, political and imaginative, yet highly contested, concept of borders/bordering to respond to some of the immediate political and environmental challenges of our time. The Eile Project takes places on the contested UK border which crosses the island of Ireland dividing the land into the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. The investigation seeks to generate new ways of thinking of this border through the creation a new aesthetics generated mainly through site-specific performance acts by the character ‘Eile’. Through performative gestures using a range of materials Eile intervenes into this geopolitical border scene to develop a border-fictioning. ‘Eile’ is a creature of the border who has been summoned to interact with buildings, different species, the bogs, rivers, flora and fauna, caves, mountains and so on against the unfolding socio-political drama of this border, which at present takes the form of ‘Brexit’ (but previously has had many other iterations, such as ‘The Troubles’). This work has its roots in Paula’s family history. Paula’s family are from Ballyshannon, County Donegal, a small border town in the Republic of Ireland. Her mother was brought up in an Irish Protestant family and her father as Irish Catholic. Paula was born in 1975 at the height of the so-called ‘Troubles’ and during her childhood lived in England, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, regularly traversing the border. This brings a particular ‘situated knowledge’ (knowing as partial and located, and generated through interactions, Donna Haraway) to this border research practice, which is used in when Paula performs ‘Eile’ on the border-sites. This output relates to a site-specific performance that took place at the border RUC barracks in Belleek, Co. Donegal. From this performance we made a short film triptych which is available on Vimeo
    • To get there: designing together.

      Jones, Rhiannon; Nottingham Trent University (2018)
      Cumulus is the only global association to serve education and research in its disciplines. It is a forum for partnership, friendship and transfer of knowledge and best practices. Cumulus provides its members and partners a wide, flexible, dynamic and diversified friendly forum of exchange, cooperation and innovation. Cumulus promotes and empowers the talent of the next generation of creative and responsible people. Cumulus builds and maintains a dynamic forum bringing together top-level educational institutions from all parts of the world. The cultural diversity of a variety of nations is a source for synergy and excellence. Cumulus was founded in 1990 consisting currently of 257 members from 55 countries and being able to reach a minimum of 755.000 students and thousands of academics, staff and other audience. Cumulus is endorsed by UNESCO. FOR THE CONTEMPORARY ART WORKING GROUP. Border Crossings: Pilgrimage to Paris. Contemporary artists and designers cross borders collaborate on innovative and ask challenging questions about how artists and designers challenge the integrity of boundaries. The Contemporary Art Working Group theme in 2018 addressed the topics of identity, appropriation, collaboration, and hybridity as they pertain to relevant issues in contemporary art and design. Dr Rhiannon Jones presented the paper Design without Walls. The central research question being raised was how can art and design theory and practice work across boards. Providing examples of how artistic research and art and design teaching have achieve this and challenge it within an international context. BECAUSE WE BELIEVE THAT TOMORROW THE VARIOUS APPROACHES TO DESIGN RESEARCH SHOULD FOLLOW A COMMON PATH, WE AIM TO STIMULATE COLLABORATIVE PRACTICES TO LET INNOVATION AND UNPREDICTABILITY BREAK FREE. WE AIM TO GET AN OUTLOOK ON THE FUTURE, TO GET IDEAS WE WOULD NEVER HAVE HAD ALONE. TO GET SOMEWHERE NEW, ALL OF US. TO GET THERE, DESIGNING TOGETHER.
    • InDialogue

      Jones, Rhiannon; Nottingham Trent University (2014)
      InDialogue (Jones, and Connelly, (2012). Jones, and Connelly, (2014). Jones, and Newling (2014). Jones, and Kester (2014). Jones, and Kester (2016). Jones and Cologni (2016), and PhD research ‘The Artistry of Conversation’ (2016)) is a large scale, international and ongoing collaborative artistic research project asking how artists and researchers use and interrogate dialogue in their practice. It is theoretically informed by existing work on the dialogic by Kaprow, (1993), Back (2013), Bohm (1990), Bakhtin (1982), Kester (2004) and Hermans (1993/2010). InDialogue provides a socio-artistic, philosophical and international research platform for dialogic research. Its existence and ongoing archive has expanded the field of dialogic research within a global context (Kester 2015). The evolution of InDialogue (2012, 2014, 2016, forthcoming 2019) has supported numerous outputs, including academic critique of the symposia format tested by engaging over 380 participants and evidenced by over £163k in funding to date and 16 partnerships with cultural venues. The reach of research includes collaboration with Kester (2014, 2016) and conference papers presented at Cumulus (Milan, 2015 and Paris, 2018) to demonstrate new contributions to critical discourse and its growing relevance to the fields of performance, fine arts, dance, socio-linguistics, art history and dialogic studies. As principal investigator, curator and artist, Jones focused on how design of conversation generates a hospitable environment for artistic research, experimentation, interrogation and discussion about and through dialogue. Jones deliberately blurs and tests boundaries between academic and creative terrains (e.g. the simultaneous curation of InDialogue symposia, artistic residencies, exhibition and performance events) in order to propose InDialogue as a live method focused on production and design of conversation. Jones’ research combines architectural and performance theory in order to generate discourse. As a result of InDialogue, Jones has produced, tested and analysed an original methodology: the Artistry of Conversation (2016). Outcomes of InDialogue are in the form of Symposia, Exhibition, International Artist Residencies, Papers, Keynotes, Performances, etc. The impact of InDialogue is internationally recognized, by Design in Dialogue Jones has ‘advance the critical conversation in this burgeoning field. As dialogue and participation become ever more central methods across the arts and humanities…InDialogue will only become more important’ (Kester, 2015).
    • InDialogue panel three.

      Jones, Rhiannon; Nottingham Trent University; Loughborough University (2012)
      In Dialogue is an International Symposium that will interrogate how artists and researchers use dialogue in practice. In Dialogue will focus on performance, translation, as a methodology and curatorial practice, through a number of panel discussions, performances, workshops and presentations. It will utilize an eclectic mix of approaches and provide an opportunity for local, national and international dialogue between participants. The symposium grew out of a conversation regarding individual research interests; it deliberately sets out to present different ways in which the arts/artist use this term. It is curated by Viviana Checchia, Heather Connelly and Rhiannon Slade, and supported by Loughborough University and Nottingham Trent University – where each of the aforementioned participants are studying for their practice led PhD’s. It will take place at three sites across the city of Nottingham on August 30th – 31st August, supported by Nottingham Contemporary. The program will include a communal meal at a local Community Hall on Thursday evening and a day of activities at Primary, an artist-led space. Panelists include Bisan Abu Eisheh, Mirna Bamieh, Clare Charnley, Fucking Good Art, Newton and Helen Mayer Harrison, Dr Alex Mevel, John Newling, Alexandra Ross, WochenKlausur, Katerina Zdjelar. Performances and presentations from 20/20, Bartram and O’Neill, Rebecca Beinart, Tom Estes, Steve Fossey, Julie Fournier Lévesque, Traci Kelly, Matthews and Allen, Rachel Parry, Alexandra Ross, Miffy Ryan, Helena Tomlin and Julia Davies, Trio Collective, and Simon Withers. InDialogue was chaired by Dr Anna Ball, Nottingham Trent University. PANEL THREE: Performing Dialogue. Panelists Martina Reuter and Manfred Rainer from Wochenklausur, Newton and Helen Harrison from The Harrison Studio and John Newling each presented their latest work. Collectively their practice shares a common concern for the public interest which is activated through their use of the dialogic. The panel was chaired by Rhiannon Jones who facilitated a conversation between artists, countries, time zones and sites to discuss the use of conversation to generate practice.
    • ; a place of their own

      McCloskey, Paula; Vardy, Sam; University of Derby; Sheffield Hallam University (Paula McCloskey., 2010)
      ; a place, of their own is an experimental contemporary art and spatial research practice. We exploit the meeting of these fields to investigate contemporary conditions and create new spaces, imaginaries and subjectivities. ; a place, of their own. was co-founded in 2010 with our four children. We are Paula McCloskey and Sam Vardy, based in Sheffield, UK and Ballyshannon, Ireland. We make performances, spatial interventions and audio-visual art and research. Our projects explore the transformative potential of art and spatial practice to suggest other worlds yet to become; they are becomings enacted through collaboration, by asking questions, provoking dialogue and testing ideas, and try to prise the production of subjectivity and the radical imagination back from the grip of neoliberal forces.
    • Fragile cartographies of border fictioning: a place of their own.

      McCloskey, Paula; Vardy, Sam; University of Derby (2018-09)
      Our work operates between contemporary art and spatial practice and we explore the new forms of research and critical production that this space and overlap allows. The Eile Project is a visual art / research project that uses the subjective, spatial, political and imaginative concept of borders/bordering to respond to some immediate political/environmental challenges. The project is sited on the geo-political border between Ireland and the UK; we are a border family as Paula is from Ballyshannon, (Eire). She grew up between Ballyshannon and Enniskillen (NI), as well as living in England, and has traversed the Irish border her whole life. We now return to these places from Sheffield, UK with our own children, each year; the border thus remains at play across generations, time, and space. The context of the Irish/UK border condition is now given renewed prominence within the maligned ‘Brexit’ negotiations which threatens the peace process on the island of Ireland. We propose to show a screening of our audiovisual film, The Territories of Eile, which offers a speculative fictioning in which Eile makes and unmakes the borderlands; passing through them as they pass through her. Eile’s embodied performance gestures utilise organic and inorganic materials on the Irish/UK border territory to distort and create alternate ways of being. The Eile Project offers an interrogation that uses human-bodies and non-human bodies to create a world beyond the present, collapsing durational moments to create a fiction that might impact transformatively on the real. After the screening (4 mins) we would present a short paper discussing the ideas behind the film and their relation to the urban question. We are concerned with understanding how autonomous territories are made, undone, and remade anew - territories as spatial, sonic and social processes in which power, rather than being fixed and imposed as in sovereign borders (power as potestas), can emerge from the site, from the new border imaginaries, in a process of becoming - power as potentia.
    • Audiovisual border fictioning (of the body & territory): the Eile project, AV body conference, Huddersfield University.

      McCloskey, Paula; Vardy, Sam; university of Derby; Sheffield Hallam University (2018-06-12)
      The presentation Audiovisual Border Fictioning (of the body & territory) film and talk about The Eile Project (an investigation of borders using art research methods.) was presented AVBODY body conference in June 2018. The AVBODY body symposium "brings together practitioner-researchers working with digital media, dance tech, screendance, screen studies, experimental performance, performer training, visual anthropology, and other fields to examine relations between audiovisuality and embodiment in the contemporary moment." This international conference allowed us to present The Eile Project to a wide artist, research audience. We gave a presentation and showed the Eile film Territories of Eile. The presentation and film are attached/link.