• The disorderly animal in contemporary art

      Baker, Steve; University of Derby (2020)
    • The necessary gaze

      Baker, Steve; University of Derby (2020)
    • The contemporary animal

      Baker, Steve; University of Derby (2015)
    • How do we speak about art about animals?

      Baker, Steve; University of Derby (2014)
    • The contemporary animal

      Baker, Steve; University of Derby (2015)
    • The redescription of the world

      Baker, Steve; University of Derby (2014)
    • Beyond botched taxidermy

      Baker, Steve; University of Derby (2016)
    • Otherlings

      Bartram, Angela; McCloskey, Paula; University of Derby; Artcore (University of Derby, 18/10/2019)
      Otherlings is an exhibition featuring work from Ang Bartram, Steve Baker, Huw Davies and Philip Ranjit Basi, Craig Fisher, Paula McCloskey and Sam Vardy, Stephanie Rushton and Mally Mallinson, and Christine Parker. The overarching theme of the artworks within the exhibition suggests something beyond the parameters of dominancy and its cultural representation. The work in many ways offers explicit or implicit ways to connect us to other perspectives, and experiences through different and often unseen and discussed encounters. It thus opens up new paradigms for debate, for how we might live with care and compassion and function with others, as part of a world shared by many.
    • This is Derby: dialogic activism

      Jones, Rhiannon; Craig, Tom; Manning-Jones, Alix; Barth, Caroline; Turner, Will; University of Derby; Derby Theatre; Derby County Community Trust (Arts in Society, 2019-06)
      This paper explores the artistic research project "This is Derby" undertaken by University of Derby, Derby County Community Trust and Derby Theatre; the only Learning Theatre in the UK. The project engaged targeted participants living within identified areas of deprivation from the city of Derby. The research aimed to design a dialogic methodology using a "grass roots" approach to provide young people with free art activities. Examples will be provided in the paper of how the research was undertaken, what and how key barriers were identified by both schools and parents; including the lack of cultural integration outside of school time in the UK and the impact of lacks in financial or family support. The paper shares models of best practice whilst highlight the value of having undertaking an artistic and dialogic methodology. The impact of the project is extensively noted within UK contemporary social contexts and as a result of the findings, 9 community hubs and a virtual hub were created. This is Derby was a collaborative research project that has provided essential life skills for young persons in socio economically deprived areas of Derby, resulting in social mobility and new access to the arts. This paper disseminates both the design and impact of the research proposing that dialogic methodologies are an instigator for change in order to enable and empower younger persons. This is Derby has produced dialogic methodology that has actively contributed to the future cultural offering in the city of Derby and impacts on art research.
    • A holistic approach to the decolonisation of modules in sustainable interior design

      Di Monte-Milner, Giovanna; University of Johannesburg (Design Education Forum of Southern Africa, 2017-09)
      This paper stems from the need to develop and deliver a new module in sustainable interior design (BASD6B2) at a 2nd year level within a new Degree programme at the University of Johannesburg, in 2017. This module’s development however relies on a reflection on another sustainable interior design module (BASD6B1) in the curriculum, offered at a 1st year level. The paper also secondly arises from the national call for the transformation and decolonisation of education programmes in South African tertiary institutions. This new BASD6B2 module thus needs to demonstrate a deeper connection with African roots, rather than make use of over-emphasised Eurocentric ideals. Like the global Ubuntu education approach, decolonisation requires an advancement of indigenous knowledge, expertise, teaching and learning. Thirdly, there is also a need for interior design education, worldwide, to align itself with changing notions of sustainability, which requires educators to embrace a new, emerging ecological paradigm. In this paradigm, regenerative thinking seeks to push sustainable design from merely sustaining the health of a system, towards more holistic, systems thinking, reconnecting us to place and the rituals of place (Reed 2007, p. 677). A reflection on both the sustainable interior design modules’ designs reveals several gaps. Firstly, there is no specific requirement that the emerging ecological paradigm, and the notion of regenerative thinking, be taught within the module. Secondly, one of the module outcomes requires that students be taught about sustainability through the use of a rating tool, the Green Star SA (GSSA) Interiors Rating Tool, which, while valuable, is too mechanistic and does not support holistic thinking. Thirdly, another gap is that the Green Building Council of South Africa’s (GBCSA) Green Star SA – Interiors v1 Technical Manual includes little to no reference of African studies, methods and skills in the technical manual. This issue is revealed in my ongoing PhD study, which uses a constructivist grounded theory approach. Fourthly, the tool is based on an Australian tool which is, in turn, based on an American tool, and it thus deploys western constructs. The aim of this paper is thus to develop a teaching strategy that can complement the design of both modules, with a focus however on the new module BASD6B2, in order to teach students about sustainability more holistically, while celebrating and advancing African building methods and skills. The main findings reveal that the sustainable interior design modules (based on the given outcomes) do not support a holistic and decolonised approach to teaching and learning. A holistic teaching strategy is thus necessary to promote an African identity. The paper concludes that this pro-active teaching strategy can augment the sustainable interior design modules. Firstly both modules can include a holistic introductory lesson. A second tactic in the strategy could be to include diverse curriculum content and regenerative design concepts into the BASD6B2 module. This strategy generally aims to advance students’ mindsets about sustainable design, while encouraging them to be co-creators of local knowledge, while designing sustainably, for an African identity.
    • An effective pedagogical practise for integrating HIV and AIDS into tertiary education: an interior design case study

      Di Monte-Milner, Giovanna; Gill, A; University of Johannesburg (South African Journal of Higher Education, 2017)
      This article discusses a pedagogical practise used to introduce HIV and AIDS content into an existing Interior Design curriculum from a creative praxis perspective. Curriculum-integration is a key strategy of the Higher Education HIV/AIDS Programme (HEAIDS), which was established to develop and support HIV-mitigation programmes at South Africa’s public Higher Education Institutions. Students within the Faculty of Art, Design and Architecture at the University of Johannesburg engaged in a spatial intervention project that was structured around project-based learning strategies and constructivist teaching values. Students’ proposals were analysed against their ability to promote HIV and AIDS prevention and create appropriate meaning amongst the target group. The paper suggests that the methodology proved effective because it did not require radical curriculum transformation; aligned with existing programme outcomes; and demonstrated potential to contribute to the ‘new literacy of AIDS’ required to counter ‘AIDS fatigue’.
    • Addressing the needs of the other 90% - the role of cycling in developing the sustainable agenda in Johannesburg

      Di Monte-Milner, Giovanna; Breytenbach, Amanda; University of Johannesburg (The Greenside Design Centre, University of Johannesburg (CUMULUS), 2014)
      Cycling is an energy efficient nonpolluting form of transport and is considered as one of the most sustainable means of transport. In South Africa cycling has been poorly recognized and supported by government and citizens as a sustainable mode of transport. However, drastic changes are proposed for the transport systems in the City of Johannesburg (also Joburg) and citizens are showing a growing interest in cycling for both recreation and commuting purposes. This paper investigates the changing cycling culture in Johannesburg and the extent to which cycling is recognized by government and included in the development of a sustainability agenda that addresses the socio-economic needs of Johannesburg citizens. National cycling projects, cycling associations and cycling events such as the monthly Johannesburg Critical Bike Mass Ride events are briefly described and used as reference points to illustrate the growing interest expressed by non-profit organizations and citizens to accommodate cyclists on public roads. This investigation aims to make a contribution to the sustainable design project through reflecting on a drastic proposed change for Johannesburg city transport which will impact on various design disciplines that can provide specialist knowledge in the development of a sustainable transport system. This paper therefore acknowledge the complex dynamic system in which society operates and argue that through paying attention to the needs of citizens, designers can become co-creators within the system
    • Dogs and the elderly: significant cohabitation and companionship towards the end of life

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (29/04/2019)
      We seek comfort from other beings and this often finds a solution in our relationships with dogs. Walter Benjamin said “no single dog is physically or temperamentally like another,” which in part attests to our interspecies domestic closeness based on reliance and need. Nowhere is this seen more than in their companionship with the elderly. The positivity for health of a life with dogs is relevant to the elderly, those may feel isolated and vulnerable without another with whom to share life. Here, dogs become a vital companion, alleviating depression and isolation and giving a sense of usefulness. Although sharing one’s life with a dog gives purpose and comfort, it also brings anxieties regarding care and separation should that relationship change or cease. For the elderly, this concerns being worried of their dog’s fate should they enter managed housing or care facilities, or if separated by illness or death. The ‘burden’ they would leave sees the elderly intentionally deny homing another dog should theirs die. This denial renders the dog a last memorial to the significance of the companionship that informed life. This presentation discusses my art project ‘Dogs and the Elderly’ that focuses on the significance and benefit of interspecies companionship towards the end of life. This project with the Alzheimer’s Society demonstrates how interspecies cohabitation is valuable for emotional health and wellbeing. Participants offer heart-warming and heart- breaking accounts of a lonelier and dog-free life when their current companion becomes their last. The fear of not being able to ensure safe continuing care produces a self-imposed loneliness, one where it seems better to know they will not commit a dog to an unknown future than to benefit from their friendship now. The dog becomes the living remains of a relationship that can no longer be accommodated.
    • Dogs and the elderly

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (09/04/2019)
      We seek comfort from other beings, which in the absence of other humans often finds a solution in relationships with dogs. The positivity for health is particularly relevant to the elderly, who may be especially isolated and emotionally vulnerable. Although sharing one’s life with a dog gives purpose and comfort, it also brings anxieties regarding care and separation should that relationship change or cease. For the elderly, this concerns being worried for the dog’s fate should they be separated by entering housing or care facilities, or by illness or death. This seminar discusses the dilemma of leaving a ‘burden’ through the art project ‘Dogs and the Elderly,’ which analyses the importance of the interspecies relationships for physical and emotional health and wellbeing.
    • Treasuring detritus: Reflections on the wreckage left behind by artistic research

      Pinchbeck, Michael; Jones, Rhiannon; University of Derby; University of Lincoln (Taylor & Francis, 2019-11-21)
      In 2006, Rhiannon Jones and Michael Pinchbeck exhibited fragments from their ongoing practice as research as part of an exhibition at the Surface Gallery (Nottingham). Pinchbeck showed 365 objects wrapped in brown paper and string from a project called The Long and Winding Road that involved driving a car around the country for five years as a venue for one-to-one performance (the car was later immersed in the River Mersey and then crushed before being discarded in Michael Landy’s Art Bin). Jones was showing a video called Archived Actualities that re-traced the routes of 1000 scar stories; accidents shared with her by members of the public. Jones suggests that scars are innately performative through a collision of dialogic triangulation that takes place between the rupturing of skin, the process of scarification and the architectural shifts to sites of accident. This five-year project resulted in a solo exhibition in the UK and the USA where scar story objects were collected and displayed in a gallery context, donated by people who had contributed to the archive, as their stories were retold through a series of live performance works. As part of Pinchbeck’s project, the 365 objects were belongings left behind by his brother, who died in an accident in 1998. The piece explored the invisible scars left behind by grief and the literal baggage that makes manifest loss. The objects that were wrapped up lost their emotional charge until they were revealed again during the crushing of the car at the end of the journey, the emotional wreckage becoming literal, memories mangled like the car that housed his brother’s story. For this article, both writers reflect on the detritus of their practice as research, and how in some way, Pinchbeck’s car and Jones’ scar archive ‘stage the wreckage’ of the events that triggered them. The article explores traces that are embedded into our public presentation of self and other, and are objectified through the act of conversation, in order to ask if objects can carry scars like people carry memories. The article asks what remains after physical and emotional wreckage and proposes that instead of seeing this as sediment of loss we should treasure the detritus. Jones still has the objects donated to her archive that embody the stories she was told. Pinchbeck no longer has the 365 objects his brother left behind or the car that carried them on their journey.
    • Something’s gone wrong again

      Baker, Steve; University of Derby (Giovanni Aloi, 2017-11)
    • The hands of Beuys and Heidegger

      Baker, Steve; University of Derby (Whitechapel Gallery/ MIT Press, 2016)
    • Beyond batched taxidermy

      Baker, Steve; University of Derby (David Winton Bell Gallery, 2015-01-23)
    • Sztuka wspolczesna i prawa zwierzat

      Baker, Steve; University of Derby (Wydawnictwo Instytutu Badań Literackich PAN, 2015-01-01)
    • A poetics of graphic design?

      Baker, Steve; University of Derby (Occasional Papers, 2012-04-04)