• Altered states

      White, Christine; University of Derby (University of Chicago Press, 2009)
      The ways of reading the web are predominately visual, and it is rare for a viewer to simply read the pages one after another in a linear fashion; what is more usual is to edit as part of reading. We read a part, line or paragraph, skip irrelevant content and move through the information to find what we want. Often this is navigation done through visual structure, and by and through a sense of associative ideas. If this is the case, are we losing narrative student and are the readers enabled by this seeming lack of coherence?
    • The Alternative Document

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2018-11)
      A guest edited volume by Angela Bartram. Contents: Introduction, by Angela Bartram; Absence makes the heart grow fonder: rethinking intentional material loss in temporary art, by Sophie C. Kromholz; The Italic I – between liveness and the lens, by Emma Cocker and Clare Thornton; I am here – you are there: let’s meet sometime, by Andrew Pepper; HOW – Heathrow Orchard Walks, observations and explorations of vibrant land, by Kate Corder; Documentation with the result of its own performing, by Una Lee; Constructions of the moving body: drawing and dancing, by Rochelle Haley; WRITING/ PAINTING/READING/DRAWING: something not yet, and yet, still something, by Steve Dutton; (Mythologies of) diving, flying and in-between, by Louise K. Wilson; A sense of becoming and alienation: the retrospective in the work of Jordan McKenzie, by Angela Bartram.
    • The alternative document exhibition.

      Bartram, Angela; University of Lincoln (2016)
      Artists: Tim Etchells, Jordan McKenzie, Rochelle Haley, David Brazier & Kelda Free, Hector Canonge, Rachel Cherry, Luce Choules, Emma Cocker & Clare Thornton, Kate Corder, Chris Green & Katheryn Owen, Andrew Pepper, Louise K Wilson, Bartram O’Neill. Beyond most ephemeral artwork a memory remains in the mind of the observer and this forms part of the legacy of the fleeting event. However, memory is mostly a personal experience, that shifts, mutates, and fades over time to become distant, different to its origin, and in this way its archival potential is unreliable. To overcome this dilemma a variety of lens-based archival methods have become the tradition of recording the ‘actual’ event in as far as it is possible. Although a recorder, of any variation, can provide footage that gives place and context of the archive document, they present a dilemma – how much do they indicate what it was like to ‘be there’. For recordings are mediated and translated for posterity through the direction of the person holding the device and document their viewpoint and subjective encounter with the work. This creates an archival document open to subjective discussion, as a memorial and work in its own right, and of which alternatives are often sought. It is in this way that the disciplinary ghettos of event and documentation are abandoned in favour of a mode of practice that allows for a greater level of mutual critique. For documentation is also subject to the same vagaries of time as the event itself. Concerned with the ephemeral and how it is perceived Peggy Phelan represents a position on this subject of “you have to be there” in order to understand the ephemeral. Phelan acknowledges that a performance “become[s] itself through disappearance.” This argument draws empathy, but in practice is a less than pragmatic account of the reality of experiencing ephemeral works, for how is the work to exist beyond the moment if not recorded in some way. The Alternative Document exhibition at University of Lincoln seeks to expand on the idea of the ephemeral and its loss, by offering a platform where different acts of legacy can be witnessed and discussed. An accompanying symposium to the exhibition was held in Lincoln Performing Arts Centre on Saturday 13th February 2016 with a keynote address by Tim Etchells, and opened with a performance by Jordan McKenzie on the evening of Friday 12th February 2016.
    • The Alternative Document symposium.

      Bartram, Angela; University of Lincoln (2016-02)
      Beyond most ephemeral artwork a memory remains in the mind of the observer and this forms part of the legacy of the fleeting event. However, memory is mostly a personal experience, that shifts, mutates, and fades over time to become distant, different to its origin, and in this way its archival potential is unreliable. To overcome this dilemma a variety of lens-based archival methods have become the tradition of recording the ‘actual’ event in as far as it is possible. Although a recorder, of any variation, can provide footage that gives place and context of the archive document, they present a dilemma – how much do they indicate what it was like to ‘be there’. For recordings are mediated and translated for posterity through the direction of the person holding the device and document their viewpoint and subjective encounter with the work. This creates an archival document open to subjective discussion, as a memorial and work in its own right, and of which alternatives are often sought. It is in this way that the disciplinary ghettos of event and documentation are abandoned in favour of a mode of practice that allows for a greater level of mutual critique. For documentation is also subject to the same vagaries of time as the event itself. Concerned with the ephemeral and how it is perceived Peggy Phelan represents a position on this subject of “you have to be there” in order to understand the ephemeral. Phelan acknowledges that a performance “become[s] itself through disappearance.” This argument draws empathy, but in practice is a less than pragmatic account of the reality of experiencing ephemeral works, for how is the work to exist beyond the moment if not recorded in some way. The Alternative Document symposium, which accompanies the opening of the exhibition of the same name at University of Lincoln, seeks to expand on the idea of the ephemeral and its loss, by offering a platform where different acts of legacy can be witnessed and discussed. A guest edited edition of Studies in Theatre and Performance will be published from the project as a whole in the near future. The symposium was originated and led by Angela Bartram. The day coincided with the launch of the exhibition of the same name, and featured presentations by the artists in the exhibition (plus others). Tim Etchells delivered the symposium's keynote paper, and Jordan McKenzie gave a keynote performance to open the event at the same time as the launch of the accompanying exhibition on the evening of Friday 12 February 2016. Presenters: Tim Etchells, Jordan McKenzie, Annalaura Alifuoco, Hector Canonge, Ana Carvalho, Rachel Cherry, Luce Choules, Emma Cocker & Clare Thornton, Stewart Collinson, Kate Corder, Rochelle Haley, Min Kim, Sophie Kromholz, Anya Lifting, Chiara Passa, Andrew Pepper, Louise K Wilson. Created and led by Angela Bartram as part of the Alternative Document project. The symposium took place at Lincoln Performing Arts Centre, 12-13 February 2016.
    • Ambiguity, uncertainty and new realities: perspectives of creative value, utility and authenticity

      Wilson, Chris; Brown, Michael; University of Derby (KIE Conference Publications, 2015-07)
      The concept of creativity is synonymous with the formulation of value judgments. Related primarily to the experience of new and unfamiliar ideas, creativity is a subject directly connected to conceptions of adjustment, recalibration, measurement and evaluation. Albeit a subjective term open to considerable flexibility of interpretation, creativity has nevertheless become a capacity and commodity of notionally high social and economic value. Consequently, creativity has never been subject to greater scrutiny and judgement and understanding of creative value subject to greater discussion and evaluation. Exploring aspects of creativity associated with ambiguity and uncertainty through the discourse of authenticity and aesthetics, this chapter positions analysis in the narratives of insight and imagination, the romanticism of discovery and talent, and debates about the increasing virtualisation of creative practice and emerging prospect of artificial creativity. Investigating the potential for what might be described as authentic creativity, notions of forgery and fakery, serendipity, accidental discovery, and the dynamics of positive and negative creative conditions, provide a basis for focused consideration of the ‘how’ and ‘why’ of creative activity and the various ways these relate to the determination of value in the ‘what’ of creative outcomes. Exploring first the nature of creative value and closely related definitions of creativity, consideration is then given to the temporal and cultural dynamics of creative value judgments before focusing more specifically on contexts of creativity and areas of creative ambiguity. Introducing a series of illustrative case studies, discussion focuses on the parameters of creative value judgements to underpin a tentative definition of creative authenticity. Conclusions highlight a range of possible perspectives related to the subjective nature of creativity and definitions of creative value. Creativity and creative value can be determined simply according to the scale of impact on human well-being, progress, fulfillment, security, or other suitable value indicator, the quality of lived human experience, the intrinsic qualities of the object, artefact or activity, or combination of all three. Given the inherent diversity and instability of creation and reception contexts, the search for any form objective measure of creative value may be a fruitless one. However, it is in the very subjectivity of creative experience that creative authenticity is most visible.
    • The ancestral forest: memory, space and ritual among the Kulunge Rai of the Eastern Nepal

      Nicoletti, Martino; University of Derby, School of Art and Design (Vajra Publications - Kathmandu, 2006)
      An ethnographic monography devoted to the religion of the Kulunge Rāi ethnic group of eastern Nepal. Bearing witness to a far-off past of hunting and nomadic life, Kulunge's myths and legends form a plot and scenario that comprise a multitude of invisible entities: the “hunter-spirits” and the “monkey spirits”, the undisputed sovereigns of the forest world; Laladum, the deity who resembles a little girl, the initiator of young shamans from the villages of the area; the Nagi, or ophidiomorphic-spirits, dwelling in the waters, the totem ancestors of the Kulunge Rāi group; Molu, a mythical forefather, lost in the woods and transformed into a deity. A journey through the oral memory, the sacred geography and religious imaginary of this people. An ideal itinerary that progressively abandons the inhabited world and enters the abysses of the mythical woodlands – the silent witnesses of the group’s ancient life style – only to lose itself in the thick of the immense forests that even today surround the settlements of the Kulunge Rāi.Starting from the cults of domestic deities, the research goes on to analyse the rituals that accompany the souls of the dead and the village farming cults, as a necessary step before dealing with the hunting cults and the hidden paths beaten by Kulunge Rāi shamans.
    • Antarctica: Live surround exploration

      Crossley, John; Lane, Kit; University of Derby (2016-02)
      A surround sound music composition by John Crossley inspired by the sounds of the Antarctic, with accompanying video sequences. Source material included survey data and images from various research institutes including NASA. As well as photographic and video images, geographical and geological data was manipulated to create original visualisations.
    • ANTONYM: Life With and Without Animals: an online exhibition

      Bartram, Angela; Baker, Steve; University of Derby (2020-11)
      The online exhibition ANTONYM: Life With and Without Animals presents the work of eight artists from the UK, USA and Iceland at Artcore, Derby. Each makes artwork that engages with the more-than-human world, reflecting on contemporary threats to nonhuman life as well as on the pleasures of our relationships with other species. The exhibition coincides with the online conference Life With and Without Animals at the University of Derby, and is its companion exhibition. Like its companion, this exhibition was scheduled for physical delivery at Artcore, but due to the Covid-19 pandemic a decision was made to make this online. Both events were organised and curated by Steve Baker and Angela Bartram. The exhibition includes work by the following international artists: Andrea Roe and Cath Keay; Angela Bartram; Paula McCloskey and Sam Vardy; Johanna Hällsten; Julia Schlosser; Lee Deigaard; Bryndís Snæbjörnsdóttir and Mark Wilson; and Steve Baker.
    • Applications of cognitive science in scenographic reception and processes: Scenographic contraptions

      Penna, Xristina; University of Leeds (University of Helsinki, 13/06/2016)
    • Applied theatre solo performance: “Acting Alone” – artist led research exploring boundaries of performer / audience relationships

      Hunt, Ava; University of Derby (23/04/2016)
      Acting Alone is a solo performance based on seven years of artistic and creative research into the theatrical conventions used within Applied Theatre practice. Hunt’s solo performance research challenges the theatrical form, raises questions and provokes debate through the use of immersive conventions. Acting Alone toured extensively throughout the UK at festivals, theatre venues, in schools and colleges. The piece performed to a wide range of self-selecting audiences – age, class, religion, gender and cultural identity. Verbatim experiences of ordinary Palestinian people where told against documentary accounts of historical and autobiographical stories woven together to provide counter arguments against racist discourse. This applied theatre practice challenged the theatrical boundaries of performer/audience relationships through subtle moments of participation finishing with an invitation to make a difference.
    • The Archaea

      Rushton, Stephanie; University of Derby (2017-05-19)
      Stemming from a fascination with plants and focussing on 'intelligence in nature' Stephanie Rushton will talk about her recent digitally manipulated photographic imagery 'The Archaea’. Visually inspired by the jungle imagery of the 20th Century Surrealist artist Max Ernst and underpinned by a diverse and wide ranging enquiry the Archaea considers our genetic link not just to other animals, but to all of life. Humanity often believes itself to be separate and superior to all other life forms, despite evidence that we have evolved from or alongside every other living organism and are interconnected and interdependent in surprising ways. Responding to Andre Breton's 1924 'Manifesto of Surrealism' Max Ernst published a collection of 34 images under the title 'Histoire Naturelle', a series created with an automatic technique he coined Frottage. 'The Archaea' imagery pays homage to this work and to the playful spirit in which it was created. Ernst, who weaved aspects of alchemy, animism and shamanism into this work, was embracing surrealist automatism, and simultaneously attempting to regain a spiritual harmony with nature that he felt had been lost with increasing technological advancement and rationalism. Attempting to connect to Ernst's surrealist methodology, Rushton collected plants and other 'found' vegetal flotsam from the garden over given periods of time to juxtapose in her digitally created photographic tableaux. This has resulted in a series of darkly constructed botanical still life imagery, which refer to the landscape with a suggestion of anthropomorphic figuration. The imagery is subsequently manipulated with various Photoshop techniques that lend the work a painterly quality not unlike the Frottage method, but simultaneously depict a cellular or scientific feel that reinforces the molecular link between animal and vegetable; the resulting images succeed in being both menacing and simultaneously humorous.
    • The archaea (2015)

      Rushton, Stephanie; University of Derby (2015-09-15)
      Archaea’ refers to the kingdom of single celled organisms with the simplest known molecular structure, thought to be the closest living ancestor to the origin of all life on earth. ‘The Archaea’ features a series of constructed photographic tableaux of tangled, botanical phantasmagoria, which refer to the landscape with a suggestion of figuration. Inspired by the ‘Jungle paintings’ of Max Ernst and alluding to Ballardian themes of Nature’s retribution, the resulting images succeed in being both menacing and simultaneously humorous. The high-contrast, backlit, large scale photographs are created in the studio and subsequently manipulated with a digital technique; used here to denote an underlying molecular structure redolent of microscopic photography. This serves to enforce a link between animal and vegetable but also lends the work a painterly quality, paradoxically at odds with the photographic medium. The resulting imagery emits a dreamlike quality that induces the pareidolic illusion latent in the human Psyche, this anthropomorphism further reinforcing the Archean molecular link between everything that exists. All plants, animals and humans, are biologically connected and this genetic inheritance can be traced back to the human brain and spinal column. The split between animals and plants on the Phylogenetic tree occurred around 1.6 million years ago, however with some plant species we still share as much as 75% genetic similarity.
    • The archaea (2017)

      Rushton, Stephanie; University of Derby (2017-03-24)
      The Archaea’ features a series of constructed photographic tableaux of tangled, botanical phantasmagoria, which refer to the landscape with a suggestion of figuration. Inspired by the ‘Jungle paintings’ of Max Ernst and alluding to Ballardian themes of Nature’s retribution, the resulting images succeed in being both menacing and simultaneously humorous. The high-contrast, backlit, large scale photographs are created in the studio and subsequently manipulated with a digital technique; used here to denote an underlying molecular structure redolent of microscopic photography. This serves to enforce a link between animal and vegetable but also lends the work a painterly quality, paradoxically at odds with the photographic medium. The resulting imagery emits a dreamlike quality that induces the pareidolic illusion latent in the human Psyche, this anthropomorphism further reinforcing the Archean molecular link between everything that exists. All plants, animals and humans, are biologically connected and this genetic inheritance can be traced back to the human brain and spinal column. The split between animals and plants on the Phylogenetic tree occurred around 1.6 million years ago, however with some plant species we still share as much as 75% genetic similarity.
    • Archaea and Rejoicing the Sun

      Rushton, Stephanie; University of Derby (Royal Photographic Society, 2019)
    • The archaea: painting digital photography.

      Rushton, Stephanie; University of Derby (Cambridge Scholars Publishing., 2018-09-01)
      How does one make a photographic body of work about Deep Ecology; the philosophy that considers humans to be equal to and no more important than any other species, advocating a radical re-adjustment of the relationship between humans and nature? This was the question I asked myself when I began a photographic project in 2014 entitled The Archaea. My interest stems from exploring the ecological relationship between humanity and the earth, and there are many sub-fields of psychology emerging to study these effects, such as eco-psychology or conservation psychology.
    • Are my cognitive maps the same as yours? …or even, the same as mine?

      Lennox, Peter; University of Derby (29/01/2013)
      Cognitive map metaphors have become ubiquitous in diverse spatial perception research fields. Tolman's original 1948 formulation referred to way-finding in mazes, O'Keefe and Nadel described particular neural structures that can support spatial behaviours. Other usages may be more metaphorical and may even be incommensurate, one with the other. This talk was a discussion piece to compare and contrast current usages
    • Are training and education mutually exclusive?

      Lane, Kit; Lewis, Simon P.; University of Derby (2015)
      Stage’ at the PLASA London show, October 2015. Our talk was in response to a view held widely in the live event industry that degree level programs do not adequately prepare students for the industry. We outlined the approaches to real-world learning that we have applied over the years in the Sound, Light and Live Event Technology degree and the Technical Theatre Degree and described the Learning Theatre. We presented a number of case studies of high profile graduate destinations.
    • Are you a researcher as well as a medical illustrator?

      Bryson, David; University of Derby (2013-12)
      When we list the areas of practice for medical illustrators we always include research, but how involved in research are we? The aim of this activity is to encourage your professional development not just as a medical illustrator but your involvement with research whether that is undertaking your own research, undertaking evidence based practice (1) , working as part of a research team, advising researchers on the value of medical illustration or supporting a student undertaking a research project for their degree or post-graduate qualification.
    • Art and maternal subjectivity: an ongoing relation

      McCloskey, Paula; University of Derby (M/other voices, 2015-04-20)
      Art and maternal subjectivity: an ongoing relation’ is an online journal column I wrote for M/other voices organisation in Rotterdam, NL following an artist talk I gave in July 2014. Both research events explore the research question below. They form part of the ongoing iterative research which weaves through my arts practice and art writing on Art, Maternal and Matrixial Encounters. This research is located in my PhD research Art, Maternal and Matrixial Encounters (University of Sheffield, 2014). Working with maternity as a thinking apparatus and as integral to my practice is manifested in the collaborative arts practice ‘a place of their own’ (see separate Udora handle and website link), and various distributed pieces of writing, talks and art projects. The concept of the matrixial recurs in this work, referring to artist and psychoanalyst Bracha Ettingers’ matrixial theory which explores the lasting legacy of the intrauterine encounter between the I (foetus in late stages of pregnancy) and non I (pregnant woman). Throughout this work the research question is: if maternity is taken to be a thinking apparatus, a concept, an encounter, as well as a lived experience what insights and new knowledge might emerge from arts practice and art writing that explores the complex entanglements of ‘maternity’ (in its broadest sense) and art?
    • Art, Maternal and Matrixial Encounters

      McCloskey, Paula; University of Sheffield (2013-12-06)
      Funded by the ESRC as a studentship ‘Art, Maternal and Matrixial Encounters’ is my PhD thesis. The opening paragraphs contextualise the research: ‘Ten years ago I saw the art-practice of French born artist Louise Bourgeois. I had come across her work before, but this time it was different. This time something happened. Viewing the work had an effect on me that I had not experienced before. I was drawn to the images and moved by them. I was mesmerised by the sensations that beholding the work was able to ignite in me. I was a newly single mother in my mid-twenties when this happened. I was in the midst of a traumatic time in my trajectory, a time where I felt lonely and lost. Louise Bourgeois' work was something I felt connected to, it made me feel differently about myself and my situation. Over time, I would come to think and refer to this happening as an encounter, it being an event that marked a tipping point in life. This encounter with Louise Bourgeois' oeuvre, this event that catalysed change is the starting point for this research….The feelings, the intensity, the sensations all worked in a way that was new and exciting. I could not let go of this 'happening'. I wanted to understand it, make sense of it and learn from it. At the time of this early encounter with Bourgeois' oeuvre I was in a distraught post-natal state, I felt that Bourgeois', art in a complex way that I did not understand, connected to my maternity. The complex connection to my maternity, both in terms of the reference to the maternal in the images and to how they made me feel is an important aspect of how I experienced Bourgeois' practice from the outset. When I first started to contemplate what this experience, this happening, might be, thinking of it as an encounter – an art encounter. At the time I was ignorant of this concept's use in philosophical and psychoanalytic texts that I would later discover and use when I embarked on this research. I started reflecting on my experience as an encounter, because when I discovered the work of Louise Bourgeois it constituted an unexpected event that I would credit with catalysing a turning point in my life. Once I started this research my understanding of encounter changed, as did my understanding of the encounter I experienced with the practice of Louise Bourgeois. Following the encounter with Bourgeois' art I read about, (among other uses of the concept of encounters) art encounters in the work of Simon O'Sullivan4 and maternal encounters in the work of Lisa Baraitser, which explore ideas and thinking that art encounters and maternal encounters respectively can potentially have a transformative affect/effect on subjectivity. Both of these books, along with others, which will be explored in the main text, informed how I came to think of the term encounter. The point of raising their use and influence at this stage is to alert the reader to the use specifically of the term art-encounter from the outset as stemming from my initial tacit use of the term encounter to think of my experience of the work of Louise Bourgeois, which would later be informed by reading around art and other encounters. I use it then to literally describe this experience, as well as exploring what an art-encounter is in more general terms as I work-through my art-encounter throughout this thesis. This research is one outcome of a process of contemplation that I engaged in to try and understand and make sense of this art-encounter. My art-encounter is thus not only used to locate the origins of this research; it is also invoked as a heuristic device to explore encounters beyond the scope of my art-encounter experience. This exploration continues to use my art-encounter, in part, as a case-study to consider, in the first instance, art-encounters' possible capacity for subjective transformation. Part of the contemplation of my art-encounter, which will be explored in more detail in different places throughout this thesis, was a consideration of the place of my maternal experience in the naming of the art-encounter with the work of Louise Bourgeois. The investigation into my art-encounter thus involves a teasing out of the place of maternal experience in this encounter; and, once again, using this experience, or the contemplation of this experience as a heuristic device within this research. In the process of deciphering the place of my maternal experience in the conditions and causes of my art-encounter I explore the potential of using traumatic maternal experience as a site of knowledge in and of itself. The process of inquiry into my art-encounter, and exploration of the place of my maternal experience in this encounter works towards revealing some insight into the conditions and characteristics of possible subjectivising encounters. This short narrative serves to introduce the research and provides some explanation for the two research questions, below, in terms of the issues embedded into the first, and then to the issues explored through the second: How can we understand an art-encounter's capacity for subjective transformation? When the invocation of traumatic maternal experience is explored as site of knowledge in the context of an art-encounter, what new insights might emerge into the conditions and characteristics of potentially subjectivising encounters?’