• The boy who cried wolf [Arabic edition]

      Jenkins, Saffy; Broadley, Leo; University of Derby (Harper Collins (Big Cat), 01/08/2016)
      Collins Arabic Big Cat is a guided reading series for ages 3 to 11. The series is structured with reference to the learning progression of Arabic at nursery and primary schools researched especially for Collins. This carefully graded approach allows children to build up their reading knowledge of Arabic step by step. Level 5 books are for children who are ready to read stories with more challenging word patterns or non-verbal sentences with 2 or 3 words, and with total support through illustrations and extensive use of repetition. Double spacing is used between words to ensure children see where each new word in a sentence begins and ends to ensure the focus remains on reading core words. A shepherd boy decides to play a trick on the people in his village by telling them that there is a wolf nearby. But will the villagers believe him when a wolf really does turn up? This witty retelling of the traditional story was written by Saffy Jenkins.
    • Curious apothecary.

      McNaney, Nicky; University of Derby (14/10/2017)
      A artist book Curious Apothecary is published within in a Artist Book "Prescriptions " as part of a wider research project on artists’ books and the medical humanities, organised by the University of Kent and the University of New England (Maine Women Writers Collection), and supported by the Wellcome Trust. The book explores the role book arts can play in raising awareness of the richness and value of live accounts of illness.
    • Curious Apothecary; A screen-printed artists publication

      McNaney, Nicky; University of Derby (2015-06)
      After interviewing the archivist and investigating the historical apothecary ephemera found at the Thackery medical museum in Leeds, I created a number of individual illustrated responses to the information discovered to record and comment on the unusual medical practices of the 18thcentury. The work invites the viewer to create their own interpretation of the curious nature of the medical practices that took place in the 18th century and challenges the traditional processes of illustration through printmaking, while exploring its application in a more contemporary artists book format.
    • Curious Apothecary; An artists publication

      McNaney, Nicky; University of Derby (2016-09)
      “Prescriptions” was a juried exhibition of book art to supplement Martha Hall’s exhibition of works as part of Artists’ Books and the Medical Humanities symposium and workshop. The symposium, which launched Prescriptions, explored connections between artists' books, health/illness and medicine from interdisciplinary perspectives. The publication “Curious Apothecary” invites the viewer to create their own interpretation of the curious nature of the medical practices that took place in the 18th century and challenges the traditional processes of illustration through printmaking, while exploring its application in a more contemporary artists book format.
    • Hand on heart

      McNaney, Nicky; University of Derby (29/09/2017)
      An Illustration created for Rankin Photography Studio, to promote British Heart Foundation, “World Heart Day” An international art project with creatives from around the world, to raise awareness of the global fight against heart disease through the use of social media.
    • Head space and Dark days.

      McNaney, Nicky; University of Derby (Broken Grey Wires, 26/02/2018)
      Broken Grey Wires is an ongoing investigation into art and mental health by developing a dialogue with leading contemporary artists. Two screen-printed illustrations,Head Space and Dark Days are included in an artist book Psycho published by Broken Grey Wires.
    • Homemaker

      McNaney, Nicky; University of Derby (Surface Gallery, 2016-01)
      The postcard was exhibited at the The International Postcard Show,Surface Gallery, Nottingham.The postcard exhibition featured hundreds of original artworks in a wide range of media by established artists, from all over the world. The postcard was created using traditional drawing and screen-printed media based around an old mid -century cupboard and its contents.
    • Homestead

      McNaney, Nicky; University of Derby (Highlights, 2016)
      The artist book was exhibited at the Contemporary Artists’ PAGES, Book Fair, The Tetley, Leeds & in a touring exhibition of paper-cut and artist’s books in Cumbria and Northumbria. The book was published in conjunction with an artist book project created for the third year illustration student cohort and was used as an example for learning and teaching.
    • Illustrated worlds

      Bosward, Marc; Levesley, Richard; University of Derby (Association of Illustrators, 2013-10)
      The practice of the contemporary illustrator is no longer exclusively defined by the traditional orthodoxies of the commissioner and illustrator relationship. Contemporary Illustration has expanded the parameters of the discipline to include toys, games, animation, collectable objects, fashion and other forms of media and merchandising. This multi-disciplinary and authorial practice is often predicated on the creation of an identifiable, virtual ‘world’ that is manifest across an illustrator’s output, independent of variations in audience, purpose and subject matter. This paper will explore the illustrator’s use of visual language in constructing virtual, illustrated worlds.Drawing from a range of contemporary examples, the paper will explore the capacity of illustration to generate a virtual world that engages and absorbs its audience. The paper will argue that a sense of place established through non-representational approaches can address the actual, socio-historical world through the interpretation of the constructed world’s diegesis. The paper will also consider how a world is realised across personal and commercial outputs and the interrelationship and interface of authorial and commercial imperatives.
    • Illustrated worlds, virtual environments and authorial voice

      Bosward, Marc; Levesley, Richard; University of Derby (2013-01)
      The practice of the contemporary illustrator is no longer exclusively defined by the traditional orthodoxies of the commissioner and illustrator relationship. Contemporary Illustration has expanded the parameters of the discipline to include toys, games, animation, collectable objects, fashion and other forms of media and merchandising. This multi-disciplinary and authorial practice is often predicated on the creation of an identifiable, virtual 'world' that is manifest across an illustrator's output, independent of variations in audience, purpose and subject matter. This paper will explore the illustrator's use of visual language in constructing virtual worlds that define authorial voice. Drawing from a range of contemporary and historical examples, the paper will explore the capacity of illustration to generate a virtual world that engages and absorbs its audience. How does an illustrator use the language of exaggeration, distortion, symbolism and metaphor to construct a system of coherent signifiers that constitute a world that is repeatedly revisited across their practice? The paper will argue that a sense of place established through non-representational approaches can address the actual, socio-historical world through the interpretation of the constructed world's diegesis. An analysis of contemporary illustration in its relationship to genre and authorship will be discussed in relation to this premise. The paper will also consider how a world is realised across personal and commercial outputs and the interrelationship and interface of authorial and commercial imperatives. The paper will offer an assessment of these issues, offering approaches for illustrators to explore the intellectual, psychological and emotional resonance of illustrated worlds, and to extend the formal and thematic parameters that determine illustration's status as a narrative form.
    • Illustrating Corsica: The modernist landscape of John Minton's Time Was Away.

      Neal, Ian; University of Derby (Intellect Ltd., 01/04/2018)
      The article considers John Minton’s (1917–57) illustrations of landscape for the book Time Was Away: A Notebook in Corsica (1948) with an aim to recover their significance in the history of illustration. Certain illustrations are positioned as notable for their ambiguous relationship to the text. I elaborate thinking around text–image relations alongside questions concerning the cross-fertilization of fine art and illustration. In their adoption of modernist principles, Minton’s illustrations are significant in recasting the role of illustration in the artistic context of post-war Britain. In melding formalist effects with realist concerns, the illustrations raise broader matters around realism, fine art and the democratic potential of illustration. I show that in seizing on cinematic techniques, Minton offers an effectively modern response to the traditional paradigm of depth associated with landscape and thereby proffers an alternative to the Modernist paradox that a teleological development of painting is at odds with landscape.
    • Jane Eyre's Arrival at Thornfield Hall: Illustration of Jane Eyre’ arrival at Thornfield Hall

      McNaney, Nicky; University of Derby (2014-06)
      The illustration was awarded first prize in the illustration section of the Brontë Society creative competition. The print submitted for the Brontë creative competition investigated and examined the use of hand drawn elements in a predominantly photographic printing process and how this might be developed and disseminated to the design student cohort through my teaching using the photogravure method of creating mark-making. The work has been viewed at local, national and international levels by those interested in the works of the Bronte’s and the research could potentially give a greater understanding of the history and literature of the Bronte’s to general art enthusiasts and a wider public audience. Also published in Bronte Studies January 2015 40 (1)
    • John Minton’s "Time was away: A notebook in Corsica"

      Neal, Ian; University of Derby (10/11/2016)
      The paper examines the range in Minton’s approach at two levels. Firstly, it considers his dual strategies of Romanticism and Realism. Minton conflates topographical concerns with Neo-Romantic tendencies and draws on the landscape traditions of the sublime and picturesque, and the trope of the figure in the landscape. Secondly, the paper examines the images within a register of autonomy. Some images, operate autonomously, procuring primarily aesthetic responses; in contrast, others demand more literal intertextual readings; still, a further category of semi autonomous images are identified which subtly evoke elements of the text, without being hostage to Ross’s prose. These works in particular, I argue, invite the reader/viewer to re-assemble text and image so as to re-envision and re-imagine the Corsican Landscape. By examining text-image relationships, the place of landscape in post-war illustration, collaborative practice, and the relationship between fine art and illustration, the paper aims to contribute to forwarding the theorisation of illustration.
    • Limited edition screenprint

      Levesley, Richard; University of Derby (2015-02)
      My work explores themes of humour, word play, narrative and visual storytelling. Focus is on the use of Illustration to explore personal voice and the extent that this can be applied to processes whilst retaining visual identity. I am interested in the process of Illustration and experimentation in various outputs, this is currently leading me into further visual treatment such as 3d laser cut artworks and ceramics.
    • The long commute

      McNaney, Nicky; University of Derby (2015-11)
      The Long Commute , is a screen-printed illustration submitted for the,‘Tales of the City' Cheltenham Illustration Awards, University of Gloucestershire. This work was inspired by the journey taken each morning from the country to the city and the differing experiences encountered along the way.
    • Manifest destiny, violence and transcendence

      Bosward, Marc; University of Derby (09/09/2011)
      My principal area of interest is using digital media within a cross-disciplinary methodology that incorporates drawing, painting, collage, typography, moving image and writing.The primary theme that concerns the work contained within the exhibition is the human psychologies’ innate need to transcend the isolation of individual existence. Particular focus is given to the destructive and violent expressions of that need from a societal perspective. This central premise underpins the attempt to explore various sociological phenomena, historical and contemporary, related to authoritarianism, conformity and armed conflict.
    • Manifest destiny, violence and transcendence – an artist’s statement

      Bosward, Marc; University of Derby (University of Salford Press, 2012)
      My principal area of interest is using digital media within a cross-disciplinary methodology that incorporates drawing, painting, collage, typography, moving image and writing.The primary theme that concerns the work contained within the exhibition is the human psychologies’ innate need to transcend the isolation of individual existence. Particular focus is given to the destructive and violent expressions of that need from a societal perspective. This central premise underpins the attempt to explore various sociological phenomena, historical and contemporary, related to authoritarianism, conformity and armed conflict.
    • Matrimony, The Fall and A Moment in Time.

      McNaney, Nicky; University of Derby (2018-01)
      Drawings inspired by the nomadic German artist Martin Kippenberger’s Hotel Drawings and created for the Art on Hotel Note Paper exhibition, Visual Arts Centre, Scunthorpe,Lincolnshire.
    • Mermaids are always welcome

      McNaney, Nicky; University of Derby (The Tetley, 2017-03)
      Screen-printed Artists Book exhibited at the Contemporary Artists’ PAGES, Book Fair, The Tetley, Leeds.
    • Night Circus

      McNaney, Nicky; University of Derby (Oriel Davies Gallery, 2016-10)
      “Night Circus” (Screen-printed Artists Book) exhibited in the Imaginary worlds exhibition. Imaginary Worlds was an exhibition of artworks by 52 illustration and book artists from Wales, other parts of the UK, Europe and Australia.