• Quickening - A digital exhibition at Pickford House

      Templeton-Parker, Christine; Watson, Stephen; Fletcher, Jane; University of Derby (Derby Museums Trust, 2016-11-07)
      Quickening ‘The dream of motion haunts the visual arts from the classical period to the present day.’ (Linda Nead, 2007, The Haunted Gallery: Photography Film and Painting c.1900, Yale University Press, 45)) Quickening is a family of digital portraits, made using the latest RED camera technology. It seeks to tap into all that is uncanny about film and photography, using digital technology to blur the boundaries of the animate and inanimate, the past, and the ‘passed away’. Inspired by nineteenth century ‘photographer of souls’ Julia Margaret Cameron (1815-1879), Quickening explores the notion of ‘materialisation of the spirit’ as the photographed soul quickens from its arrested moment, to engage with the viewer in the present. Using subtle manipulation of frame speed and colour made possible by the use of RED technology, Quickening experiments with photographic portraiture and narrative, much as Cameron did with the new photographic technologies of her time.
    • Rabbit Chain and Run Rabbit Run

      McNaney, Nicki; University of Derby (Oriel Davies Gallery, 2016-10)
      Rabbit Chain and Run Rabbit Run” (Two Screen-prints) exhibited in the Imaginary worlds exhibition. Imaginary Worlds was an exhibition of artworks by 52 illustration and book artists from Wales, other parts of the UK, Europe and Australia.
    • Rabbit Chain and Run Rabbit Run 1

      McNaney, Nicki; University of Derby (2015-02)
      This work is one of a number of responses that have been inspired by and made about the village that I live in. The village has one remaining farm within the curtilage of the built environment and the villager’s occupations have drastically changed over the years. There was 480 acres under cultivation at the time of the Domesday Book and at one time there was thirty working farms recorded in the village. My images focus on the environment, the evolution of the land without the control of the farming community, and the consequences this has on nature & rural living. Exhibited at University of Derby, Nature Connections exhibition and Art via post exhibition at Arts at the Armory in Somerville, MA. USA
    • Radio 2.0: How Facebook is enhancing audience participation for Irish radio audiences.

      McMahon, Daithi; University of Limerick (Academic Conferences and Publishing International, 2014-07)
      As a traditional mass medium radio is proving its flexibility and resilience in an ever more digitalised mediascape by increasing its presence on one of the fastest growing digital platforms, Facebook. With the radio industry in Ireland as a case study, this project examines the use of Facebook by radio producers and their audiences as a medium for deeper interaction and explores the functions this contact serves for the audience member, for the radio producer, and for society as a whole. Based on recent findings, this doctoral research argues that radio producers are increasingly engaging with their audiences through Facebook for commercial reasons, in an effort to build audience loyalty and grow their audience share in a highly competitive industry. Radio audiences are following their favourite radio programmes on Facebook in growing numbers seeking an enhanced media experience and opportunities to exercise their agency as active audiences and participate in the on-air and online conversations. Furthermore, the evidence suggests that public spheres and virtual communities are created on radio station Facebook pages and that some users build social capital between one another through extended interaction. The convergence of radio with Facebook is thus allowing an old medium to remain competitive at a time when digital media is threatening the traditional mass media.The methodology involves both qualitative and quantitative research methods including interviews with radio producers and audience members combined with a survey of the latter, textual analysis of radio station Facebook pages and a longitudinal content analysis of Facebook interactivity across the Irish radio industry. The project is nearing completion and therefore this paper will present the main findings that demonstrate the capacity of radio as a medium to engage with and profit from the introduction of new digital technologies, particularly Facebook.
    • Razzle dazzle

      Fisher, Craig; Chambers, Louisa; Flint, Rob; University for the Creative Arts; Nottingham Trent University (2016-11)
      The collaborative exhibition, Razzle Dazzle takes as its starting point Dazzle Camouflage, credited to artist Norman Wilkinson where, ‘military vessels were painted with strong geometric patterns and bold contrasting colouration so as to misinform U-boat captains bent on attack. The intention was optical deception: to mislead the eye and manipulate visual perception.’ (Gil McElroy, The Uses of Abstraction). Artists Craig Fisher, Louisa Chambers and Rob Flint each employ pattern within their practice as a form of pictorial disruption, interruption and spatial collapse. Initially to start the dialogue each artist will work site-specifically by making work directly on the gallery walls. Over the duration of the exhibition each artist will develop work by responding to the space and each other; artworks will butt up against each other, they may be shown on top of each other making individual practices both indistinguishable and jarring. As the space begins to evolve, as well as adding, interjections will be made where artworks will be removed or displaced. The artists are interested in further crossovers, which will be made during a marked time frame, the possibilities of pattern disruptions and figure/ground painting relationships within the gallery space. Works in the exhibition are concealed within the overall dazzle effect of the installation producing interesting juxtapositions and correlations. The exhibition follows on from a public residency at the Harley Gallery in the East Midlands.
    • Re-enacting Palestine and the performance of credibility

      Hazou, Rand; University of New Zealand (2016-06)
    • 'Reality fragments' - Found footage, video collage and non-fiction

      Bosward, Marc; University of Derby (12/06/2015)
      Paper presented to the MeCSSA and Journal of Media Practice Symposium ‘Language/Voice’, Aberystwyth University, 12 June 2015
    • Rebirth: a light and sound show. Animation projection mapped onto the windows of Strutt’s North Mill

      Shore, Tim; Bosward, Marc; Poynton, Stuart; University of Derby (2014-03)
      Rebirth is a series of looped abstracted animations, made by Poynton and Shore, with sound by Bosward, that was projected onto the windows of the first floor and basement of Strutt’s North Mill Belper as part of the celebrations to mark the museum’s Summer Opening event. The work references the elemental forces that helped shape the mill including fire, water and iron. Strutt’s North Mill was built in 1804 and is one of the oldest surviving examples of an industrialised, iron framed ‘fire proof’ building. Animation sequences were constructed using a convoluted and slow process that draws on both digital and analogue practices. In constructing a ‘slow animation’ sequence the actual animation or movement is made visible to the animator. Through an engagement with a range of machine processes (both analogue and digital) the work is able to foreground the artificial nature of animation, commenting on both animation’s craft legacy and its constructed nature.
    • Recto Verso: redefining the sketchbook.

      Bartram, Angela; El-Bizri, Nader; Gittens, Douglas; University of Lincoln (Ashgate Publishing Ltd., 2014)
      Bringing together a broad range of contributors including art, architecture, and design academic theorists and historians, in addition to practicing artists, architects, and designers, this volume explores the place of the sketchbook in contemporary art and architecture. Drawing upon a diverse range of theories, practices, and reflections common to the contemporary conceptualisation of the sketchbook and its associated environments, it offers a dialogue in which the sketchbook can be understood as a pivotal working tool that contributes to the creative process and the formulation and production of visual ideas. Along with exploring the theoretical, philosophical, psychological, and curatorial implications of the sketchbook, the book addresses emergent digital practices by way of examining contemporary developments in sketchbook productions and pedagogical applications. Consequently, these more recent developments question the validity of the sketchbook as both an instrument of practice and creativity, and as an educational device. International in scope, it not only explores European intellectual and artistic traditions, but also intercultural and cross-cultural perspectives, including reviews of practices in Chinese artworks or Islamic calligraphy, and situational contexts that deal with historical examples, such as Roman art, or modern practices in geographical-cultural regions like Pakistan.
    • Recycled donkey.

      McNaney, Nicki; University of Derby (2017-01)
      A postcard created for the International Postcard Show encouraging artists across the globe to exchange their art.
    • REDO - Contemporary Art

      Jones, Rhiannon; Nottingham Trent University; Design School Kolding, Denmark (Cumulus International, 2017-05-31)
      For this paper presentation, Dr Jones discussed the collaborative work of the artists Traci Kelly and Rhiannon Jones, (Kelly + Jones), 2015 to the present, 2017. Considering how do we re-do practice by resisting the expectations of language, it forms part of a subversive investigation into writing as a visceral encounter and as an excavation of self and site – a mode of human extension into the world. In connection with the REDO conference theme of "how do we REDO our design education, our design practice, and our design research so that our knowledge comes to have an actual effect on how we live, from the micro level of the domestic to the macro level of politics? How do we train our students to become DOers and to confront the challenges that face the world in terms of social inclusion, climate/environment, and economic growth? How do we impact our disciplines and beyond? The REDO biannual Cumulus 2017 conference in Kolding aimed to playfully inspire, challenge and develop the role, relevance and scope of design, art and media in a global world with sustainability for people, planet and profit in mind. The overall aim of the conference is to create lasting impact in design and design education and initiate (future) actions." Cumulus, 2017. "For several years in Cumulus (an international art and design organization) I worked with Rhiannon Jones as I chaired the Contemporary Art Workshop. At my invitation she consistently presented projects and led group discussions. Her engaging presentations promoted diversity in art and design at our group meetings in Sweden, Portugal, Italy, France, and Denmark. After my tenure as chair of this workshop/committee, I nominated Dr Rhiannon Jones as Cumulus Contemporary Art Working Group chair person in 2019 – present". Dr Ann Albritton, Art History - Contemporary Issues Ringling College of Art & Design Sarasota, FL
    • Referencing web pages and e-journals.

      Bryson, David; University of Derby (2013-12)
      One of the areas that can confuse students and authors alike is how to reference web pages and electronic journals (e-journals). The aim of this professional development article is to go back to first principles for referencing and see how with examples these should be referenced.
    • Reflections in Anticipation of Loss

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (2021-09-08)
      There is a shadow that quietly, but progressively creeps upon us with advancing age, a sense of being unheard and increasingly cloaked with invisibility. Solitude and loneliness, which is so often a consequence for the elderly, has a deteriorating effect on health, which often goes unrepresented, unacknowledged, and not discussed. A domestic companion offers appeasement, and a dog gains significance where there is no other human present. The lightning talk focuses on the reflective and poignant stories of the anticipated loss of a pet dog told by participants in my artistic research project, Dogs and the Elderly. The project, made with participants from the Alzheimer’s Society’s ‘Memory Cafes’ in Nottingham and Lincolnshire, connects with those held in a companionable embrace with dogs. It offers personal and pertinent stories of the significance of end of live interspecies relationships to be told; it provides the opportunity for others to listen and hear those intimacies and understand the positive value such inter-species relationships bring. The conference presentation addresses and discuss the importance of domestic end of life human-dog relationships, and the anticipation and fear of loss to come. A video, containing the words spoken by participants, will play throughout to illustrate their sentiments.
    • Reflections on belongings and becomings; art, maternity and family activism.

      McCloskey, Paula; university of Derby (2017-05)
      An invited artist talk entitled 'Reflections on Belongings and Becomings; Art, Maternity and Family Activism' as part of AirSpace Gallery Soup kitchen Artist Talks. Here I talked about the entanglement of Art, Maternity and Activism, returning to the research questions: If maternity is taken to be a thinking apparatus, a concept, an encounter, as well as a lived experience what new insights might emerge from arts practice and art writing that explores the complex entanglements of ‘maternity’ (in its broadest sense) and art? as well as Can the 'family' be a site of resistance to dominant ideologies and of imagining collective alternative futures, through different kinds of collectivity, by thinking beyond 'family' to kinship/more than human/non-biologically based conceptions?
    • Report on a medium-scale three dimensional artificial soundscape rendition: research and development system

      Lennox, Peter; University of York (UK and Ireland Soundscape Community, 2002-11)
      A geodesic dome housing a 32Xspeaker <3rd order ambisonic system for Sound Art experimentation at the 2002 Maxis Festival
    • Rethinking live electronic music: a DJ perspective

      Vandemast-Bell, Paul; University of Derby (Routledge, 2013-06)
      The author critiques the conventional understanding of live electronic music through empirical research on his own DJ practice and investigates others working in the field. In reviewing the opinions of theorists and practitioners in both the live electronic music genre and DJ-ing he argues against the body/machine dialectic that has determined much of the thinking in the former. The author forms a notion of the DJ as a real-time composer working beyond traditional binary distinctions who brings the human body and machine into a mutual relationship. Through practice-led research he charts an investigation beginning in physical human gesture and culminating in digital machine repetition. He concludes that mechanical and digital repetition do not obscure human agency in the production of live works and that this concern is imaginary.
    • Revisiting the retrospective of the work of Jordan McKenzie.

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (20/04/2018)
      The act of art retrospective, specifically that placed within a museum or gallery, is to reflect on, and give knowledge of something past. A retroactive overview of a person’s artistic practice, the retrospective exhibition is backwards facing rather than future focused. As an act that normally specifies finiteness and conclusion a living artist’s retrospective produces an anomaly as a consequence. In 2016 I simultaneously staged the Alternative Document symposium and exhibition. This included Retrospective 2027 by Jordan McKenzie, a living artist, as a keynote performance in the symposium. Positioned as a keynote in the symposium rather than the exhibition it not only offered the retrospective as a representation of the artworks of the living, but also challenged traditional formats of structural placement. Situated within colloquialism rather than exhibition, the aim was to set it adrift from the gallery and the predominantly visual to open it to critical debate. This paper analyses an approach to retrospective that differs from the conventional, as one that is performed, gestural and event-based rather than static and exhibited in a gallery and includes my critical conversation with the artist. It asks what this means for the artwork, the documentary in performance and ephemeral practice, the archive, the exhibition and retrospective in McKenzie’s work. Presented in Documents, Alternatives: a symposium of artistic process and practice, BSAD (Bath), 20 April 2018. The symposium is staged simultaneously with the exhibition Documents, Alternatives (#3) at BSAD gallery, which is open to the public 20th April – 1st May 2018. The exhibition and symposium are part of the Alternative Document, a project by Dr. Angela Bartram, Associate Professor and Head of Arts Research, at University of Derby.
    • The revival of the ancient technique of printing with mordants and dyeing in bi-colourants to achieve contemporary poly-chromic designs

      Wells, Kate; Churn, Kate; University of Derby (NOVA University of Lisbon Campus Caparica / Caparica Portugal, 25/10/2018)
      This paper explores the creation of a range of sustainable patterned fabrics by employing various Bio-colorants (natural dyes) in combination with a range of mordants that have a lesser impact upon the environment to create a poly-chromatic design within single dyeing process. Practice based research was undertaken into dyeing and printing with Madder, Logwood, Weld and Woad or Indigo in combination with a selection of mordants Alum, Copper Acetate, Iron Acetate and Tannins onto a range of fabric bases which includes the new regenerated fibres alongside traditional natural ones as a sustainable option (1, 2). Mordants that have been used from ancient times produce a pattern during the dyeing process. By looking at these historical (3, 4) and traditional applications (5) from across the globe, it was hoped that a more sustainable method of patterning either through printed (screen and block), stencilled or hand-painted techniques could be designed. According to Robinson (6): Pliny the Elder (AD 23-79), writing of the ancient Egyptians, stated that, ‘Garments are painted in Egypt in a wonderful manner, the white clothes being first coated, not with colours but with drugs which absorb the colours. Although the dyeing liquid is one colour, the garment is dyed several colours according to the different properties of the drugs which have been applied to the different parts: nor can this be washed out’ It is thought that this passage was describing madder dye alongside as the various mordants – alum, iron salts and copper salts as they were known at that time (7). Since this ancient time, the application of natural dyes evolved over the centuries into an advanced form of dyeing as this was only form of permanently colouring fabrics until the advent of synthetic dyes by Perkins in 1856. The ‘Art of Dyeing’ became a highly secretive and protected practice with the formation of Dyers Guilds from the 14th c. The technique of the application of different mordants to create more than one colour evolved within the Far East employed initially to produce the ‘Indienne mania’ (Chintz) madder dyed calicos of the 17th c. and 18th c. and later with the development of ‘Turkey Red’ prints, the secrete of which remained undisclosed until the late 18th c. (7). (1) Garcia. 2012, Natural Dye Workshop: Colors Of Provence Using Sustainable Methods, London: Studio Galli. (2) Dean, J, & Casselman, K. 1999, Wild Colour, London: Mitchell Beazley. (3) Bird. 1875. The Dyers Handbook. USA. (4) Hummel, J.J. 1885. The Dyeing of Textile Fabrics. London: Cassell & Company Ltd (5) Bilgrami, N. 1990. Singh jo Ajrak. Pakistan: Department of Culture and Tourism Government of Sindh. (6) Robinson, S. 1969. A History of Dyed Textiles, London: W & J Makckay & Co Ltd. (7) Chenciner, R. 2001. Madder Red: A History of Luxury and Trade. Richmond: Cuzon Press. (8) Storey, J. 1992 The Thames and Hudson Manual of Textile Printing. London: Thames and Hudson.
    • Riddum: the sacred word of Sancha Prasad rai, shaman of the Himalayas

      Nicoletti, Martino; Gasgini, Fabrizio; University of Derby, School of Art and Design (Castelvecchi Editore - Roma, 2005)
      A book devoted to the mythology of the Kulunge Rai, an ethnic group settled in the East Nepal. The work is enriched by a large series of photos.
    • Riot 1831 1958 1981 2011 in Nottingham.

      Jones, Rhiannon; Nottingham Trent University (New Art Exchange, ADP Riot Tour and L-13.org Prophetic Promotions Press., 2016-09)
      In 2012 New Art Exchange opened its new season with a specially developed session considering the impact of the Nottingham riots one year on. Rhiannon Jones was commissioned by New Art Exchange, Synapse Arts and Nottingham City Council, to design a research project to facilitate conversations between voices of the hard to reach, local community members, youth groups and academics to discuss the effect that the riots has had on the people of Nottingham. This article was commissioned by New Art Exchange 5 years on, in 2016, was commissioned review the impact of Rhiannon Jones' 2012 project Mediated Riots, in order to revisit the lasting impact of the methodological findings and reflect on the research questions that the project raised. It questions the value of reflexivity, and the politics of socially and dialogically engaged research projects. The article was included in the publication that toured with ADP Riot Tour to 36 sites across the UK on a nationwide tour. The ADP was shown outside Nottingham's New Art Exchange as part of their exhibitions 'A Rebel Scene' + 'Fighting Walls' exploring civil resistance, activist space and political defiance. As part of the stop Jimmy Cauty and L-13's Steve Lowe took part in a talk describing the process of how the ADP was made and how the ADP Riot Tour went from the word RIOT on a map to reality. The ADP was in Nottingham from 26th September - 10th October.