• Nature Connections

      Jinks, Cameron; University of Derby (2015-09)
      The highlands are now relatively empty with only about 20% of Scotland’s population living in the region, looking at the bleakness of the landscape it is easy to imagine that this was always the case. However, some of the sites I photograph, Aoneadh Mor for example, were forcibly cleared of their tenant farmers in the nineteenth century to make way for more profitable sheep. The result of these, often brutal, ‘clearances’ was a reduction in the population from about 50% of Scotland’s total to 20%. Mary Cameron's eyewitness account of Aoneadh Mor's forced evictions reached a rapt British readership via the magazine "Good Words", and had an enormous impact on developing unease at what had been done in the name of progress. "The hissing of the fire on the flag of the hearth as they were drowning it reach my heart", she said, "The aged woman, the mother of my husband was then alive, weak and lame. James carried her on his back, in a creel." On the ridge of Sithean na Raiplach, refugees destined for Glasgow and the colonies turned for a last look. "The houses were already stripped. The bleat of the big sheep was on the mountain." Aoneadh Mor, the village of the Cameron highlanders, was cleared to make way for sheep.
    • The new apothecary's cabinet II

      White, Christine; Oddey, Alison; University of Derby; Nottingham Trent University (2015-09-11)
      The new apothecary's cabinet II. Nature Connections Festival and Exhibition, Markeaton Gallery, University of Derby, Derby, 11 September 2015 - 29 January 2016
    • Ngland: Exposure Festival

      Harris, Philip; University of Derby (Exposure Festival, 2020-02-03)
      This short film is a companion work to A Profound Difference and presents a visual meditation on the political events and social environment that arose due to the UK Referendum on EU Membership. The film was made with a clockwork 16mm camera, centred on an England flag, flown in the garden of a suburban house in the Midlands, England. The film consists of an entire reel of 16mm cine film, with no cuts or edits. The film was made with the camera in a fixed position with a change in the frame rate to suggest a sense of misplaced elegance in the slow-motion footage, against erratic action and confusion in the fast motion sections as the flag becomes tangled on the pole that supports it. The legend “ENGLAND” never quite reveals itself in full, with the “E” remaining partially concealed throughout. The film has been hand-processed and is presented with all the faults, glitches and mistakes as evidence of the physicality of film. The work was exhibited in two parts for Exposure Festival 2020, Calgary. A large-scale sequence of scanned sections of film was exhibited at 621 Gallery, University of Calgary. A digital transfer of the film was exhibited at Calgary Contemporary. Where the projected film presents the flag though the cinematic illusion of time and space, the scanned segments decompose the film into discreet fragments. The behaviour of the flag, with the faults, marks and scratches that occurred through hand processing the film, act as metaphors for the impact of this political process on the social fabric of the country. The work was supported by a public presentation at Calgary Contemporary, 3rd February, where I explored the use of analogue media for exploring issues of politics. The presentation provided the foundation for the published paper.
    • Night Circus

      McNaney, Nicki; University of Derby (Oriel Davies Gallery, 2016-10)
      “Night Circus” (Screen-printed Artists Book) exhibited in the Imaginary worlds exhibition. Imaginary Worlds was an exhibition of artworks by 52 illustration and book artists from Wales, other parts of the UK, Europe and Australia.
    • Night Circus; An artists publication

      McNaney, Nicki; University of Derby (2015-10)
      The Sheffield 5th International Artist’s Book Prize and exhibition showcased over 200 books selected from nearly 400 individual entries coming from 42 different countries. The publication was developed to explore my use of narrative and sequencing using screen-printing and collage. Characters were created initially using the medium of mono-printing and then collaged by hand and created into various colour separations to take forward into screen-print. The objective of the project was to explore the surreal nature of the narrative and create characters, and an environment that depicted this within the restrictions of the traditional print media and book format.
    • The Night Siren 1, The Night Siren 2 & The Night Siren 3

      McNaney, Nicki; University of Derby (Surface Gallery, 2017-01)
      A set of screen-printed postcards, The International Postcard Show, Surface Gallery, Nottingham.
    • Nightbreed - the cabal cut

      Cherrington, Russell; University of Derby (Seraphim Films / Morgan Creek Films, 2017-12-01)
      Nightbreed is a 1990 Fantasy/Horror Film created by Polymath Clive Barker. In 2012 Russell Cherrington with the aid of Jimmi Johnson took all the available film elements, work prints, original cinema release and the 2nd draft script. The question was can the film be recreated and would it have an impact and a meaning in 2012. The finished film was screened at over 50 Film Festivals around the world from 2013 to 2015. It led to the Occupy Midian movement with over 10,000 follwers on Twitter, Facebook and the Internet. The film was restored into a Directors Cut in 2015 and finally in 2017 the Cabal Cut was released on Blu Ray.
    • Nomadi dell’invisibile: l’autosacrificio rituale del chöd nel Bön tibetano

      Nicoletti, Martino (Edizioni Exòrma - Roma, 2010)
      In the heart of the Himalayas, officiants belonging to Tibet’s ancient religion, Bön, undertake a long ritual pilgrimage through wild and inhospitable places inhabited by mountain deities, water genii, ferocious demons and dangerous ghosts. As the pilgrimage unfolds, having attracted the spirits’ attention with wildly provocative acts and evoking their presence by reciting a ritual text and the sound of magical musical instruments, the practitioners celebrate the meditative sacrifice of their own body (chöd), offered to a whole host of invisible beings as spiritual nourishment during a singular ritual banquet. Texts, diary excerpts and photos recount this archaic ritual, deeply rooted in the notion of Universal Compassion and chiefly aimed at severing the practitioner’s attachment to his physical body and overcoming identification with his own illusory ego. The work is also enriched by the sacred ritual text "The Secret Wisdom Ḍākinī" (Khandro Sangba Yeshe), translated for this volume by Geshe Gelek Jinpa, and by a DVD containing a short Super-8 film by the author, as well as the liturgical chöd chant performed by the monks of the bönpo monastery Triten Norbutse in Nepal.
    • The Nomadic sacrifice: the Chöd pilgrimage among the Bönpo of Dolpo (western Nepal)

      Nicoletti, Martino; University of Derby, School of Art and Design (Vajra Publications - Kathmandu, 2013)
      In the heart of the Himalayas, officiants belonging to Tibet’s ancient religion, Bön, undertake a long ritual pilgrimage through wild and inhospitable places inhabited by mountain deities, water genii, ferocious demons and dangerous ghosts. As the pilgrimage unfolds, having attracted the spirits’ attention with wildly provocative acts and evoking their presence by reciting a ritual text and the sound of magical musical instruments, the practitioners celebrate the meditative sacrifice of their own body (chöd), offered to a whole host of invisible beings as spiritual nourishment during a singular ritual banquet. Texts, diary excerpts and photos recount this archaic ritual, deeply rooted in the notion of Universal Compassion and chiefly aimed at severing the practitioner’s attachment to his physical body and overcoming identification with his own illusory ego. The work is also enriched by the sacred ritual text "The Secret Wisdom Ḍākinī" (Khandro Sangba Yeshe), translated for this volume by Geshe Gelek Jinpa, and by a DVD containing a short Super-8 film by the author, as well as the liturgical chöd chant performed by the monks of the bönpo monastery Triten Norbutse in Nepal.The book is the English edition of the work: Nicoletti, M., (2010), "Nomadi dell'invisibile: L’autosacrificio rituale del chöd nel Bön tibetano", Roma: Exorma.
    • The non/inhuman within: beyond the biopolitical intrauterine imaginary

      McCloskey, Paula; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2021)
      In the context of the increasingly entangled, devastating markers of this time (climate crises, unfettered capitalism, tribal nationalism, increasing borders, species extinction), this paper stakes a claim for the importance of attending to the human intrauterine as a way to connect with non/inhuman alterity. It is argued that the intrauterine phenomena, as a process experienced by all humans, has a part to play in understanding “humanness”, human connectedness to nonhumanness, which can be used as part of a wider strategy to re-imagine collaboratively and with co-response-ability ways to live and survive within multispecies landscapes. Methodologically, Karen Barad’s diffractive approach is used to explore the intrauterine as a time-space of affect and connection between the human and nonhuman. With this approach, the paper assembles selected philosophers, alongside a re-reading of Mary Kelly’s Antepartum (1973) in the proposal of an intrauterine imaginary unhitched from the biopolitical. In doing so, it seeks to re-draw some of the boundaries around the intrauterine imaginary, to propose how paying attention to the non/inhuman of the human intrauterine might generate images and ideas of connections and co-response-ability beyond birth, between humans and more than humans.
    • Not a decorator.

      Watts, Lisa; University of Derby (Various venues, 2017)
      Not a Decorator researches curatorial models for performance art in the white cube gallery space for the regular day-time viewers. Not a Decorator is three exhibitions and is the second stage of two stages in this research. In this second stage I collaborated with the curators on how best to show my performances and videos and the resulting exhibition was the result of the dialogue. An 'outside eye/ researcher' was employed, Joanne Lee, who is a Senior Lecturer at Sheffield Hallam University in Graphic design. She interviewed the curators, artists and myself throughout the three exhibitions. There will be a symposium held later in 2018 titled, Blink that will discuss the findings.
    • Nottingham Castle Open 2014

      Fisher, Craig; University for the Creative Arts, Canterbury; Nottingham Trent University (Nottingham Castle Museum & Art Gallery, 2014)
      Fisher was selected by Sean Edwards (Artist), Antony Micallef (Artist) and Kirsty Ogg (Director, Bloomberg New Contemporaries) to participate in the Nottingham Castle Open exhibition (2014). The selectors were asked to draw together a body of work that represented the wide range of creative practice taking place in the east-midlands region, from style and medium, to subject and technical ability. From the large number of applications comprising 1,251 works submitted by 447 artists, the selectors finally drew together works from 33 artists to include in this year’s Open exhibition. Fisher was selected to show iterations of his ongoing ‘Rioter’ and ‘Homemade Devices’ series. Selected Artists include: Margie Andrew-Reichelt, Chloe Ashley, Alan Baker, Shaun Belcher, Jackie Berridge, Hasret Brown, Lotti Closs, Daniel Cowlam, Sumiko Eadon, Craig Fisher, Joanna Fursman, Adam Grüning, Jack Holden, Abi Hubbard, Melanie Jakubson, Geoff Diego Litherland, Andrew Macara, Danica Maier, Tracy-Ann Marrison, Craig David Parr, Faith Pearson, Adrian Pearsons, James Politano, Simon Raven & Jim Brouwer, Reactor, David Severn, Corinna Spencer, Sarah Terry, Oliver Tirré, Lois Wallace, Corey Whyte, Jodie Wingham
    • Now For Tomorrow II

      Fisher, Craig; University for the Creative Arts, Canterbury; Nottingham Trent University (Nottingham Castle Museum and Art Gallery, 2016)
      Nottingham Castle Museum and Art Gallery is pleased to present the exhibition, Now for Tomorrow II which looks at some of the contemporary art and craft acquired by Nottingham Castle Museum & Art Gallery since 2010, thanks to the support of individuals, funders and charitable trusts such as the Art Fund, Contemporary Art Society and the V&A Purchase Grant Fund. Before any new work is acquired, consideration is given to how it will sit alongside the existing collection, making connections across time and between different media and disciplines. The recent contemporary acquisitions are therefore shown here in the company of mid to late 20th century works that place the new arrivals in a wider context. Fisher’s work ‘Rioters’ (2014) acquired during the Nottingham Castle Open 2014 as winner of the Purchase Prize will be included in the exhibition. Now for Tomorrow II artists include: Marion Adnams, Craigie Aitchison, Phyllida Barlow, Helena Ben-Zenou, Melanie Bilenker, Richard Billingham, Jon Burgerman, Helen Chadwick, Louisa Chambers, Alice Channer, Thomas Joshua Cooper, Giovanni Corvaja, Craig Fisher, Tina Hage, Tristram Hillier, Permindar Kaur, Christina Mackie, Nick Mobbs, Anne Morrell, Yelena Popova, Bettina Speckner, Ian Stephenson, Sam Taylor-Johnson, Shizuka Yokomizo
    • Olivia Dunham and the new frontier in fringe

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (McFarland, 2019-07-12)
      From the Star Wars expanded universe to Westworld, the science fiction western has captivated audiences for more than fifty years. These twelve new essays concentrate on the female characters in the contemporary science fiction western, addressing themes of power, agency, intersectionality and the body. Discussing popular works such as Fringe, Guardians of the Galaxy and Mass Effect, the essayists shed new light on the gender dynamics of these beloved franchises, emphasizing inclusion and diversity with their critical perspectives.
    • OneConversation with S.H.E.D: Designing in Dialogue

      Jones, Rhiannon; Slabbert, Barend; University of Derby (2021-04-22)
      This research workshop will provide an opportunity to find out more about S.H.E.D. Together, we will discuss what a bespoke configuration would look like, where it would be placed and what you want to see happen in it, to best serve you and your community. We will do this through discussion and watch as your design comes to life on screen in 3D animation, placing co-creation at the heart of what we do, to support the shedding of preconceptions about people and place.
    • Opening up the debate: Irish radio, Facebook, and the creation of transnational cultural public spheres.

      McMahon, Daithi; University of Derby (Transcript Verlag, 02/10/2018)
      Radio has become an increasingly digitised medium in recent years with a growing online presence becoming ever more integral to the medium’s output and identity. Furthermore, it has become integral to radio stations’ audience recruitment and retention strategies. While radio has long been a platform for on-air public debate and discourse, the limitations of technology always meant that only a limited number of listeners could take part. The largest social network site, Facebook, now provides the infrastructure for public spheres to exist online which means a much wider audience can participate and contribute to discussions and debates including the extensive Irish diaspora – which has grown significantly as a cohort since 2008 due to mass emigration – making it a transnational phenomenon. Using the Irish radio industry and Radio Kerry as a case study this research found that although some instances of traditional Habermasian public spheres exist on radio station Facebook pages, such instances were very limited. Instead audiences are participating in what closely resemble cultural public spheres (McGuigan 2005) where the topics of discussion are of a cultural, social or emotional nature, eschewing debates on current affairs/public issues. This chapter looks at the use of Facebook for audience recruitment and retention from an Irish context and within that is focused on the local commercial radio station Radio Kerry. The methodology included textual analysis of Facebook page content, interviews with industry professionals, an audience survey and one in-depth interview with an audience member.
    • Operating theatre photography for orthopaedics and aesthetic surgery.

      Bryson, David; University of Derby (2011-06)
      The aim of this paper is to examine the author's personal experience and practice in operating theatre photography. The ways of working are personal to the author but hopefully will help others in undertaking this type of work.
    • Operating theatre photography for orthopaedics and aesthetic surgery.

      Bryson, David; University of Derby (2011-06)
      The aim of this paper is to examine the author's personal experience and practice in operating theatre photography. The ways of working are personal to the author but hopefully will help others in undertaking this type of work.
    • Operating theatre photography for personal injury cases.

      Bryson, David; University of Derby (1999-06)
      Photography, including records taken in theatre, has an important role to play in the legal settlement of personal injury claims. Photographs taken immediately prior to an operation in the anaesthetic room or during the operation provide valuable evidence for civil litigation. The type of operations at which personal injury photographs should be taken range from emergency surgery and minor operations to exploratory or reparative surgery. The value of pre-operative photography is demonstrated in two examples of orthopaedic surgery for personal injury claims.