• Making a rock

      Locke, Caroline; Swann, Debra; University of Derby; The Academy in Antwerp; Nottingham Trent University (N/A, 16/03/2016)
      This collaborative project with Caroline Locke and Debra Swann was developed through a series of residencies at Primary, Nottingham and Summer Lodge at Nottingham Trent University 2016. The first exhibition at The Collectiv National Gallery, Antwerp, Belgium in 2016 and then developed further as part of an exhibition at Primary, Nottingham 2017. Making a Rock is an ongoing durational performance that attends to the physical construction of a large-scale object (a cardboard ‘rock’) embracing the potential of duration, temporality, liveness and performativity. Using photography, video and sound to document this process of making, the enquiry expands the vocabulary of sculptural practice through the focus of the durational aspects of making and the idea of the sculptural work in flux. This enquiry explores the process of making and collecting data. It investigates how we understand objects and sound and the properties and qualities they possess. Through the artist/object relationship a focus on the evolution of an object and the artist’s process is examined. Rock Music is a composition created using sounds taken from recordings of the artist Debra Swann making a huge cardboard rock. The artists have explored the different kinds of data gathered from their combined artistic practices. They extract the data and rework it in live performances and exhibited works. Rock Music explores sound in relation to domestic and labour intensive activity. The composition is cut onto a vinyl record which is played over and over within the exhibition space. The sound of the activity becomes abstract and otherworldly when amplified. Mundane working involves repetition – a strange rhythm develops – a kind of chant.
    • Making shaking shifting pouring sawing

      Locke, Caroline; Swann, Debra; University of Derby; Nottingham Trent University; Collectiv National Gallery, Antwerp; The Royal Academy of Fine Arts Antwerp (Primary Studios Nottingham, 2017-02)
      Making Shaking Shifting Pouring Sawing is an installation, exhibition and live Performance. The work explores the idea of repeated and intensive labour and the data gathered in relation to artistic and domestic processes. The exhibits and performances feature made and found objects and the data collected in relation to repeated activities whilst making or working with the objects. The data is retrieved as sound, physical data, digital imagery and animation. These elements are exposed as part of live performances and exhibited kinetic sculptures and devices. The project involved collaborative research explored by Caroline Locke and Debra Swann and was initially developed through a series of residencies at Primary, Nottingham and Summer lodge at Nottingham Trent University 2016. The first exhibition was in Antwerp, Belgium, at Collectiv National, Antwerp Gallery in 2016 (Collectiv National, was founded by Janna Beck and is linked to The Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, Belgium). An exhibition and live performance at Primary, Nottingham followed in 2017. As an extension of Locke’s residency at Nottingham University, based across the Mixed Reality Lab and Horizon Digital Economy Institute, Locke and Swann worked with Assistant Professor Max Wilson and Horia Maior, who equipped Debra with a brain scanning device known as Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) in order to record mental workload levels during her creative making processes. Visualisations of the recorded brain data were projected as part of a live performance and exhibition. The brain data was also used to control various devices as part of the exhibition. For example: a motor uses the rate of brain activity to speed up and slow down a record deck. Rock Music is a composition created using sounds taken from recordings of the artist Debra Swann making a huge cardboard rock. The ‘music’ was cut onto a vinyl disc and played on the brain data controlled device. Rock Music explores sound in relation to domestic and labour intensive activity – The brain effort during the making activity controls the speed at which the record plays during the performances and exhibitions. Shaking Shelves is a kinetic sculpture which is also part of the live performance and exhibition. The brain effort during a cleaning and sweeping process controls the speed at which the motor attached to a shelving unit spins. The shelves are loaded with domestic items and the vibration and movement of the motor causes the shelves to vibrate and the items to shake and sometimes fall. The extended Performing Data research is funded by the Arts Council and explores ideas around body rhythms and physical data in connection with labour, multi-tasking and women's work. Locke is interested in capturing data and using it to control kinetic sculptures within an immersive environment.
    • Manifest destiny, violence and transcendence

      Bosward, Marc; University of Derby (09/09/2011)
      My principal area of interest is using digital media within a cross-disciplinary methodology that incorporates drawing, painting, collage, typography, moving image and writing.The primary theme that concerns the work contained within the exhibition is the human psychologies’ innate need to transcend the isolation of individual existence. Particular focus is given to the destructive and violent expressions of that need from a societal perspective. This central premise underpins the attempt to explore various sociological phenomena, historical and contemporary, related to authoritarianism, conformity and armed conflict.
    • Manifest destiny, violence and transcendence – an artist’s statement

      Bosward, Marc; University of Derby (University of Salford Press, 2012)
      My principal area of interest is using digital media within a cross-disciplinary methodology that incorporates drawing, painting, collage, typography, moving image and writing.The primary theme that concerns the work contained within the exhibition is the human psychologies’ innate need to transcend the isolation of individual existence. Particular focus is given to the destructive and violent expressions of that need from a societal perspective. This central premise underpins the attempt to explore various sociological phenomena, historical and contemporary, related to authoritarianism, conformity and armed conflict.
    • The Marion Adnams project

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (Derby City Council, 2020-03)
      This magazine article explores the significance of Marion Adnams as an artist from Derby who can be celebrated for her work and her status as a woman artist in the context of Derby’s International Women’s Day celebrations. It also showcases the Marion Adnams Project and the extent to which profiling this kind of work both raises awareness of Adnams and her work as well as the research activity currently being undertaken.
    • Marion Adnams symposium

      University of Derby; Derby Museum and Art Gallery; Forde, Teresa (07/03/2018)
      A unique opportunity to further explore the life and work of Marion Adnams, including the exhibition of Marion Adnams' work and her involvement in the Midland Group, as well as broader linked themes, such as the representation of women artists.
    • Matches.

      O'Connor, Sean; McMahon, Daithi; University of Derby (Newstalk 106-108FM, 21/03/2015)
      Matches is the story of Tom, a recovering alcoholic looking for love in a world of dating apps, social media and the ever-present lure of alcohol. Exploring this mysterious sub-culture, Tom discovers some of the thrills and pitfalls of the modern dating scene. Tom Brody is a Dublin man in his late-thirties recovering from alcoholism. Tom's recent sobriety has brought many improvements. He is happier, healthier and getting on better with his family. The one area he finds more difficult is dating. Without the reliable meeting place of the pub, Tom finds meeting women more complicated than ever in a social scene still dominated by drinking. Furthermore, without the traditional 'Dutch courage', Tom feels more than a little awkward approaching the opposite sex sober. A friend introduces Tom to Quiver, the latest dating app for everything from lifetime relationships to random hookups. Along the way he conquers his awkwardness with social media and discovers some strange rules and peculiarities of the online dating world. Tom's initial success on the single scene pushes him to take ever greater risks with his sobriety as he encounters the pitfalls of keeping his history a secret. Ultimately Tom learns that being honest with himself is as important as being honest with others and that meeting his ideal match is about more than a perfect dating profile.
    • The material-discursive border & territorial-apparatuses {the Eile project}

      McCloskey, Paula; Vardy, Sam; University of Derby (Architectural Association of Ireland, 2020)
      Through our trans-disciplinary practice, a place, of their own , and one specific project based at the UK border with the Irish Republic, we discover, occupy and create (alternate) 'field conditions' of various kinds. Our ongoing art and spatial research in The Eile Project draws together different bodies of knowledge, experience and practice; from art, architecture, urbanism, philosophy, and science, to create new imaginaries and cartographies of the border. This is a particularly apposite time for such an endeavour - as the UK's protracted and contentious manoeuvres to leave the EU create renewed tensions and uncertainties at the Irish Border, and borders and their most brutal and basic spatial manifestation of the wall are increasingly being built around the world, physically and in the collective imagination.
    • Matrimony, The Fall and A Moment in Time.

      McNaney, Nicki; University of Derby (2018-01)
      Drawings inspired by the nomadic German artist Martin Kippenberger’s Hotel Drawings and created for the Art on Hotel Note Paper exhibition, Visual Arts Centre, Scunthorpe,Lincolnshire.
    • Medical Ephemera; A series of six screen-printed illustrations

      McNaney, Nicki; Allanson-Smith, Tracy; University of Derby (2015-03)
    • Memories of our youth: the viral spread of radio station Facebook posts

      McMahon, Daithí; University of Derby (University of Westminster Press, 2020-03-17)
      Radio and social media have developed a strong relationship in Ireland since the explosion in popularity of the latter from 2008 onward. Although the convergence of radio with Facebook in Ireland has allowed radio stations to reach wider audiences, some stations have been much more successful than others at achieving this. In this article the author presents a case study of Beat, a regional commercial radio station targeting the ‘digitally native’ (Palfrey and Gasser, 2010) millennial 15–34-year-old market, and one of the Irish Radio Industry’s most successful viral media instigators. During the period of study, 2011–2016, Beat was found to be very successful at engaging its audience through bespoke material that connected emotionally with the cultural community. The success of this viral reach helped the station grow its online followers to numbers that far outnumbered their actual listenership. In this article the author presents an analysis of the viral posts that feature childhood toys as the subject matter and explore why these pieces ‘went viral’. Using the generational theories of Mannheim (1952) and Strauss and Howe (1991) among others to frame the argument, the author posits that users share media texts which connect with them emotionally and by enjoying this material with others are unified as an affective community of individuals. This experience brings the group closer together and closer to the radio station. I also touch on the power of nostalgia as a factor in the viral spread of media texts. This research employed several research methods: in-depth interviews with radio industry professionals, an online survey of radio listeners/online users of Beat, textual analysis of Beat’s Facebook page, direct observation of radio producers and content analysis of social media growth.
    • Mermaids are always welcome

      McNaney, Nicki; University of Derby (The Tetley, 2017-03)
      Screen-printed Artists Book exhibited at the Contemporary Artists’ PAGES, Book Fair, The Tetley, Leeds.
    • Micro

      Fisher, Craig; University of Derby (AIR Gallery, Altrincham, 2019)
      Fisher was selected to participate in the group exhibition, Micro at AIR Gallery which was an open theme exhibition of over 100 small works by rising stars in contemporary art, working across a vast range of media. Fisher exhibited a number of ‘Homemade Devices’ which were highly commended by exhibition selectors.
    • A Mixed History: Colliding Realities and the Hybrid Aesthetic

      Bosward, Marc; University of Derby (31/05/2016)
      With reference to historiography, the paper will ask how found footage can be manipulated to create alternate histories that challenge orthodox, ‘grand’ narratives within a hybrid aesthetic that foregrounds the diversity of its components, producing deliberate stylistic and ontological discontinuities. The practice echoes the ubiquity and malleability of video material in contemporary communications and media and examines the reliability and authenticity of the video image as a historical document. The work interrogates appropriation strategies that decontextualize and recontextualise found footage as a method of ideological interruption, releasing the mutable, multiple meanings that accumulate and shift in the confluence of competing discourses.
    • Modes of spectating

      White, Christine; Oddey, Alison; University of Derby; Nottingham Trent University (University of Chicago Press, 2009)
      Modes of Spectating investigates the questions posed by new artistic and technological mediums on the viewer experience. These new visual tools influence not only how spectators view, but also how what they view determines what artists create. Alison Oddey and Christine White analyze how gaming and televisual media and entertainment are used by young people, and the resulting psychological challenges of understanding how viewers navigate these virtual worlds and surroundings. This multidisciplinary approach brings together ideas and examples from gaming art, photography, sculpture, and performance; it will be a valuable text for scholars of both media and art.
    • The Mountain of dead selves

      Poynton, Stuart; Bradburn, John; University of Derby; University of Worcestershire (Vivid Projects, 2016-06-10)
      CONSTRUCTING THE SELF: DAVID BOWIE 10 JUNE – 11 JUNE 2016, 12-5 Constructing The Self is comprised of new art works, music and audience participation, led by the Black Hole Club group of Midlands artists in celebration of the creative life of David Bowie. Put on your red shoes and dance the blues as we explore Bowie’s world. Starman, iconoclast, Blackstar: David Bowie remains the ultimate self constructed pop icon. ‘The Mountain of Dead Selves’ is a six panel video work exploring the psychic states at play in the construction of Bowie’s 1976 album, Station to Station. The work explores Bowie as mystery school as much as art school.
    • Moving Landscapes

      Andrews-Roberts, Chas; Squires, Barry; University of Derby (2016)
      Moving Landscapes – breaking away from the traditional ‘landscape stills’, using moving-image & sound. Exhibition / Installation type work. In addition, the potential use of Olfactics (sense of smell) within the installation. How might the use of moving-image / sound / smell, extend the static photographic form? How can the spectator interact with the exhibit? Interested in investigating if the viewer’s physiological state changes in any way whilst viewing / interacting with the work (blood pressure etc), and to see if the work provokes a sense of relaxation.
    • Music as artificial environment: Spatial, embodied multimodal experience

      Lennox, Peter; University of Derby (Routledge, 26/04/2017)
      This chapter is a speculative exploration of the near-future possibilities of spatial music. Technologically, we can control many hundreds of loudspeakers and, conceivably, many thousands. What would we do with them? Here, music is considered as a particular example of arti cial information environments, with consequences for the perception of space. Arti cial information environments are those environments in which information transactions are governed by design. The distinction is clear in comparison with natural environments, but a ner distinction can be drawn between man-made environments (such as buildings), where some information transactions are haphazard, and information environments whose main purpose is to display information.
    • My loss is my loss

      Williams, Rhiannon; University of Derby (2014-07)
      UK touring exhibition developed by University of Manchester with AHRC funding. My Loss is My Loss (patchwork of used lottery tickets) was selected for exhibition. My Loss is My Loss was illustrated with critical commentary in the book accompanying this exhibition: P. Knight, P. Crosthwaite and N. Marsh (2014) Show Me the Money: The Image of Finance 1700 to the Present. Manchester University Press. It was illustrated again by the AHRC in their report The Impact of AHRC Research April 2014 – March 2015, p. 17.
    • Mythologies, Identities and Territories of Photography: Forever//Now

      Marmalade, Gemma; Harris, Philip; University of Derby (Cambridge Scholars, 2020-12-17)
      This book brings together essays by both experienced and emerging researchers, photographic artists, and curators exploring themes such as ethnicity, gender, materiality, the archive, memory, age, national identity, and technologies, with several papers discussing creative responses to the UK’s departure from the European Union. In addition, it includes a paper by Martin Barnes, Senior Curator of Photography at the Victoria and Albert Museum, on the work of industrial photographer, Maurice Broomfield. The book will appeal to students, academics, photographic artists, curators, and those with an interest in art, photography, photographic history and theory. It includes black and white illustrations throughout, alongside a generous selection of colour plates, including portfolios by photographers Craig Easton, for the project SIXTEEN, and the works of industrial photographer Maurice Broomfield.