• L'uomo che dialogava con il coyote: una breve incursione sul tema «Joseph Beuys e sciamanesimo»

      Nicoletti, Martino; University of Derby, School of Art and Design (Edizioni Exòrma - Roma, 2011)
    • Land matters

      James, Jeremy; O'Connor, Denis (2012)
      An illustrated catalogue documenting a site specific sculpture project based at Ilam Park, Staffordshire, England in 2012
    • Layers of meaning, layers of truth: fragmented histories and composited video collage

      Bosward, Marc; University of Derby (Royal College of Art, 14/05/2016)
      The paper will present a body of ongoing practice-based research that interrogates the interface of live-action and animation, specifically, how found footage as an indexical element of lived experience functions within the aesthetic of a constructed ‘other’ world. Particular focus is given to how video collage, containing found footage components composed in the spatial as well as temporal dimensions, construct non-fiction explorations of the socio-historical world from an ontological perspective. The research explores how found footage elements are deployed to address themes relating to memory and history, with regard to how collective impressions of history are constituted and socially assimilated.
    • Layers, traces and gaps: Collage, found footage and the contested past

      Bosward, Marc; University of Derby (23/06/2017)
      Critical realism is an anti-reductionist approach that asserts the independence of an external world whilst accepting that knowledge of that world is socially constructed and transient. It offers an intermediate position that reconciles the binary opposition of objectivism and subjectivism, challenging the ‘false choice’ (Lovell, 1981) between empiricist and idealist ontologies. In recognising the dense complexity of being and the social world, it advances a stratified reality comprised of co-dependent structures and mechanisms. The paper will describe a framework for practice research that uses found footage and animated collage within a critical realist methodology. The research deploys strategies that privilege simultaneity, overlap and hybridity in articulating layered temporalities that foreground a dialectical conception of history. The practice explores how critical realist collage can challenge essentialist, unitary historical narratives that suppress the interdependence and complexity of socio-historical phenomena. Can the partial and irregular experience of remembering, evoking the contingent and furtive conditions of personal and collective memory be rendered through the aesthetic of moving collage? In reference to animated documentary, the work investigates how spatial and temporal found footage collage can expand the language of non-fiction films that address memory and the past. The paper will argue that the deeper understanding of memory and history that critical realism offers could be apprehended through the construction and mediation that the vocabularies of animation and collage contain.
    • Leading strategic change in arts: twist or bust?

      Mcgravie, David; University of Derby (27/01/2017)
      Reviewing leadership and management of strategic level operations and change, and will draw on a number of relevant and diverse organization level case studies of change looking at how HEI manage change.
    • Learning journal and portfolio tools

      Bryson, David; University of Derby (2012-12)
    • Left behind.

      O'Connor, Aisling; Clarke, Siobhan; McMahon, Daithi; University of Derby (Shannonside Northern Sound Radio, 2014-04)
      This production was heavily inspired by the Ann Lovett's story from 1984. Ann was a 15-year-old schoolgirl found dead at a Grotto in Granard, Co Longford in late January with her new born baby by her side. Both died of exposure. This drama suggests what might have happened had a heavily pregnant Ann fled Granard. The play explores the journey her daughter may have taken to uncover her mother's past in a community unwilling to discuss it. The writers were careful not to be overt in their references to the Ann Lovett story as it remains a sensitive subject in the area to this day. This drama is unique because it strives to give young Irish women with unexpected pregnancies a voice in a country where abortion remains illegal. The drama skillfully integrates flashbacks to the 1980s to imagine the struggle and pain Cyndi's mother must have experienced. The radio play was written by Aisling O'Connor (producer) and Siobhan Clarke (director). The production was produced and edited by This production was heavily inspired by the Ann Lovett's story from 1984. Ann was a 15-year-old schoolgirl found dead at a Grotto in Granard, Co Longford in late January with her new born baby by her side. Both died of exposure. This drama suggests what might have happened had a heavily pregnant Ann fled Granard. The play explores the journey her daughter may have taken to uncover her mother's past in a community unwilling to discuss it. The writers were careful not to be overt in their references to the Ann Lovett story as it remains a sensitive subject in the area to this day. This drama is unique because it strives to give young Irish women with unexpected pregnancies a voice in a country where abortion remains illegal. The drama skillfully integrates flashbacks to the 1980s to imagine the struggle and pain Cyndi's mother must have experienced. The radio play was written by Aisling O'Connor (producer) and Siobhan Clarke (director). The production was produced and edited by Daithí McMahon.
    • The legacy of Mad Men: cultural history, intermediality and American television

      McNally, K; Marcellus, J; Forde, Teresa; Fairclough, K; London Metropolitan University; Middle Tennessee State University; University of Derby; University of Salford (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019-12-12)
      For seven seasons, viewers worldwide watched as ad man Don Draper moved from adultery to self-discovery, secretary Peggy Olson became a take-no-prisoners businesswoman, object-of-the-gaze Joan Holloway developed a feminist consciousness, executive Roger Sterling tripped on LSD, and smarmy Pete Campbell became a surprisingly nice guy. Mad Men defined a pivotal moment for television, earning an enduring place in the medium’s history. This edited collection examines the enduringly popular television series as Mad Men still captivates audiences and scholars in its nuanced depiction of a complex decade. This is the first book to offer an analysis of Mad Men in its entirety, exploring the cyclical and episodic structure of the long form series and investigating issues of representation, power and social change. The collection establishes the show’s legacy in televisual terms, and brings it up to date through an examination of its cultural importance in the Trump era. Aimed at scholars and interested general readers, the book illustrates the ways in which Mad Men has become a cultural marker for reflecting upon contemporary television and politics.
    • Life Goes On

      Bosward, Marc; University of Derby (17/06/2016)
      Digital collage artworks included in group show: Juxtaposition an exhibition of contemporary collage and video art at The Museum of Club Culture, 17th June - July 10th. Curated by Mark Wigan and Kerry Baldry.
    • Life with and without animals: the second (Un)common worlds conference

      Bartram, Angela; Baker, Steve; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2020-11)
      Keynote speakers: Dr. Susan McHugh, Professor of English, University of New England and Snæbjörnsdóttir/Wilson - Dr Bryndís Snæbjörnsdóttir, Professor of Fine Art, Iceland University of the Arts, Reykjavík, and, Dr Mark Wilson, Professor of Fine Art, Institute of the the Arts, University of Cumbria, UK. Following the first (Un)common Worlds conference in Turku, Finland in 2018, called Contesting the Limits of Human – Animal Communities, the animal research group within the Digital and Material Artistic Research Centre at the University of Derby presented the second, Life With and Without Animals, a one-day online animal studies conference in November 2020. When the term ‘animal studies’ was coined in the early 1990s it was initially envisaged rather narrowly as a subfield of the social sciences, but by the time of two large and ground-breaking international conferences in 2000 – Representing Animals in Milwaukee and Millennial Animals in Sheffield – it was clear that the arts and humanities were at least as important to this nascent field as the social sciences. Some of the concerns of those early conferences remain as important as ever: the avoidance of anthropocentrism, an attention to the lives and experience of nonhuman animals that does not reduce them to symbolic representations of human values, and a recognition of the contested but necessary role of animal advocacy within the field of animal studies. Other priorities have shifted, perhaps most importantly in recognition of the impact of climate change, environmental degradation and species extinctions, and the changes these have brought about to our understanding of, and engagement with the more-than-human world. This conference conveyed a sense of what the interdisciplinary field of animal studies looked like in 2020, and included contributions in support of this proposal. Originally planned as a three-day physical conference for July 2020, this was rescheduled and re-orientated for online delivery over a day in November 2020 due to the Covid-19 pandemic. A recording of the day is attached to this record. Conference leads: Professor Steve Baker and Professor Angela Bartram.
    • Limited edition screenprint

      Levesley, Richard; University of Derby (2015-02)
      My work explores themes of humour, word play, narrative and visual storytelling. Focus is on the use of Illustration to explore personal voice and the extent that this can be applied to processes whilst retaining visual identity. I am interested in the process of Illustration and experimentation in various outputs, this is currently leading me into further visual treatment such as 3d laser cut artworks and ceramics.
    • Linking languages: Realigning design vocabularies [Editorial]

      Oddey, Alison; Benedetto, Stephen Di; White, Christine; University of Derby (Intellect, 2013-12-01)
      A crowded gallery, a theatre in the round or the backroom of a local pub can become more than a destination. These spaces are transformed when a group of people come together to share an experience, whether it is to view a display of Enlightenment curiosities, a representation of the pit of history or the history of the Canadian nation. Each space contains an event, which is designed, planned for, shaped and presented, to impart some mediated experience. Much of the vocabulary we use to describe the elements and principles for shaping the scene are a result of inherited assumptions made popular in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. The challenges that have evolved with technologies have exerted tensions and pressures on some of the vocabularies we use, in order to describe the organization of scenes. Our relationship to the world is framed by our exposure to ubiquitous experiences and technological interactions. Our vocabularies and languages to describe technologies and discoveries maintain a static language even when a visual organization influenced by an ‘Ap’ icon is drastically different from those of the early industrial age. While our aspirations for creating artwork that challenges the world as it is, remains constant, our conception of what constitutes effective expression has changed.
    • Lo zoo delle donne giraffe: un viaggio tra i Kayan nella Tailandia del nord

      Nicoletti, Martino; University of Derby, School of Art and Design (Edizioni Exòrma - Roma, 2011)
      In the form of an extended travelogue combined with information relating to the recent history of the Kayan as well as to their mythology and religion, the work – based on experience during field-work in the north-west of Thailand in 2009 and 2010 – is an original contribution to knowledge in the field of the history of ethnic tourism among the Kayan. A sizable set of BW photographs – taken by the author using a 1920s Kodak box camera and a 1960s Agfa medium format camera – enriches the work, providing a rare contribution to the most experimental contemporary visual anthropology and lens-based arts. Text and images are, moreover, accompanied by a DVD containing an experimental Super-8 short by the author: "I Must Not Look You in the Eyes", a dynamic counterpart to the written and visual accounts, as well as to their specific mood.
    • The long commute

      McNaney, Nicki; University of Derby (2015-11)
      The Long Commute , is a screen-printed illustration submitted for the,‘Tales of the City' Cheltenham Illustration Awards, University of Gloucestershire. This work was inspired by the journey taken each morning from the country to the city and the differing experiences encountered along the way.
    • Longing for the light: darkness, dislocation and spaces of exile

      Hall, Mark; University of Derby (Universitätsverlag Winter (Mar 2012), 2012-09)
      There have been many studies of light and this paper acknowledges all of the scholarship that goes before, however, this is not a study of light but a study of how light defines perceived identity and how our relationship to it in turn defines our own sense of self. I shall be examining work from different areas of the arts, literature, photography and film to develop my argument, showing how writers and artists have located both the subject and the reader/viewer to exploit this dynamic. Light, as Foucault reminds us, became the most visible symbol of those that, during the Enlightenment, sought to banish darkened spaces and create a visible society. This led eventually to Bentham’s design for the Panopticon which became a model of “‘power through transparency’, [and] subjection through ‘illumination’” which, as Foucault points out, could serve as a template for other areas of society where visibility was a necessary adjunct to other forms of more physical control (the police or the army). Light itself, defines space, sets its visible limits, reveals, creates and, as I shall show, establishes identities. Where one positions oneself, in relation to the light, depends on a number of factors and determines the limits of inclusion into what we may term civilized society. This paper sets out to look at instances where both spatial and individual identity is established through the position in which the subject is placed in relation to the light and its source.
    • Lord of the Rings – the Musical as a world musical product or just a British export?

      White, Christine; University of Derby (Intellect, 2015-10-01)
      The stage musical adaptation of J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings, began in Toronto, Canada in 2006 and then transferred to London ending its run there in 2008. It is due to embark on a new world tour in 2015. Matthew Warchus, British theatre director created an extravagant, three-act stage production which received its premiere at Toronto’s Princess of Wales Theatre in March 2007. The production designed by Rob Howell, premiered in London in May 2007 at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane and ended its run after 492 performances in July 2008. The musical was the first stage adaptation of the literary epic and followed the hugely successful film trilogy. A new tour, is being designed to accommodate theatres around the globe, and will launch in New Zealand in 2015 and although the countries of the tour have not been announced, there is much interest amongst Tolkien fans for its come back. The new touring version is billed as retaining the unique, thrilling and spectacular theatrical magic of the original production. The music is by Academy Award winner A.R. Rahman (Slumdog Millionaire), Värttinä and Christopher Nightingale. The lyrics and libretto are by Shaun McKenna and Matthew Warchus. The Lord of the Rings – the Musical has lighting by Paul Pyant, special effects by Greg Meeh, sound by Simon Baker and magic illusions by Paul Kieve. This article reviews the work as commercial product, revival or just colonial export of British or Canadian scenic motifs and stagings. The production began in Canada and reviews wavered between praise and defamation, between a spectacular production of sets and a celebrated new musical score. The link beneath is for the reader to get a sense of the production style and values, if you haven’t seen the musical, yet.
    • Luddite Drawings: a series of drawings (3) that explore process, performance and gesture, selected for the group exhibition ‘From Here & There: drawings from Colorado and Wales.

      Shore, Tim; University of Derby (2014-09)
      Luddite Drawings is a series of three A1 drawings made with pencil and carbon paper and using guides made in Adobe Indesign. Each drawing consist of two sets of closely aligned lines that cross each other at right angles. Luddite Drawings explores ideas around drawing, work, craft, repetition, copying and the presence and performance of the body in the drawing process. In making the drawings I set myself rules that I could not meet. I devised a game that pitched the production of the drawing against factors like tiredness, concentration, measurement and correctness. My methodology was guided by Marina Warner’s writing about play and the haptic qualities of making and experiential learning, David Pye’s theory of ‘the workmanship of risk and the workmanship of certainty’ and Tim Inglold’s notions of Wayfaring and Transport. The completed drawings were digitised and printed as A2 Giclée prints for the exhibition From Here and There: Drawings from Colorado and Wales. The exhibition was part of an international exchange of contemporary drawings between artists in Colorado and Wales. Exhibition catalogue available.
    • Lusitania: Beneath the surface.

      McMahon, Daithi; O'Connor, Fred; University of Derby (Radio Kerry, 2014-12)
      After the RMS Lusitania is sunk by a German U-boat off the south-west coast of Ireland in 1915 the people of the Blasket Islands in Co Kerry rallied to save as many souls as possible and nurse them back to health. This is the story of how one of those survivors unsettles the peaceful islands as his dark past is quickly catching up with him after an investigation is launched into the sinking.
    • Making a rock

      Locke, Caroline; Swann, Debra; University of Derby; The Academy in Antwerp; Nottingham Trent University (N/A, 16/03/2016)
      This collaborative project with Caroline Locke and Debra Swann was developed through a series of residencies at Primary, Nottingham and Summer Lodge at Nottingham Trent University 2016. The first exhibition at The Collectiv National Gallery, Antwerp, Belgium in 2016 and then developed further as part of an exhibition at Primary, Nottingham 2017. Making a Rock is an ongoing durational performance that attends to the physical construction of a large-scale object (a cardboard ‘rock’) embracing the potential of duration, temporality, liveness and performativity. Using photography, video and sound to document this process of making, the enquiry expands the vocabulary of sculptural practice through the focus of the durational aspects of making and the idea of the sculptural work in flux. This enquiry explores the process of making and collecting data. It investigates how we understand objects and sound and the properties and qualities they possess. Through the artist/object relationship a focus on the evolution of an object and the artist’s process is examined. Rock Music is a composition created using sounds taken from recordings of the artist Debra Swann making a huge cardboard rock. The artists have explored the different kinds of data gathered from their combined artistic practices. They extract the data and rework it in live performances and exhibited works. Rock Music explores sound in relation to domestic and labour intensive activity. The composition is cut onto a vinyl record which is played over and over within the exhibition space. The sound of the activity becomes abstract and otherworldly when amplified. Mundane working involves repetition – a strange rhythm develops – a kind of chant.
    • Making shaking shifting pouring sawing

      Locke, Caroline; Swann, Debra; University of Derby; Nottingham Trent University; Collectiv National Gallery, Antwerp; The Royal Academy of Fine Arts Antwerp (Primary Studios Nottingham, 2017-02)
      Making Shaking Shifting Pouring Sawing is an installation, exhibition and live Performance. The work explores the idea of repeated and intensive labour and the data gathered in relation to artistic and domestic processes. The exhibits and performances feature made and found objects and the data collected in relation to repeated activities whilst making or working with the objects. The data is retrieved as sound, physical data, digital imagery and animation. These elements are exposed as part of live performances and exhibited kinetic sculptures and devices. The project involved collaborative research explored by Caroline Locke and Debra Swann and was initially developed through a series of residencies at Primary, Nottingham and Summer lodge at Nottingham Trent University 2016. The first exhibition was in Antwerp, Belgium, at Collectiv National, Antwerp Gallery in 2016 (Collectiv National, was founded by Janna Beck and is linked to The Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, Belgium). An exhibition and live performance at Primary, Nottingham followed in 2017. As an extension of Locke’s residency at Nottingham University, based across the Mixed Reality Lab and Horizon Digital Economy Institute, Locke and Swann worked with Assistant Professor Max Wilson and Horia Maior, who equipped Debra with a brain scanning device known as Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) in order to record mental workload levels during her creative making processes. Visualisations of the recorded brain data were projected as part of a live performance and exhibition. The brain data was also used to control various devices as part of the exhibition. For example: a motor uses the rate of brain activity to speed up and slow down a record deck. Rock Music is a composition created using sounds taken from recordings of the artist Debra Swann making a huge cardboard rock. The ‘music’ was cut onto a vinyl disc and played on the brain data controlled device. Rock Music explores sound in relation to domestic and labour intensive activity – The brain effort during the making activity controls the speed at which the record plays during the performances and exhibitions. Shaking Shelves is a kinetic sculpture which is also part of the live performance and exhibition. The brain effort during a cleaning and sweeping process controls the speed at which the motor attached to a shelving unit spins. The shelves are loaded with domestic items and the vibration and movement of the motor causes the shelves to vibrate and the items to shake and sometimes fall. The extended Performing Data research is funded by the Arts Council and explores ideas around body rhythms and physical data in connection with labour, multi-tasking and women's work. Locke is interested in capturing data and using it to control kinetic sculptures within an immersive environment.