• Hand on heart

      McNaney, Nicki; University of Derby (29/09/2017)
      An Illustration created for Rankin Photography Studio, to promote British Heart Foundation, “World Heart Day” An international art project with creatives from around the world, to raise awareness of the global fight against heart disease through the use of social media.
    • The hands of Beuys and Heidegger

      Baker, Steve; University of Derby (Whitechapel Gallery/ MIT Press, 2016)
    • The Hastings sound fountain

      Locke, Caroline; University of Derby; Nottingham Trent Unviersity (FACT, Liverpool, 2015-07)
      The term ‘ Performing Data’ was first used by the artist Dr Rachel Jacobs and became the title of Caroline Locke’s research residency at Nottingham University. The Performing Data Project was developed by an interdisciplinary group of HCI (Human, Computer, Interaction) researchers, artists and creative technicians based across the Mixed Reality Lab and Horizon Digital Economy Institute. The Hastings Sound Fountain was developed as part of this project and residency. Locke makes works that ‘Perform data’, revealing data to an audience in various embodied forms - sometimes slowly, sometimes live, to elicit emotions, engage the imagination, extend understanding and to inspire an audience to reflect. Caroline makes links to our natural world and finds ways to expose the beauty in nature. She is keen to find innovative ways of communicating scientific and environmental research to a public audience. The Hastings Sound Fountain at FACT was controlled by data being sent LIVE from Hastings Pier. A sensor on the end of the pier is recording the rise and fall of the sea level and the levels trigger the rise and fall in the sound frequencies being sent to the Fountain. As the sensor tracks the rise and fall of the sea, frequencies sweep through the Sound Fountain, causing ripples and waves on the water surface. A visualisation of the live data and footage of the sea beneath the sensor is projected or viewed on a monitor close to the fountain. Locke contributed to a series of workshops, talks, and events, which were scheduled to facilitate visitor understanding at FACT in Liverpool in July 2015. The Hastings Sound Fountain was exhibited as part of these events.
    • Head space and Dark days.

      McNaney, Nicki; University of Derby (Broken Grey Wires, 26/02/2018)
      Broken Grey Wires is an ongoing investigation into art and mental health by developing a dialogue with leading contemporary artists. Two screen-printed illustrations,Head Space and Dark Days are included in an artist book Psycho published by Broken Grey Wires.
    • Hearing Without Ears

      McKenzie, Ian; Lennox, Peter; Wiggins, Bruce; University of Derby (Georgia Institute of Technology, 22/06/2014)
      We report on on-going work investigating the feasibility of using tissue conduction to evince auditory spatial perception. Early results indicate that it is possible to coherently control externalization, range, directionality (including elevation), movement and some sense of spaciousness without presenting acoustic signals to the outer ear. Signal control techniques so far have utilised discrete signal feeds, stereo and 1st order ambisonic hierarchies. Some deficiencies in frontal externalization have been observed. We conclude that, whilst the putative components of the head related transfer function are absent, empirical tests indicate that coherent equivalents are perceptually utilisable. Some implications for perceptual theory and technological implementations are discussed along with potential practical applications and future lines of enquiry.
    • Heart sensing sound fountain

      Locke, Caroline; The University of Derby; Nottingham Trent University (FACT, Liverpool, 2015-07)
      The term ‘ Performing Data’ was first used by the artist Dr Rachel Jacobs and became the title of Caroline Locke’s research residency at Nottingham University. The Performing Data Project was developed by an interdisciplinary group of HCI (Human, Computer, Interaction) researchers, artists and creative technicians based across the Mixed Reality Lab and Horizon Digital Economy Institute. The Heart Sensing Sound Fountain was developed as part of this project and residency. The previous work Sound Fountains, where sound is visualized through water has been developed so that audiences can engage in their own unique and sometimes very personal experience with the Sound Fountain, using their body data to make changes within an installation environment. The audience (or 2 participants) are asked to place their fingertip on top of the heart shaped sensor, to hold in place for as long as they like to see what happens to the Sound Fountains. The sensor locates the participant’s heart rate and their pulse triggers tones, which are sent to the Sound Fountains. They watch as the waves synchronize with their own beating heart. The sculpture involves live performance on many levels. An element of performance is at the end of the data flow in the water but also between the two individuals facing each other and the dialogue that occurs between them. The surrounding audience watch as the two participants become performers. Perhaps there is a feedback loop as participants attempt to slow down their heart rate or it speeds up with levels of engagement/excitement. The activity is part of a long period of original and significant research and development. Locke’s research, in its wider sense, reflects on the relationship between the spectator and the performer and the opportunities to blur their respective roles within Contemporary Art Practice. It investigates ways in which a spectator can engage more in the work through direct interaction. For example, spectators became performers and integral to the work by triggering sensors within the exhibition space, allowing their presence to orchestrate changes within the installation.
    • Here and there: two works, ten countries

      Bartram, Angela; O'Neill, Mary; University of Lincoln (2015-09)
      A paper was delivered remotely at The Body: Out of Time and Without a Place conference at Contemporary Art Centre, Vilnius, via two performing 'bodies'. The 'script' for these bodies was exhibited in the Performance Ephemera exhibition as a paper document at Practice Gallery, University of Worcester. The paper abstract for Vilnius: The presence of the performing body is central to the experience of live art. It is this distinctive quality that enables an audience to engage with an unmediated work that incorporates contingencies of site and response. In this paper we will discuss two works by Bartram O’Neill (the authors’ collaborative name) that address the myth of presence through an interrogation of ‘liveness’ and what it constitutes in art practice when reliant on technological means. In 2013 Bartram O’Neill performed "I, I am, I am here, I am speaking here" as part of Performa 1, Art Basel Miami (USA). This was performed remotely, from the U.K. through two ‘bodies’ in Miami. Unlike the theatrical tradition of script, rehearsal, interpretation etc. this work required these ‘bodies’ to act as channels and ‘puppets’ for the performers in the UK. Using text messaging and Skype, the UK based ‘performers’ and authors of the work communicated to the audience in Miami through their Miami based translators. Meanwhile the UK authors listened to the performance through a telephone connection with an audience member, and thereby being both performers and audience of their work. Bartram O’Neill participated in “O/R” in the streamed Low Lives 4 Networked Performance Festival. From an empty gallery in Nottingham, UK, the pair performed at 2am GMT to an open laptop on the floor, reaching audiences in the USA, Japan, Trinidad & Tobago, Australia, France, Colombia, Norway, and Aruba, between 8- 9pm the calendar day before, depending on location. These works incorporated not just distance, but also time difference - in the former the performers were in a living room surrounded by their diurnal domestic trappings and in the latter they performed in the middle of the night having walked through deserted streets to occupy a gallery devoid of life. 'Both works distanced the body of the performer, who was in fact ‘present’. This explores the possibilities, complexities and contingencies of this dynamic seeking to analyse what it is to be presented as ‘live’ when geographically distant.
    • Here and there: two works, ten countries (displaced)

      Bartram, Angela; O'Neill, Mary; University of Lincoln (2015-09)
      Bartram O’Neill performed "I, I am, I am here, I am speaking here" as part of Performa 1, Art Basel Miami and "Here and There: Two Works, Ten Countries" for The Body: Out of Time and Without a Place (Vilnius).This was performed remotely, from the U.K. through two ‘bodies’ in Miami acting as channels and ‘puppets’ for the performers in the UK. The work distances the performers bodies, despite their being ‘present’ as audience through Skype and mobile phone. It explores the possibilities, complexities and contingencies of this dynamic seeking to analyse what it is to be presented as ‘live’ when geographically distant. The paper displaced the authors: one was in her living room whilst the other was at the conference, yet only one spoke. The text in Irish was delivered from the 'script' by the author in her home, whilst the other gave her role to a conference delegate at the start of the session. A role he had no idea he would take prior to walking in the room and meeting her invite. The author present at the conference documented the event from the back. Both authors answered questions afterwards.
    • Here and There: two works, ten countries.

      Bartram, Angela; O'Neill, Mary; University of Lincoln (22/05/2015)
      The presence of the performing body is central to the experience of live art. It is this distinctive quality that enables an audience to engage with an unmediated work that incorporates contingencies of site and response. In this paper we will discuss two works by Bartram O’Neill (the authors’ collaborative name) that address the myth of presence through an interrogation of ‘liveness’ and what it constitutes in art practice when reliant on technological means. In 2013 Bartram O’Neill performed "I, I am, I am here, I am speaking here" as part of Performa 1, Art Basel Miami (USA). This was performed remotely, from the U.K. through two ‘bodies’ in Miami. Unlike the theatrical tradition of script, rehearsal, interpretation etc. this work required these ‘bodies’ to act as channels and ‘puppets’ for the performers in the UK. Using text messaging and Skype, the UK based ‘performers’ and authors of the work communicated to the audience in Miami through their Miami based translators. Meanwhile the UK authors listened to the performance through a telephone connection with an audience member, and thereby being both performers and audience of their work. Bartram O’Neill participated in “O/R” in the streamed Low Lives 4 Networked Performance Festival. From an empty gallery in Nottingham, UK, the pair performed at 2am GMT to an open laptop on the floor, reaching audiences in the USA, Japan, Trinidad & Tobago, Australia, France, Colombia, Norway, and Aruba, between 8- 9pm the calendar day before, depending on location. These works incorporated not just distance, but also time difference - in the former the performers were in a living room surrounded by their diurnal domestic trappings and in the latter they performed in the middle of the night having walked through deserted streets to occupy a gallery devoid of life. Both works distanced the body of the performer, who was in fact ‘present’. This paper explores the possibilities, complexities and contingencies of this dynamic seeking to analyse what it is to be presented as ‘live’ when geographically distant.
    • Here and there: two works, ten countries.

      Bartram, Angela; O'Neill, Mary; University of Lincoln (Vilnius Academy of Arts, 2016)
      The presence of the performing body is central to the experience of live art. It is this distinctive quality that enables an audience to engage with an unmediated work that incorporates contingencies of site and response. Here we will discuss two works by Bartram O’Neill (the authors’ collaborative name) that address the myth of presence through an interrogation of ‘liveness’ and what it constitutes in art practice when reliant on technological means. This specifically relates to the performance using remote and scripted bodies at The Body: Out of Time and Without a Place conference in Vilnius 2016. In 2013 Bartram O’Neill performed "I, I am, I am here, I am speaking here" as part of Performa 1, Art Basel Miami (USA). This was performed remotely, from the U.K. through two ‘bodies’ in Miami. Unlike the theatrical tradition of script, rehearsal, interpretation etc. this work required these ‘bodies’ to act as channels and ‘puppets’ for the performers in the UK. Using text messaging and Skype, the UK based ‘performers’ and authors of the work communicated to the audience in Miami through their Miami based translators. Meanwhile the UK authors listened to the performance through a telephone connection with an audience member, and thereby being both performers and audience of their work. Bartram O’Neill participated in “O/R” in the streamed Low Lives 4 Networked Performance Festival. From an empty gallery in Nottingham, UK, the pair performed at 2am GMT to an open laptop on the floor, reaching audiences in the USA, Japan, Trinidad & Tobago, Australia, France, Colombia, Norway, and Aruba, between 8- 9pm the calendar day before, depending on location. These works incorporated not just distance, but also time difference - in the former the performers were in a living room surrounded by their diurnal domestic trappings and in the latter they performed in the middle of the night having walked through deserted streets to occupy a gallery devoid of life. 'Both works distanced the body of the performer, who was in fact ‘present’. This text offers the script for the performance, which opened up and explored the possibilities, complexities and contingencies of the dynamic of present and absent bodies and artistic agencies, thus seeking to analyse what it is to be presented as ‘live’ when geographically distant.
    • Higher Education Academy Fellowship

      Lennox, Peter; University of Derby (2014)
      Having a lifelong interest in knowledge and learning, I view the claims and practices of education and higher education practices with active and interested skepticism, which comes out of a profound optimism – that what we have now is not the best we could have. Higher education should always be in the best interests of the individual being educated, tempered by the interests of society at large; above all, education should do no harm. It seems to me that this “bottom up” approach, whereby improving the thinking abilities of individuals improves the behavior of whole societies is the primary reason for the expensive activity of education. Economic research indicates correlations between education and state prosperity (Berger and Fisher 2013) though benefits of increased productivity may not necessarily be equally distributed. Furthermore, the causal mechanisms at play are not finely elucidated.
    • A history

      Shore, Tim; Jennings, Humphrey; University of Derby (2015)
      'A history' is an artists’ book (edition of 10) made from Corrugated card, tissue paper, newsprint, letterpress, binding screw and string. The book presents repetitions of the phrase “1. the factory, 2. the school, 3. the workhouse, 4. the prison” taken from a note by Humphrey Jennings in his anthology ‘Pandaemonium: The Coming of the Machine As Seen by Contemporary Observers (1660-1886)’. Jennings comments on ‘The History of Derby’ (1817) in which W. Hutton recounts his experiences as a child apprentice at the Derby Silk Mill c.1730: “The abstract horror of the image derives in part from the unspoken acknowledgement of the truth as far as 18th century poor were concerned: 1. the factory, 2. the school, 3. the workhouse, 4. the prison, were all the same building.”
    • A holistic approach to the decolonisation of modules in sustainable interior design

      Di Monte-Milner, Giovanna; University of Johannesburg (Design Education Forum of Southern Africa, 2017-09)
      This paper stems from the need to develop and deliver a new module in sustainable interior design (BASD6B2) at a 2nd year level within a new Degree programme at the University of Johannesburg, in 2017. This module’s development however relies on a reflection on another sustainable interior design module (BASD6B1) in the curriculum, offered at a 1st year level. The paper also secondly arises from the national call for the transformation and decolonisation of education programmes in South African tertiary institutions. This new BASD6B2 module thus needs to demonstrate a deeper connection with African roots, rather than make use of over-emphasised Eurocentric ideals. Like the global Ubuntu education approach, decolonisation requires an advancement of indigenous knowledge, expertise, teaching and learning. Thirdly, there is also a need for interior design education, worldwide, to align itself with changing notions of sustainability, which requires educators to embrace a new, emerging ecological paradigm. In this paradigm, regenerative thinking seeks to push sustainable design from merely sustaining the health of a system, towards more holistic, systems thinking, reconnecting us to place and the rituals of place (Reed 2007, p. 677). A reflection on both the sustainable interior design modules’ designs reveals several gaps. Firstly, there is no specific requirement that the emerging ecological paradigm, and the notion of regenerative thinking, be taught within the module. Secondly, one of the module outcomes requires that students be taught about sustainability through the use of a rating tool, the Green Star SA (GSSA) Interiors Rating Tool, which, while valuable, is too mechanistic and does not support holistic thinking. Thirdly, another gap is that the Green Building Council of South Africa’s (GBCSA) Green Star SA – Interiors v1 Technical Manual includes little to no reference of African studies, methods and skills in the technical manual. This issue is revealed in my ongoing PhD study, which uses a constructivist grounded theory approach. Fourthly, the tool is based on an Australian tool which is, in turn, based on an American tool, and it thus deploys western constructs. The aim of this paper is thus to develop a teaching strategy that can complement the design of both modules, with a focus however on the new module BASD6B2, in order to teach students about sustainability more holistically, while celebrating and advancing African building methods and skills. The main findings reveal that the sustainable interior design modules (based on the given outcomes) do not support a holistic and decolonised approach to teaching and learning. A holistic teaching strategy is thus necessary to promote an African identity. The paper concludes that this pro-active teaching strategy can augment the sustainable interior design modules. Firstly both modules can include a holistic introductory lesson. A second tactic in the strategy could be to include diverse curriculum content and regenerative design concepts into the BASD6B2 module. This strategy generally aims to advance students’ mindsets about sustainable design, while encouraging them to be co-creators of local knowledge, while designing sustainably, for an African identity.
    • Homefront

      Fisher, Craig; University for Creative Arts; Nottingham Trent University (2014-04)
      ‘Homefront’ was commissioned by David Hastie (Director) and Gordon Dalton, project manager at LOCWS International in partnership with (Andrew Deathe) the National Waterfront Museum, Swansea. Fisher’s large-scale public artwork was realized after exploring material related specifically to the era of World War 1 such as propaganda posters, Dazzle/ pattern as camouflage, the lost generation, women in Wales through textiles/domestic interior and the War in Wales through the available archives across different museums across Wales (National Waterfront Museum, National Wool Museum and St Fagans National History Museum) to explore different facets of violence and war. Fisher develops a critical enquiry around notions of war, it's aftermath, disaster and gender stereotypes in relation to a continued exploration of the seductive power of media representations of violence and destruction. The work employs the architectural façade as a device to explore mediated narrative constructions and theatricality, the pictorial experience of sculpture is particularly important to this current inquiry and to the ways the work disrupts conventions. Pattern and craft techniques are investigated to complicate and subvert the artefact, challenging received ideas of masculinity and muddling ‘male’ and ‘female’ signifiers. LOCWS International specifically invited Fisher due to the nature of his continued exploration of the subversive potential of textile craft techniques in the fabrication of the installations/artifacts he makes. ‘Homefront’ was sited and exhibited at the National Waterfront Museum in April 2014, coinciding with LOCWS International's Art Across The City, 2014, which was their largest event to date (visited by 44,000 people,) with over 25 public artworks exhibited across Swansea.
    • Homemaker

      McNaney, Nicki; University of Derby (Surface Gallery, 2016-01)
      The postcard was exhibited at the The International Postcard Show,Surface Gallery, Nottingham.The postcard exhibition featured hundreds of original artworks in a wide range of media by established artists, from all over the world. The postcard was created using traditional drawing and screen-printed media based around an old mid -century cupboard and its contents.
    • Homestead

      McNaney, Nicki; University of Derby (Highlights, 2016)
      The artist book was exhibited at the Contemporary Artists’ PAGES, Book Fair, The Tetley, Leeds & in a touring exhibition of paper-cut and artist’s books in Cumbria and Northumbria. The book was published in conjunction with an artist book project created for the third year illustration student cohort and was used as an example for learning and teaching.
    • Horizons

      Hall, Mark; University of Derby (SACI Florence, 2016-06-04)
    • How do we speak about art about animals?

      Baker, Steve; University of Derby (2014)
      ‘How do we speak about art about animals?’, my closing plenary address at the Warsaw conference Animals and their People: The Fall of the Anthropocentric Paradigm?, was the first international paper in which I included discussion of work in my Scapeland series. In part, the abstract read as follows: ‘“De l’animal peut-on parler?,” Jacques Derrida famously asked in relation to philosophy’s tendency to overlook nonhuman animals, and to have little idea of how to speak about their relation to humans in meaningful terms. … Drawing on a range of contemporary examples, including a few of the pieces on show in the Ecce Animalia exhibition in Orońsko, this talk will consider the distinctive “voice” of the artist … The focus will be on artists who engage directly with questions of animal life,. … Conventional distinctions (human versus animal; ethics versus aesthetics) have no useful place here. Instead, to borrow Foucault’s words from a slightly different context, what these artists can sometimes offer are images, experiences and structures “within which we both recognize and lose ourselves’.” Immediately after this talk tje conference delegates were taken on an evening visit to the Ecce Animalia exhibition in the Museum of Contemporary Sculpture, which had been planned to coincide with the conference and which included an installation of early pieces from my Scapeland series. A welcome outcome after the conference was a request from the organizers to translate an essay of mine for the first Polish edited collection of writings on animal stidies. This appeared in 2015 as: ‘Sztuka wspolczesna i prawa zwierzat’, in Zwierzeta i ich ludzie. Zmierzch antropocentrycznego paradygmatu, eds A. Barcz and D. Lagodzka (Warszawa: Wydawnictwo Instytutu Badań Literackich PAN), 2015, pp. 65-87. ISBN 978-83-64703-27-0. (A Polish translation of my essay ‘Contemporary art and animal rights’.)
    • How to develop creative capacity for the fourth industrial revolution: Creativity and employability in higher education

      Wilson, Chris; Lennox, Peter; Brown, Michael; Hughes, Gareth; University of Derby (Knowledge, Innovation & Enterprise, 15/10/2017)
      With changing patterns of accountability in higher education, universities are becoming increasingly focused on performing well against a growing number of metrics. Many used as proxy measures to indicate value of educational experience, amongst the most common and perhaps most notable are those relating to graduate career destinations. Universities have never been more focused on ensuring that graduates are ‘employable’. In the midst of the fourth industrial revolution, numerous studies highlight the potential significance and value of creativity, problem-solving and critical thinking, for successful navigation of the complexities of the future. Consequently, these capacities are becoming more significant in determining graduate career development and educational strategy in higher education. This chapter presents a synthesis of related fields of research to construct an outline framework for the development of organizational creativity and creative graduates concluding that there are aspects of current pedagogical practice capable of worthwhile reform.
    • Human rights, participatory theatre and regional publics: Acting Alone and A Story to Tell

      Hunt, Ava; University of Derby (29/04/2017)
      This paper explores how artists are continuing to develop new participatory theatre models that address social and political issues within a human rights arena. Using my productions, Acting Alone and A Story to Tell, as its primary case studies, the paper will examine how efficacy can be created with different community audiences by experimenting with forms of participatory, autobiographical and verbatim theatre. Acting Alone is a monologue performance about Palastinian refugee camps from the perspective of a mother and artist, and A Story to Tell is a verbatim first-hand account of refugees in Greece. Informed by current refugee theatre, theory and practice, this paper asks how artists might use performance to engage audiences in revolutionary thinking in relation to immigration, refugees and human rights issues. Boal’s premise that theatre is a weapon for revolution will be drawn on; however, when audiences may not be directly positioned as oppressed or oppressor, what other concerns are raised? If refugee stories are presented without political advocacy, they run the risk of reenforcing images of refugees as victims and the spectator as voyeur or by-stander. How might we appropriate Boal's work to contemporary western theatre practice to promote engagement with complex international issues and awareness of our shared responsibility towards human rights - in spite of cultural and geographical distance from the issues presented? What action can be taken? Graffiti on the streets of Athens last summer declared: ‘Our grandparents were refugees. Our parents were migrants. We have become racists’ (unknown 2016). How can theatre be a revolutionary voice to address these global and national questions?