• D.I.Y: Hydrophonics.

      Locke, Caroline; University of Derby; University of Chichester (University of Chichester, 2015)
      D.I.Y Too is a new book about “do it yourself” performance, with contributions made by over 30 arts practitioners and collectives. It's a sequel of sorts - or rather; a continuation - to a recent text that platformed a growing community of voices in theatre, art, dance and performance making. Its aim is to articulate and contextualise an ethos and practice within contemporary art called "DIY" theatre and performance. This book is a text that provokes, prescribes, instructs, argues, plays, advises, promotes and describes. Its emphasis is on how theatre makers can encourage and evolve performance making by sharing their theories and practices, to help empower more artists to engage with this way of working. Critically (or theoretically) this book addresses a wide range of perspectives on "DIY" theatre and performance and identifies key axioms and dichotomies between ethos and style. Contributors: Accidental Collective: Pippa Bailey: Simon Bowes: Daniel Bye: Karen Christopher: Helen Cole: Dirty Market: Fictional Dogshelf: Emma Frankland and Keir Cooper: Gob Squad: Donald Hutera: Mamoru Iriguchi: Dan Koop: Lila Dance: Caroline Locke: LOW PROFILE: Rachel Mars: Harun Morrison: Hannah Nicklin: Joseph O'Farrell (JOF): Paper Cinema: Patternfight: Plastic Castles: Sh!t Theatre: Sleeping Trees: Sleepwalk Collective: Tassos Stevens: Shamira Turner, Little Bulb: Uninvited Guests: Hannah Jane Walker: Melanie Wilson: Greg Wohead: Caroline Wright and Helen Paris.
    • Dark Fringes: Complexity and Emergence in Realist Collage

      Bosward, Marc; University of Derby (2019-06-13)
      The paper will present practice research at the intersection of collage, animation, found footage film and documentary. The research investigates the capacity of the fragmented, layered language of collage to engage the stratified, laminated reality advanced by the philosophy of critical realism. In contrast to empiricism and idealism, critical realism recognises the socially embedded, material and historically situated basis of knowledge production. In response, the research pursues a multivocal and pluralist approach to representation that the paper claims is necessary in apprehending the dense complexity of social relations. The project examines the status of archive footage as evidence of the multiple mechanisms and structures that have generated historical events. This draws from the critical realist concept of emergence in interrogating how the meaning of archive materials is mediated thorough the convergence of layers in collage aesthetics. This suggests that the spaces at the fringes of collage fragments can address the tension and exchange between facts and values in the negotiation of reality. The paper argues for the recognition of the interstitial space between and around evidence and facts, advancing an approach to realism open to the role of imagination and narrative in how we understand the world. In reference to the politics of layered realities, collage is suggested as a tool for challenging reductive accounts of the social world that obscure the power relations that determine events. Specifically, through aligning a critical realist engagement with intersectionality with postcolonial and Marxist perspectives, the work aims to contribute to the decolonisation of the mainstream media’s representation of the working classes and social history.
    • Data floes: Polar science as catalyst for the arts

      Locke, Caroline; University of Derby (British Antarctic Survey, 2016-10-20)
      In the Autumn of 2016 Locke was invited to participate in a half day workshop where artists and scientists talked together about how they use climate and environmental data sets to explore issues around the communication of science. The workshop took place as part of The Cambridge Festival of Ideas and was an opportunity to meet and share information with researchers from different disciplines whose work involves creating awareness and understanding of nature and science. Connections were made with climate scientists. Consultation began here with Dr Gareth Rees (Cambridge University) and his research into remote sensing techniques and the monitoring of the dynamics of Arctic glaciated and vegetated terrain. This later became an important connection. Locke worked in consultation with Gareth, who facilitated her links with The Norwegian Polar Institute and The Arctic University of Norway in 2020. Data floes: polar science as catalyst for the arts ended with an evening public event as part of The Festival of Ideas.
    • Dead, dead, dead, dead, dead.

      Baker, Steve; University of Derby (Routledge, 2014-04-24)
    • Deep Space

      Crossley, John; University of Derby (Sound on Sound Ltd., 2015)
      For this ambitious project, John Crossley had a full live band play through a 16-speaker system, to create an immersive performance inspired by the Rosetta spacecraft’s journey through the solar system.
    • Defining contributions: inspiration driving original research.

      Abbas, Jabbar; Blood, Kate; Coulbert, Esme; Dallabona, Alice; Gamble, Rebecca; Roddis, Melissa; Silcock, Neil; Wijetunge, Nishan; Nottingham Trent University (Nottingham Trent University, 2012)
      Defining Contributions: Inspiration Driving Original Research was a postgraduate conference held at Nottingham Trent University on 18th May 2012. This conference was part of the Research Practice Course (RPC) in which students engage with research methods, theories and philosophies alongside their individual PhD research. This conference was organised by the third year students, papers were given by the second year students, and posters were presented by the first year students. This conference also included a paper from guest speaker Julius Ayodeji and was open for attendees from across the University. Publishing articles and presenting conference papers is an important component of any PhD programme. In view of this, the aim of this conference was to provide students with the opportunity to present a piece of useful material linked to their research in front of an audience within the friendly framework of the University, before embarking on the wider world of national and international conferences and publishing. This conference encouraged new multi-disciplinary papers about the originality, motivations, inspirations and contributions of students research.
    • Defining the female artist: Marion Adnams and surrealism

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (07/03/2018)
      Marion Adnams’ work can be placed into different periods and subject matter and curating her work involves making decisions about such criteria. But to what extent are wider grouping useful in defining an artist’s work and does placing Marion Adnams in the context of Surrealism offer any insights into her practice? The relationship of women artists to Surrealism and the female/male dichotomies within the movement will be considered in relation to the ways in which they resonate with motifs and themes within Marion Adnams’ own work. French Surrealism was largely envisaged as a collective movement, encapsulated in its British counterpart in the work of artists such as Nash and Agar, in painting, found objects and poetry, which may provide an understanding of Marion’s individual yet surrealist approach to her work.
    • Deformed Electronic Dance Music

      Vandemast-Bell, Paul; University of Derby (2016)
      This performance investigates the ways in which improvisation and digital repetition can be brought together to produce what I have termed ‘Deformed EDM (Electronic Dance Music)’. Digital repetition is generally employed in EDM performance to create fluid transitions between predetermined loops synchronised to a global tempo. I am interested in what lies beyond the boundaries of conventional 4/4, loop-based EDM performance and new modes of live interaction beyond the norm. In the performance I explore the tension between musician/machine and control/unpredictability. The performance is made possible by nativeKONTROL’s Clyphx MIDI Remote Scripts for Ableton Live and a custom Ableton Push Controller mapping, which allows the user to extend and rework the relationship between musician and machine. In extending the creative possibilities of commercial devices beyond what they offer 'out of the box', novel forms of interaction can be uncovered and new musical terrain observed. Original electronic source material is reimagined through real-time loop manipulation to create synchronous/asynchronous rhythms and textures, evolved with effects and dynamic processors.
    • Demons of dust and Gods of boiled rice: Shamanism and ephemeral ritual art in the Himalayas

      Nicoletti, Martino; University of Derby, School of Art and Design (Assumption University, Bangkok, 2012)
      Some recent researches carried out in the fields of Himalayan ethnography and anthropology of art have enlightened about the very artistic and aesthetical elements related to the shamanic rituals of this specific area. In this context, some specific ritual artefacts – comprising drawings and aniconic three-dimensional objects created according to the personal imagination of the shaman and specific rules handed down orally – play a central role in most shamanic liturgical séances. These artefacts are commonly employed as temporary receptacles for the invisible beings evoked during the ritual, as well as a symbolic representation of the shamanic cosmos. In accordance with their specific functions and meanings, these ritual objects – usually made of perishable material such as coloured powders, paper, wood, fruit or comestible paste, appropriately moulded – are very often unequivocally characterized by their ephemeral status: created at the beginning of the ritual performance they are usually destroyed during the execution of the rite itself or at the very end.
    • Derbyshire and pottery

      White, Christine; University of Derby (Ruthin Craft Centre, 2014)
      When the opportunity arose for our research team in ceramics to put together some short essay for this catalogue we were certain of one thing: we needed to be able to express a range of opinion and approaches to Emmanuel Cooper's work. What was most important to us was that for his work as a potter was the centre of our thinking and from that we would attempt to present a snapshot of his curiosity with life that informed his work as a maker.
    • DerbyVoice - Creative Place-Making: CivicLAB: Symposium

      Jones, Rhiannon; McMahon, Daithi; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2021-07)
      The artistic research project Derby Voice engaged 300 young people from areas of deprivation in Derby and at risk of exclusion from education. The methodology used S.H.E.D to create a co-designed site-specific installation at Derby Cathedral. It provided young people with opportunities to create work for a public context, to talk about their city and issues exacerbated by the COVID pandemic in the UK; such as BLM, education reform, employment, mental health and well-being. The research identified key barriers including the lack of cultural integration outside of school time in the UK and the impact on financial or family support. Derby Voice highlights the value of devising an artistic and dialogic methodology. It enhanced wellbeing, widened access and increased cultural opportunities for young people in Derby. It shifted thinking about formal education settings and redefined the way young people’s voices are understood and can influence policy and act as a call for change. The research highlights the benefits of temporal installations as cultural and consultation spaces for stakeholders, public and policy-makers to engage directly with youth voice, through creative place-making by young people. It disseminated both the design and impact of the research, proposing that dialogic methodologies are an instigator for change in order to enable and empower young people. The research actively contributed to the cultural offer in Derby and impacts of socially-engaged art.
    • DerbyVoice - Creative Place-Making: The Arts in Society Voices 16th International Conference

      Jones, Rhiannon; McMahon, Daithi; University of Western Australia (Common Ground Research Networks, 2021-06-16)
      The artistic research project Derby Voice engaged 300 young people from areas of deprivation in Derby and at risk of exclusion from education. The methodology used S.H.E.D to create a co-designed site-specific installation at Derby Cathedral. It provided young people with opportunities to create work for a public context, to talk about their city and issues exacerbated by the COVID pandemic in the UK; such as BLM, education reform, employment, mental health and well-being. The research identified key barriers including the lack of cultural integration outside of school time in the UK and the impact on financial or family support. Derby Voice highlights the value of devising an artistic and dialogic methodology. The research’s impact is noted within UK contemporary social contexts. It enhanced wellbeing, widened access and increased cultural opportunities for young people in Derby. It shifted thinking about formal education settings and redefined the way young people’s voices are understood and can influence policy and act as a call for change. The research highlights the benefits of temporal installations as cultural and consultation spaces for stakeholders, public and policy-makers to engage directly with youth voice, through creative place-making by young people. It provided essential life skills resulting in social mobility and widening access to the arts. It disseminated both the design and impact of the research, proposing that dialogic methodologies are an instigator for change in order to enable and empower young people. The research actively contributed to the cultural offer in Derby and impacts of socially-engaged art.
    • DerbyVoice Documentary Short

      Basi, Philip Ranjit; University Of Derby (University of Derby, 2021-09-01)
      This observational documentary short captures the enthusiasm and passion of the Derby Voice exhibition which is part of the Research Project led by Dr Rhiannon Jones and Dr Daithi McMahon responding to the need for creating a space for civic dialogue and social cohesion in relation to justice and protest in the UK. The objective of Derby Voice is to provide a platform to those young people in our city, to showcase their artistic talent and for their views on the issues that matter to them to be heard loud and clear. Being born and brought up in the city this was an ideal opportunity to utilise my expertise and experience e and capture and documentary t the event for future dissemination and a starting point for others to have dialogue around the issues raised. This all so offered a unique opportunity of collaboration between creatives across the university and beyond.
    • Design for Planet: Climate Action Workshop and Pledges

      Jones, Rhiannon; Barend, Slabbert; V&A Dundee; University of Derby (V&A Dundee, 2021-11-08)
      The aim of the study was to capture the impact of the Design for Planet S.H.E.D project work, which contains 1) A school workshop 2) Conference delegates making pledges for the planet 3) Public consultation optional activity with 6 questions. This will be alongside a bespoke artistic installation and workshop on the participants and find out what benefits it may have given them. We will gain the impressions of the public and school children from Dundee who will attend a S.H.E.D Workshop to make placards about climate change at large who come and engage with the installation at the V&A Dundee where we will be installed for Design Council Uk, Design for Planet COP26 Summit. The objectives for the study was to Install a bespoke Design for Planet S.H.E.D at the V&A Dundee that would facilitate a conversation with the public and as a result of its design bring school children on site to the V&A Dundee. Through this, we were able to better understand how this has changed (if at all) the visibility and thinking of participants who have contributed to the exhibit and workshop. We were also able to measure the impact on the participants/public, how (if at all) has this changed their perspectives on Design and climate change and their place in the Climate Challenge. The outcome of this research enquiry captured the thinking of young people in Dundee and the city on the issue of climate change. This was achieved through the methodology of creative place-making through the use of S.H.E.D as a co-designed space. This collaborative initiative between VandA Dundee, Design Council, Uk, University of Derby, Designing Dialogue CIC, National Justice Museum, The University of Derby, Claypotts Castle PS School Dundee. Dr Jones was invited by Design Council CEO to install, working with the V&A Dundee Learning team and Designing Dialogue CIC we were able to deliver a schools workshop to capture thoughts of Dundee school children manifested in placards and potted seeds and other artworks from National justice museum and shed partners. The pledge board, invited VIP delegates at the summit to pledge to the planet something tangible they will do and this will be captured on an installation panel wall within S.H.E.D, pledges were live etched in wood. This will fed into capturing of pledges, dissemination work and research into global design leaders thinking in 2021 and as a resource for the Design Council, uk. The workshop collected photos, audio and podcast material from the school children and engaged them in the research enquiry into creative place-making through the use of co-desing to facilitate change for the climate and the planet. It also continues to test the working methodology of Dr Jones through the use of S.H.E.D as a space for designing dialogue.
    • Design for Planet: Cocreate with community

      Jones, Rhiannon; V&A Dundee; University of Derby (2021-11-08)
      Dr Rhiannon Jones was invited to present her research at the Design Council, UK summit hosted at the V&A Dundee. Dr Jones spoke of codesign and cocreation with communities, and the methodology of the S.H.E.D as a reseraxhc process to work between communities and H.E and how it can work towards creating influnce and driving policy change. It also gave example of how design is conceptualised in terms of the root, greek definition for dialogue - as something that is moving, living, and transforming. This application towards an object, such as a shed in order to create a transformative/reconfigurable arts space as a way to consult with and problem solve matters such as climate change. 120 Global design leaders and innovators were invited to the Design Council Summit to listen to the talk, in response to COP26. Along with an online audience of over 5,500. Design for Planet was a landmark festival to galvanise and support the UK’s design industry to commit to a sustainable, climate-first future. The two-day event will give a platform for visionaries across the sector who are leading the way in sustainability and climate action, and will support others in the industry to prioritise the welfare of our planet in their work. Design for Planet welcomed over 100 invited experts and was live streamed to thousands of online participants.
    • Design for Planet: S.H.E.D [Installation]

      Jones, Rhiannon; Slabbert, Barend; VandA Dundee; University of Derby (Design Council, UK, 2021-11-08)
      Dr Rhiannon Jones was invited by the Design Council, UK to design a bespoke S.H.E.D Installation for Design for Planet, which was commissioned by the Design Council for installation at the V&A Dundee. The research activity was divided into four distinctive elements: A workshop with local Dundee schools to engage with the local community on climate change. A bespoke S.H.E.D that was created and positioned outside the V&A Dundee, for public engagement and interaction. A bespoke pledge wall that was designed for, and installed inside the V&A to capture pledges from design leaders as a call for action A sound pod installation designed for, and installed inside the V&A, that had original podcasts created by children aged 6 - 18 with EmprezU from Derby, on the subject of Climate Change. The combination of these elements resulted in a dynamic creative placemaking methodology for engaging the public of Dundee, local schools in Dundee and global leaders in design experts through the use of a co-designed civic space. . The installation addressed how to co-design S.H.E.D for the V&A and the Design Councils theme of climate Change. The installation responded to the themes of co-creation with communities, and content displayed on S.H.E.D reflected the local community of Dundee, allowing for public consultation and engagement with artistic content on display from a range of artists and partners from the UK. Barend Slabbert supported this research activity with creating the visualisation of the designs and install processes along side the Designing Dialogue CIC which delivers S.H.E.D.
    • A design journey across time and five nations

      Wells, Kate; University of Derby (2019-09-19)
      ‘Itajime gasuri’: A design journey across time and five nations. A design journey of twenty years and five nations starting in Japan to Thailand then back again. This paper discuses a journey of the textile patterning technique itajime gasuri. How it evolved from an ancient craft/dyeing practice through digital intervention to a process reinvention, one that retains some of the qualities of original process but creates fabric designs suitable for the 21st century consumption. Across the World, the ancient fabric patterning technique of ‘board clamping’, has been constantly reinvented, but over the last few centuries its traditional use has declined to almost extinction. Known by different names depending upon the country of origin, the most common today is the Japanese term Itajime, but an older word Kyokechi is sometimes used and a variation Itajime gasuri, invented in 1837 is a patterning technique for yarn provided an ‘ikat’ effect design. But to the authors knowledge, by 1996, the technique, Itajime and Itajime gasuri are no longer employed commercially with the exception of the Japanese craftsman, Norio Koyama, who was the only remaining craftsperson in Japan to employ the traditional process of Itajime gasuri and Itajime in a commercial manner. In 1996, Norio Koyama made a gift of eight boards to the author, this much-prized gift has ensured that the knowledge of such an ancient technique continued to be developed as part of practice- based research into the 21st Century. As digital technologies evolved, these new technologies were investigated to find new methods of creating boards or reproducing the original fabrics produced that retained the qualities of original pieces but could be replicated. Initially through digital copies of the original designs; the exploration of CAD/CAM production techniques for new boards to finally a collaboration with ‘Turnbull Prints’ in Thailand, who collaborated in digitizing an original dyed Itajime fabric and digitally printing a warp which when woven produced a new hybrid fabric that reflects the qualities of the original Itajime gasuri technique. The excitement occurs when a process initially invented in 1837 to copy and increase production of the labor-intensive textile resist dyeing technique Ikat can be once again employed to create designs that if digitally printed onto a warp will, once woven, produce a ‘Ikat’ effect: A complete cycle of creativity and innovation created and over 20 years later, a piece of this fabric was returned as a gift to Norio Koyama in Japan to complete the collaboration cycle and say Thank you.
    • Designing a new documentary landscape: A renegotiation of documentary voice through animated collage

      Bosward, Marc; Bevan, Greg; University of Derby; University of Aberystwyth (Intellect, 2013-12)
      Documentaries represent issues and aspects of the socio-historical world. They do so through a selection and combination of audio and visual components. Inevitably, this practice makes intrinsic claims about documentary’s ability to represent the world both accurately and reliably. Facts, information, balance and reliability are the bedrock of documentary vocabulary. Comparatively few practitioners have genuinely interrogated the veracity of their craft; authenticity, evidence and objectivity remain central to the language of their practice. As the result of a mediated process, a documentary film is, at best, a crafted version of reality and its conventions are designed and developed to convince audiences of the authenticity of their particular representation of the world. Documentary’s traditional journalistic and pseudo-scientific status has hampered its development as a discursive art form capable of exploring a much broader sphere of human experience. Using a selection of still images, this article aims to contextualize, reflect on and illuminate the short, animated documentary Fforest (2009) by G. Bevan and M. Bosward. Drawing on the practice and principles of collage, the film seeks to expand the language of documentary production by deliberately undermining traditional approaches to knowledge, authority and fact. It explores potential new terrain for documentary by generating a non-realist, visual aesthetic that is not bound to traditional discourses of ‘sobriety’, whilst reaffirming the documentary as a composition which must be designed and assembled, in which authorial voice must be constructed rather than simply stated, and in which meaning is not necessarily explicit.
    • Designing uncertainty for generating audiences’ participation

      Penna, Xristina; University of Leeds (02/11/2017)
    • Desiring a Connection with Others: Learning from and with dogs through artistic research

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (Universidad Colegio Mayor de Cundinamarca, 2021-12)
      The animal, and the questions that pertain to it in respect of its often-complex relationship with humanity, are of significance when considering agency, equality and effective co-dependencies. How human animals respond too, and treat non-humans, particularly those invited into our homes to be companions, has pertinency within the assembly of interspecies constructs. That non-human animals are always the observed (Berger, 1980) must be re-examined, re-addressed and re-balanced for it influences how humans consider other species as bodies of lesser value. This article explores the intricacies, complexities and productive abundancies in my artistic research project, Be Your Dog, which aims to do just. It discusses gender perspectives and specificities, the formation of the dog pack and its individual components, and the sway of the gallery on artistic relevance in this project that explores how to establish equality through interspecies synchronicity and empathy within a creative act. Available online in English and Spanish, and in print in Spanish.