• Itajime gasuri: digital warps

      Wells, Kate; University of Derby (World Shibori Network, 31/10/2014)
      Itajime gasuri is a Japanese resist technique, which today is almost extinct but was originally employed to patterned warp yarns by clamping them between two boards engraved in high relief. When the clamped bundle was then immersed in a dye-bath, the dye was unable to penetrate into the areas under pressure and the resulting dyed and finally woven cloth produced an ikat like pattern. A process invented by Tomoshicihi Miura in 1837 to copy and increase production of the labor intensive textile dyeing technique ikat was re-discovered by the highly skilled Craftsman and Japanese weaver Norio Koyama, who in 1996 when visited in Japan was the only remaining craftsperson to still employ on a commercial level, the traditional process of itajime gasuri: the utilization of identically carved wooden boards to resist pattern fabrics. As a silk weaver, Norio Koyama, became interested in the process of itajime gasuri having purchased the last remaining full set of traditional clamping boards. Teaching himself the intricate and precise processes involved with the technique and required to produce lengths of fabric with patterns similar to double 'ikat'. A present of eight old boards to the author enabled the technique to spread to Europe and has enabled further research to be carried out into the processes involved and along side advancements in digital technology provided an opportunity to reinvent the process by employing old or newly digitally machined boards to produce modern versions of such textiles, which when combined with digital technology in the form of image manipulation and digital printing both onto prepared fabric bases and warps prior to weaving has enabled the process to reinvent itself and design qualities achieved with such a technique evolve into a patterning method for the 21st Century. The excitement occurs when a process invented by Tomoshicihi Miura in 1837 to copy and increase textile production of the resist dyeing technique ikat can be once again employed to create textile designs if new Itajime gasuri boards are created with digital manufacturing techniques and digital scanning along side digital printed will once woven produce an ikat effect: A complete cycle of creativity and innovation being achieved.
    • I want you to participate: Pause for thought

      Penna, Xristina; University of Leeds (University of Leeds, 31/05/2017)
      This colloquium took place at Stage@leeds, School of Performance and Cultural Industries, University of Leeds on May 31st 2017. It aimed to contribute to Harpin and Nicholson’s ‘reflective response to why the contemporary moment appears somehow to need participation’ (2017: 15). It focused on questions regarding the resistances, crises, or ethical dilemmas encountered by the invited artists, and creative researchers when using participatory formats. Aim was to collect direct insights from an eclectic group of artists, and creative researchers who work across installation, intermedia, immersive, applied art, and performance, and who utilise these formats.
    • A Mixed History: Colliding Realities and the Hybrid Aesthetic

      Bosward, Marc; University of Derby (31/05/2016)
      With reference to historiography, the paper will ask how found footage can be manipulated to create alternate histories that challenge orthodox, ‘grand’ narratives within a hybrid aesthetic that foregrounds the diversity of its components, producing deliberate stylistic and ontological discontinuities. The practice echoes the ubiquity and malleability of video material in contemporary communications and media and examines the reliability and authenticity of the video image as a historical document. The work interrogates appropriation strategies that decontextualize and recontextualise found footage as a method of ideological interruption, releasing the mutable, multiple meanings that accumulate and shift in the confluence of competing discourses.
    • Dynamic loops and processing

      Vandemast-Bell, Paul; Brown, Michael; University of Derby (30/11/2016)
      This performance, a collaboration between musician Paul Vandemast-Bell and visual artist Michael Brown, investigates a dialogue between real-time rhythmic, audio-visual elements. It builds on audio research presented by Paul Vandemast-Bell at NIME16 in Brisbane, Australia: http://hdl.handle.net/10545/620094
    • Bonfire of the inanities

      Lennox, Peter; University of Derby (30/09/2010)
      Times are hard and cuts have to be made, so let’s start by putting an end to verbosity and all those mind-bogglingly long assignments, research papers and reports,writes Peter Lennox, succinctly
    • Seeing in: Two-fold, three-fold?

      Robinson, Carl; University of Derby (Mac Birmingham, 29/11/2016)
      Taking Richard Wollheim’s theory that seeing pictures is a two-fold experience of perception, (between the marked surface of the physical object and something depicted in its surface), this paper analyses my recent practice of creating artworks that place painted marks directly onto photographic prints of paint marks as a means of challenging the viewer as to what exactly is being seen in the picture. This conjoined photographic / painting practice also builds on Regina-Nino Kurg’s assertion that there is, in fact, a three-fold perceptual experience in seeing pictures. That is, seeing the physical object that is the picture - its configuration, whilst simultaneously seeing the object depicted in the picture - its representation, and the subject of the picture - its figuration. The research opens debates around the perceptual differences of seeing in the photographic image, which contains both representation and figuration; seeing in the painted image, which can contain either representation or representation and figuration; and seeing in the picture comprising of both the photographic and the painted. It is at the point of physical conjunction between photograph and paint that the question of multiple-‘foldness’ becomes particularly complex, and which this paper will begin to explicate. This particular research-based practice aims to illuminate an aspect of my overarching PhD research question, ‘To what degree can an art practice of painting onto digital photographic prints illuminate the ontological relationship between representational painting and photography in the digital age’?
    • World Heart Day 2017

      Levesley, Richard; University of Derby (29/09/2017)
      A national campaign that engaged social media, fashion design, publication and media to engage in the world heart day. A diverse visual response to the open theme of the heart, capturing cultural, and humorous characterisation associated with hearts. Engaged media in the campaign and raise awareness of the charity globally.
    • Hand on heart

      McNaney, Nicki; University of Derby (29/09/2017)
      An Illustration created for Rankin Photography Studio, to promote British Heart Foundation, “World Heart Day” An international art project with creatives from around the world, to raise awareness of the global fight against heart disease through the use of social media.
    • 3D audio as an information-environment: manipulating perceptual significance for differntiation and pre-selection

      Lennox, Peter; Vaughan, John; Myatt, Tony; University of York (Laboratory of Acoustics and audio signal processing and the Telecommunications Software and Multimedia Laboratory, Helsinki University of Technology, 29/08/2001)
      Contemporary use of sound as artificial information display is rudimentary, with little 'depth of significance' to facilitate users' selective attention. We believe that this is due to conceptual neglect of 'context' or perceptual background information. This paper describes a systematic approach to developing 3D audio information environments that utilise known cognitive characteristics, in order to promote rapidity and ease of use. The key concepts are perceptual space, perceptual significance, ambience labelling information and cartoonification.
    • Dogs and the elderly: significant cohabitation and companionship towards the end of life

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (29/04/2019)
      We seek comfort from other beings and this often finds a solution in our relationships with dogs. Walter Benjamin said “no single dog is physically or temperamentally like another,” which in part attests to our interspecies domestic closeness based on reliance and need. Nowhere is this seen more than in their companionship with the elderly. The positivity for health of a life with dogs is relevant to the elderly, those may feel isolated and vulnerable without another with whom to share life. Here, dogs become a vital companion, alleviating depression and isolation and giving a sense of usefulness. Although sharing one’s life with a dog gives purpose and comfort, it also brings anxieties regarding care and separation should that relationship change or cease. For the elderly, this concerns being worried of their dog’s fate should they enter managed housing or care facilities, or if separated by illness or death. The ‘burden’ they would leave sees the elderly intentionally deny homing another dog should theirs die. This denial renders the dog a last memorial to the significance of the companionship that informed life. This presentation discusses my art project ‘Dogs and the Elderly’ that focuses on the significance and benefit of interspecies companionship towards the end of life. This project with the Alzheimer’s Society demonstrates how interspecies cohabitation is valuable for emotional health and wellbeing. Participants offer heart-warming and heart- breaking accounts of a lonelier and dog-free life when their current companion becomes their last. The fear of not being able to ensure safe continuing care produces a self-imposed loneliness, one where it seems better to know they will not commit a dog to an unknown future than to benefit from their friendship now. The dog becomes the living remains of a relationship that can no longer be accommodated.
    • Human rights, participatory theatre and regional publics: Acting Alone and A Story to Tell

      Hunt, Ava; University of Derby (29/04/2017)
      This paper explores how artists are continuing to develop new participatory theatre models that address social and political issues within a human rights arena. Using my productions, Acting Alone and A Story to Tell, as its primary case studies, the paper will examine how efficacy can be created with different community audiences by experimenting with forms of participatory, autobiographical and verbatim theatre. Acting Alone is a monologue performance about Palastinian refugee camps from the perspective of a mother and artist, and A Story to Tell is a verbatim first-hand account of refugees in Greece. Informed by current refugee theatre, theory and practice, this paper asks how artists might use performance to engage audiences in revolutionary thinking in relation to immigration, refugees and human rights issues. Boal’s premise that theatre is a weapon for revolution will be drawn on; however, when audiences may not be directly positioned as oppressed or oppressor, what other concerns are raised? If refugee stories are presented without political advocacy, they run the risk of reenforcing images of refugees as victims and the spectator as voyeur or by-stander. How might we appropriate Boal's work to contemporary western theatre practice to promote engagement with complex international issues and awareness of our shared responsibility towards human rights - in spite of cultural and geographical distance from the issues presented? What action can be taken? Graffiti on the streets of Athens last summer declared: ‘Our grandparents were refugees. Our parents were migrants. We have become racists’ (unknown 2016). How can theatre be a revolutionary voice to address these global and national questions?
    • Are my cognitive maps the same as yours? …or even, the same as mine?

      Lennox, Peter; University of Derby (29/01/2013)
      Cognitive map metaphors have become ubiquitous in diverse spatial perception research fields. Tolman's original 1948 formulation referred to way-finding in mazes, O'Keefe and Nadel described particular neural structures that can support spatial behaviours. Other usages may be more metaphorical and may even be incommensurate, one with the other. This talk was a discussion piece to compare and contrast current usages
    • Feel it in my bones: Composing multimodal experience through tissue conduction

      Lennox, Peter; McKenzie, Ian; Brown, Michael; University of Derby (Les éditions de PRISM, 28/09/2017)
      We outline here the feasibility of coherently utilising tissue conduction for spatial audio and tactile input. Tissue conduction display-specific compositional concerns are discussed; it is hypothesised that the qualia available through this medium substantively differ from those for conventional artificial means of appealing to auditory spatial perception. The implications include that spatial music experienced in this manner constitutes a new kind of experience, and that the ground rules of composition are yet to be established. We refer to results from listening experiences with one hundred listeners in an unstructured attribute elicitation exercise, where prominent themes such as “strange”, “weird”, “positive”, “spatial” and “vibrations” emerged. We speculate on future directions aimed at taking maximal advantage of the principle of multimodal perception to broaden the informational bandwidth of the display system. Some implications for composition for hearing-impaired are elucidated.
    • The same sky - A musical

      Ellis, Daniel; University of Derby; Harvey, Tim; Baggaley, Phil (Guildhall Theatre, 28/06/2016)
      THE SAME SKY is a ‘live’ on-going Musical Theatre project. This research investigates, from the perspective of the composer, the entire creative and technical process of producing a musical, from conception through to performance. The creative collaborative dialogue between composer, author and theatrical director in the production of a new musical will be presented and discussed. Each step has been documented allowing the investigation of the developmental mechanisms, planning, communication and practicalities involved in the launching of such a project. Considerations of the technical practicalities, theatrical possibilities within constrained budgets and how these also effect the compositional and artistic decisions made. It additionally explores the subjective nature of the creative process and questions how the combination of tried and tested compositional methodologies might combine with newer creative skill sets to ignite the development and evolution of a new project. Each step along the production timeline will be illustrated with musical examples to offer insight into the creative process. It is hoped that the research will demonstrate that it is indeed possible to produce a musical with little experience of the genre, providing the appropriate supporting expertise is in place; but this should not diminish the author’s many years experience in the related area of song-writing without which such a venture would be ill-advised.
    • Water-fountain-sculpture.

      Locke, Caroline; Wermers, Nicole; Bussmann, Valarie; Pye, William; Janzing, Godehard; German Forum for Art History; University of Derby (Henry Moore Foundation, 28/01/2017)
      This seminar event explored how water and fountains have been used by artists and sculptors for a variety of purposes. The afternoon began with a discussion of Marcel Duchamp's 'Fountain' (1917) and examined more recent examples of water sculpture such as the memorial at Ground Zero. In collaboration with Dr Godehard Janzing (Deutsches Forum für Kunstgeschichte), Valerie Bussmann (independent), Nicole Wermers (artist), William Pye (artist) and Caroline Locke (artist) . Godehard Janzing discussed ‘Falling Waters at Ground Zero: when Terrorism turns into Nature’ and how the use of the symbolism of water becomes problematic in this context. Valerie Bussmann continued the theme of the city with an examination of the relationship Paris has with water as both necessity and art. Water as a sculptural material was explored by Nicole Wermers, focusing specifically on her 2011 series ‘Wasserregal’ (‘Watershelves’). Caroline Locke shared the themes of water and vibration that have formed a key part of her practice. William Pye has long been inspired by water and first introduced it as a major sculptural element in his work in the 1980s.
    • The predictive scenographer: Performance design as predictive affordance-o-graphy

      Penna, Xristina; University of Leeds (27/11/2018)
      We are finding parts of ourselves, playing, playing with the light, unexpected events […] wood, fabric, cameras, sound equipment, and a bit of alcohol. Shades of red, grey, it is pretty dark, you cannot see much. It provokes you in terms of fiction. (Participant S3, practice-research project Work Space III, October 2015). In hybrid and participatory performance environments, the audience’s position constantly shifts and is not contained within a viewing area, like in traditional forms of theatre, raising questions for the performance maker such as: How do I design the distribution of the experience of the audience? How do I contextualise this distribution? How do I frame this experience; and the feelings generated by a distributed design? In this paper, I will reflect through specific performance practice on how the free-energy principle (Friston 2011) and PP (Clark 2013) can be useful for a performance designer (scenographer) as a method for performance making but also as a way of contextualising what participatory performances do and how they do it. The audience–participants’ predictive brains are understood to get a grip on multiple fields of affordances (both material, cultural, etc.) simultaneously, and these become interweaved in the circular causal weave between embodied brain and world. The plurality of possible fields of interrelations the audience–participants make in relation to the design stretch across interoceptive, proprioceptive, and exteroceptive information, providing “a rich new entry point for accounts of experience, emotion, and affect: accounts that do not compartmentalize cognition and emotion, but reveal them as (at most) distinctive threads in a single inferential weave” (Clark 2015: 296). WS III’s scenography could be described as an embodied, and ecological playful. prediction algorithm that had the audience–participants as anticipating errors predicating the next moves in order to maintain the organisation of the performance system..
    • Composing space: the ecology of artificial auditory environments

      Lennox, Peter; University of Derby (University of Derby, 27/11/2012)
      Whilst various spatial formats for music reproduction exist their reason for existence is not always clear; “spatiality” as a set of musical parameters remains on the periphery of musical thought.Pioneering composers continue to explore the possibilities of spatial music, they sometimes face unnecessary (if not insurmountable) impediments in the form of unsuitable technological implementations. This work is part of on-going research to develop intuitive compositional spatial sound tools that can incorporate elements of naturally available spatiality into musical syntax. In highlighting unnecessary technical constraints that are underwritten by conceptual constraints, we hope to help to break the deadlock. We look forward to spatial composition becoming more ambitious, subtle, engaging, immersive and innovative.
    • Time tides: An exploration of dynamic loop-based performance diffused in a multi-channel environment.

      Vandemast-Bell, Paul; Brown, Michael; University of Derby (Sounds in Space Symposium, 27/06/2017)
      This performance at Sounds in Space Symposium (University of Derby) by the audio-visual duo, Time.lus, explores (through live interaction) the dynamic dialogue between rhythmic, audio-visual materials in space. Original source material is presented then deconstructed and improvisationally reimagined in real-time, to create synchronous / asynchronous rhythms and textures. The work is evolved through the use of audio-visual effects and dynamic processors.
    • Leading strategic change in arts: twist or bust?

      Mcgravie, David; University of Derby (27/01/2017)
      Reviewing leadership and management of strategic level operations and change, and will draw on a number of relevant and diverse organization level case studies of change looking at how HEI manage change.
    • Fabrica-tactilis, skilful production, structure - Fabric that may be touched, tangible

      Wells, Kate; Poundall, Robyn; University of Derby; David Nieper Ltd. (26/11/2014)
      Over the last 15 years, many of the tactile and haptic qualities of printed textiles have been abandoned for what is considered a fast and smooth digital solution through the increased popularity in using digital media as a the main source for design inspiration, conception and manufacture. Much of the creativity and qualities produced by hand processes and non digital techniques that in past produced tactile surfaces within a material via the creation of different densities or composite multiple layered structures, have in many cases been replaced with optical digital illusions of texture with the actual tactility of the material being lost or compromised. This paper outlines current collaborative design research that explores the uniting of haptic processes within cross-disciplinary fields of textiles, ceramics and glass. The results are the creation of a variety of materials both soft and hard. 3D-Soft is the result of natural and man-made manipulated fabrics that exhibit three-dimensional textured, puckered, distorted and translucent/transparent effects. That with further cross-disciplinary experimentation, the tactile textural qualities of fabric are transposed into hard surfaces: 3D-Hard, through different stiffening, ceramic and glass processes. The main aim of the research being the creation of unique exciting materials ‘Fabrica-Tactilis’ that develop and unite haptic skills with touch, exploring contradiction and harmony by embracing both traditional and non-traditional textile processes and alternative craft techniques for example ceramics and glass within their manufacture.